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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 02, 2019


Smarter strategies
Though small and somewhat nondescript, quagga and zebra mussels pose a huge threat to local rivers, lakes and estuaries.
Carpentry Compiler helps woodworkers design objects that they can actually make
UW researchers have created Carpentry Compiler, a digital tool that allows users to design woodworking projects.
Evidence: Antarctica's thinning ice shelves causing more ice to move from land into sea
New study provides the first evidence that thinning ice shelves around Antarctica are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea.
Researchers find protein promotes cancer, suppresses anti-tumor immunity
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that a protein involved in immune response to microbes, TBK1, also can fuel cancer development and suppress immune response to the disease.
Researchers may have discovered where HIV takes refuge during antiretroviral treatment
An international team led by Professor Jerome Estaquier from Universite Laval's Faculty of Medicine may have discovered where in the body HIV takes refuge during antiretroviral treatment.
Testing barley's salt tolerance is a numbers game
Factors influencing the tolerance of barley to saline soils have been uncovered using an advanced robust statistical technique.
New treatment triggers self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells.
RSNA 2019 presents session on lung injury from vaping
E-cigarette use is on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 9 million adults in the US use e-cigarettes, and vaping has become especially popular among teens.
New technique visually depicts how cancer cells grow and spread in colon tissue
Duke Cancer Institute researchers have observed how stem cell mutations quietly arise and spread throughout a widening field of the colon until they eventually predominate and become a malignancy.
Percentage of African ancestry affects gene expression
The percentage of African ancestry in a person's genome determines the level that certain genes are expressed, called mRNA, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
Scientist leads international team to crack 60-year-old mystery of Sun's magnetic waves
A Queen's University Belfast scientist has led an international team to the ground-breaking discovery of why the Sun's magnetic waves strengthen and grow as they emerge from its surface, which could help to solve the mystery of how the corona of the Sun maintains its multi-million degree temperatures.
Gains in one type of disruption force are offset by losses in another
Simulations show that halo currents can serve as a proxy for the total force produced by vertical disruptions.
Study highlights potential for 'liquid health check' to predict disease risk
Proteins in our blood could in future help provide a comprehensive 'liquid health check,' assessing our health and predicting the likelihood that we will we will develop a range of diseases, according to research published today in Nature Medicine.
SwRI-built instrument confirms solar wind slows farther away from the Sun
Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored.
Researchers compare nutritional value of infant and toddler foods
Infant and toddler foods sold in pouches have lower nutritional value than foods sold in jars and other packaging, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Daylight damage-saving time
A research team led by Kanazawa University investigated the ways sunlight can degrade the efficiency of newly developed organic photovoltaics over time.
Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age
In a review paper published in Nature Reviews Genetics, Professor Michael Jewett explores how cell-free gene expression stands to help the field of synthetic biology dramatically impact society, from the environment to medicine to education.
A close look at a sticky situation
New research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds the missing link between soft surface adhesion and the roughness of the hard surface it touches.
Mental health information in rural areas is best delivered face-to-face, study shows
Mental health is a concern in rural areas, as farmers cope with stress and uncertainty due to economic and environmental conditions.
When reefs die, parrotfish thrive
In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching.
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts.
Novel MRI-guided ultrasound treatment destroys prostate cancer
A novel MRI-guided procedure that uses therapeutic ultrasound effectively treats prostate cancer with minimal side effects, according to a new study.
Tiny woodlands are more important than previously thought
Small woodlands in farmland have more benefits for humans per area, compared to large forests according to a new study.
Researchers investigate the effects of eye movements when reading texts in different languages
The existence of language universality has been a key issue in psychology and linguistics, since the understanding of universals is crucial for the development of information perception models.
Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste
The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers.
Monkeys inform group members about threats -- following principles of cooperation
Humans are often faced with the choice of investing in the greater good or being selfish and letting others do the work.
