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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 28, 2019


Harvard Wyss Institute researchers demonstrate machine-guided engineering of AAV capsids
Taking a more systematic approach to the capsid protein-engineering problem, Harvard researchers mutated one by one each of the 735 amino acids within the AAV2 capsid, the best-known member of the AAV family, including all possible codon substitutions, insertions and deletions at each position.
Additive manufacturing and NI/TI metal bolster cooling technology
Scientists at the University of Maryland have developed a novel elastocaloric cooling material, comprised of a nickel (Ni)-titanium (Ti) alloy and sculpted using additive technology, that is highly efficient, eco-friendly and easily scaled-up for commercial use.
Research enables artificial intelligence approach to create AAV capsids for gene therapies
Dyno Therapeutics announces a publication in Science demonstrating the power of a comprehensive machine-guided approach to improve adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsids for gene therapies.
Fatigue-resistant, high-performance cooling materials enabled by 3D printing
High-performance solid-state elastocaloric cooling materials with exceptional fatigue resistance are made possible by 3D printing a nickel-titanium based alloy, researchers report.
Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older moms more likely to develop heart problems
Changes occur in the placenta in older pregnant mothers leading to a greater likelihood of poor health in their male offspring, a study in rats has shown.
Half of all women with HIV are diagnosed late in Europe
Many women in the WHO European Region, particularly those in their 40s, are diagnosed at a late stage of HIV infection when their immune system is already starting to fail.
Pharmacist-led interventions may help prevent cardiovascular disease
With their expertise in the safe and effective use of medications, pharmacists can help in the management of chronic diseases.
The coldest reaction
In temperatures millions of times colder than interstellar space, Harvard researchers have performed the coldest reaction in the known universe.
Informed consent for heart procedure: most patients overestimate benefits
Most patients do not understand or recall information given to them before heart procedures.
Underwater telecom cables make superb seismic network
Photonic systems can transform underwater fiber-optic cables into a dense network of seismic stations to illuminate ocean-floor earthquake zones impossible to study today, according to a new study by researchers from UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab and Rice University.
Climate science: Amazon fires may enhance Andean glacier melting
Burning of the rainforest in southwestern Amazonia (the Brazilian, Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon) may increase the melting of tropical glaciers in the Andes, according to a study in Scientific Reports.
Home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis
A new home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis -- according to new research.
An agenda for multidisciplinary cyber risk research
The science of cyber risk is inherently interdisciplinary, argue Gregory Falco and colleagues in this Policy Forum, and no single academic field on its own can adequately address related problems.
Illuminating seafloor seismology with existing 'dark' fiber-optic cables
A new fault system on the seafloor was discovered off California's coast by temporarily transforming a pre-existing underwater fiber optic cable into an array of nearly 10,000 seismic sensors, according to a new study.
Combine chemical probe resources to optimize biomedical research, scientists urge
A new report urges biomedical researchers to use online web resources very carefully, taking into account their complementary benefits and weaknesses, when selecting small-molecule chemical probes to help answer their research questions.
How individual cell types in the brain contribute to Alzheimer's disease
Despite great investments, an effective drug-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia among the elderly, remains elusive.
Growing nano-tailored surfaces using micellar brushes
Growing nanoscale polymer brushes on materials' surfaces overcomes a key challenge in surface chemistry, researchers report, creating a new way to fabricate a diverse array of materials that could hold advanced uses in catalysis or chemical separation applications, for example.
Toward more efficient computing, with magnetic waves
MIT researchers have devised a novel circuit design that enables precise control of computing with magnetic waves -- with no electricity needed.
U of Guelph researcher helps measure worldwide nitrogen levels in grasslands
A University of Guelph ecologist has taken part in a global project to monitor real-world nitrogen cycles in grassland soils to build understanding that is critical for measuring impacts on the ecosystem & food production.
Unexpected pattern of fish species richness found in the Amazon Basin
International collaboration results in largest-ever inventory of Amazon fish fauna.
Babies in neonatal intensive care exposed to harmful chemicals, study finds
A multidisciplinary team of scientists from Granada, Spain, has detected bisphenol A (BPA) and parabens (PBs) in a wide range of plastic medical devices, fabrics, and personal care products commonly used in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), coming into direct contact with new-born babies Among the 50 items analysed were plastic syringes, feeding tubes and catheters, oxygen masks, endotracheal tubes, personal care products, dressings, clothing, nappy-changing mats and mattress protectors, among others
TU Dresden biologists examine sperm quality on the basis of their metabolism
Every tenth couple worldwide is affected by infertility. The reasons for this are manifold, but mostly well researched.
Disclaimers on retouched photos don't solve problem of negative body image
Labels that warn an image has been altered or enhanced do nothing to mitigate women's negative perceptions of their appearance, according to a study published in Body Image this week.
Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)
One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland.
People with depression experience suicidal thoughts despite treatment
One in five people with depression have suicidal thoughts despite treatment with antidepressants.
ICO and IDIBELL researchers study the risk of false positives in colon cancer screening
Researchers from the Oncology Data Analytics Program (PADO), the Screening Unit of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the ICO and CIBERESP have just published in the scientific journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention a study to estimate the cumulative risk of a 'false positive' result in the fecal occult blood test.
New device enables battery-free computer input at the tip of your finger
Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a device for wearable computer input suitable for many situations, just by touching your fingertips together in different ways.
How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set the stage for early life on Earth
Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early climate warm, and in forming the world's largest iron ore deposits billions of years ago.
Creating the conditions for a globally just energy transition
How can the energy transition be organized in a globally just way?
Ecofriendly nano-fabrication achieved with biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles
The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) succeeded in creating glass with self-cleaning and antireflective functions through the biodegradable chitosan nanoparticle coating.
Whales stop being socialites when boats are about
The noise and presence of boats can harm humpback whales' ability to communicate and socialise, in some cases reducing their communication range by a factor of four.
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019.
Tinder is a waste of time for most people
Dating apps won't help you much if your goal is to have more relationships.
Predicting molecular bond energy by artificial intelligence
Theoretical prediction of molecular bond energy is of key importance for understanding molecular properties.
Researchers find a way to collect elusive blood stem cells from zebrafish
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be used to better understand and treat blood-based diseases.
Tiny fossils, big findings: UAlberta paleontologists discover odd mid-Cretaceous shrimp
One of the most incomplete fossil records of marine life is being filled in by a new find by a team of paleontologists from the University of Alberta, Yale University, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute -- with the discovery of hundreds of tiny comma shrimp fossils.
Atomic-scale imaging of defect dynamics under heating by in situ Cs-corrected TEM
Formation and atomic process of the defects of ceria nanowires was studied under heating by using in situ Cs-TEM.
Virtual reality becomes more real
Scientists from Skoltech ADASE (Advanced Data Analytics in Science and Engineering) lab have found a way to enhance depth map resolution, which should make virtual reality and computer graphics more realistic.
Concussion recovery not clear cut for children
Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter.
First operational mapping system for high-resolution tropical forest carbon emissions created using
For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail.
Evidence found in European birds of the transmission of tropical malaria
Scientists have found, for the first time, house sparrow in Spain to be a host for a parasite from Africa, Plasmodium PAGRI02, which had not been previously described outside that continent.
Compliance with Paris Agreement would limit loss of productivity in fishing, agriculture
An international team of scientists led by the CNRS, also involving the University of Montpellier in France, show that 90% of the global population may face decreases in productivity for both agriculture and fishing if greenhouse emissions are not reduced.

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