Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 29, 2019
Armored with plastic 'hair' and silica, new perovskite nanocrystals show more durability
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have demonstrated a novel approach aimed at addressing the perovskite's durability problem: encasing the perovskite inside a double-layer protection system made from plastic and silica.

Elizabeth I identified as author of Tacitus translation
A new article in the Review of English Studies argues that a manuscript translation of Tacitus's Annales, completed in the late sixteenth century and preserved at Lambeth Palace Library, was done by Queen Elizabeth I.

Fine-tuning gene expression during stress recovery
Scientists have discovered non-coding RNA has a novel role to fine-tune gene expressions during stress recovery, getting closer to uncovering a 30-year-old nuclear mystery.

Electro-optical device provides solution to faster computing memories and processors
The first ever integrated nanoscale device which can be programmed with either photons or electrons has been developed by scientists in Harish Bhaskaran's Advanced Nanoscale Engineering research group at the University of Oxford.

Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration
Young fish can be drawn to degraded coral reefs by loudspeakers playing the sounds of healthy reefs, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds
An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC).

NUS researchers find potential solution to overheating mobile phones
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has developed a revolutionary way to encode computational information without using electrical current.

New study reveals high levels of pollution on London Underground
Researchers from King's College London have carried out the first comprehensive study of fine particles on the London Underground to evaluate the exposure of people travelling on different parts of the network.

Paleontologists identify new group of pterosaurs
New research suggests that ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists including scientists at the University of Alberta and the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

SUTD-led research sets the groundwork for patient-specific 3D printed meniscus
SUTD together with the University of Miyazaki developed a novel methodology to provide non-invasive analysis of meniscal implants.

Immunology: Activation by breakdown
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers report that a central component of the innate immune response is activated by two short RNAs which are produced by site-specific cleavage of a precursor RNA molecule - and both derivatives are generated by the same enzyme.

Study sheds new light on role iron biology plays in disease
New research shows that the body's system for regulating iron is much more complex than originally thought--and this has surprising implications in at least three human diseases, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

Spirituality affects the behavior of mortgagers
According to Olga Miroshnichenko, a Sc.D in Economics, and a Professor at the Department of Economics and Finance, Tyumen State University, morals affect the thinking of mortgage payers and help them avoid past due payments.

Inter faculty -- Journal of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Social Sciences, Vol.9
Volume 9 of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of patterns of confluence and influence in the context of the movements of history.

No kale left behind: A new supple management method to limit perishable waste
Many of us know that sting of disappointment when we realize our fridge contents are seriously past their prime.

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes a strengthening Typhoon Kammuri
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with infrared and nighttime views of Typhoon Kammuri that showed the storm continued to strengthen.

Providing safe, clean water
In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain.

Scientists have developed environmentally friendly way to build up road foundations
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Federal University of Technology -- ParanĂ¡/Brazil together with colleagues from Kazakhstan have proposed to build road foundations from a mixture of loam, metal slag and lime waste instead of traditional layers of natural sand and gravel.

Dietary supplements may delay aging in animal models
Patients with Werner Syndrome age significantly earlier than others. In animal models for the disease supplements of the drug NAD+ prolong life and delay age-related diseases.

The Eurasian continent remembers and amplifies cold waves as the Arctic warms
Cold waves triggered by sea ice loss in the Arctic are memorized in the Eurasian Continent, amplifying cooling in the winters to follow, according to a joint research team between Hokkaido University and Niigata University in Japan.

To see the invisible
Scientists are curious by nature and often look where they should not.

Mapping the relay networks of our brain
A team of scientists led by Karl Farrow at NeuroElectronics Research Flanders (NERF, empowered by imec, KU Leuven and VIB) is unraveling how our brain processes visual information.

New principle for activation of cancer genes discovered
Researchers have long known that some genes can cause cancer when overactive, but exactly what happens inside the cell nucleus when the cancer grows has so far remained enigmatic.

Study pinpoints barriers to preventive care for people at high risk for HIV
Many high-risk people eligible for medication to prevent HIV infection face barriers to obtaining a prescription, according to research by University of Massachusetts Amherst psychologist Avy Skolnik.

Ancient microbes helped to keep Earth's early climate warm
Ancient ancestors of modern microbes played a critical role in setting the stage for life on a dimly lit early Earth, and in creating the world's largest iron ore deposits, according to new research.

Smoking may cause white scars on the brain
Nearly half of all people over the age of 50 have scarring in their brain's white matter.
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