Researchers discover new way to split and sum photons with silicon
A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Riverside have found a way to produce a long-hypothesized phenomenon -- the transfer of energy between silicon and organic, carbon-based molecules -- in a breakthrough that has implications for information storage in quantum computing, solar energy conversion and medical imaging.
Taste-related protein provides target for drugs to treat neurological disorders
Understanding how the brain processes sweet, bitter and umami tastes may one day help researchers design more effective drugs for neurological disorders.
Investigational drugs reduce risk of death from Ebola virus disease
The investigational therapeutics mAb114 and REGN-EB3 offer patients a greater chance of surviving Ebola virus disease (EVD) compared to the investigational treatment ZMapp, according to published results from a clinical trial conducted in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).
Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves
Physicists from Switzerland, Germany, and France have found that large-amplitude acoustic waves, launched by ultrashort laser pulses, can dynamically manipulate the optical response of semiconductors.
Researchers identify a process responsible for therapeutic resistance in breast cancer
Researchers at the Lady Davis Institute have identified a key protein that is required for resistance to chemotherapy in the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil
Poor transportation availability can result in poor access to health care and employment, hence reinforcing the cycle of poverty and concerning health outcomes such as low life expectancy and high child mortality in rural Brazil.
Bushmeat may breed deadly bacteria
People who eat wildebeests, wart hogs and other wild African animals may be at risk for contracting potentially life-threatening diseases, according to an international team of researchers.
Discovery of an unusual protein
Scientists from Bremen discover an unusual protein playing a significant role in the Earth's nitrogen cycle.
Researchers at IRB Barcelona study how altered protein degradation contributes to the development of tumors
Published in the journal Nature Cancer, the study analyses how genetic alterations in tumour cells prevent the correct degradation of the proteins involved in tumour development and growth, thereby leading to abnormal cell behaviour.
A CERN for climate change
In a Perspective article appearing in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tim Palmer (Oxford University), and Bjorn Stevens (Max Planck Society), critically reflect on the present state of Earth system modelling.
Cats' faces hard to read, except for 'cat whisperers,' research finds
Women and those with veterinary experience were better at recognizing cats' expressions -- even those who reported no strong attachment to cats.
Olaparib becomes first gene-targeted medicine to show benefits in prostate cancer
The phase II trial TOPARP-B found that over 80 per cent of men with prostate cancer whose tumours had mutations in the BRCA genes responded well to treatment with the targeted drug olaparib.
Brush your teeth to protect the heart
Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Improving drug delivery for brain tumor treatment
Despite improvements in drug delivery mechanisms, treating brain tumors has remained challenging.
High androgen levels during pregnancy increase the risk of PCOS for several generations
Daughters of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are five times more likely to be diagnosed with PCOS as adults, and the generational transmission is driven by high androgen levels during pregnancy, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report.
Colorado study suggests new strategies against bone metastases from prostate cancer
University of Colorado Cancer Center study suggests a new approach, or, possibly two new approaches against prostate cancer bone metastases: While targeted therapies and anti-cancer immunotherapies have not been especially successful against primary prostate cancers, the study suggests that both these approaches may be effective against the bone metastases that grow from primary prostate cancers, and, in fact, the type of bone metastasis may dictate which targeted therapies and immunotherapies work best.
Opioid overdose risk is high after medical treatment ends, study finds
People with opioid addiction face a high risk of overdose after ending treatment, even when treated for 18 months, a Columbia study has found.
Revealed: The deadly superbugs lurking in more than nine in ten make-up bags
The vast majority of in-use make-up products such as beauty blenders, mascara and lip gloss are contaminated with potentially life threatening superbugs, new research from Aston University published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology has revealed.
New clues about the origins of familial forms of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
A Brazilian study made important progress in understanding the accumulation of one of the proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Making higher-energy light to fight cancer
Researchers have achieved photon up-conversion, the emission of light with energy higher than the one that excites the material, using carefully designed structures containing silicon nanocrystals and specialized organic molecules.
Exposure to e-cigarette vapor fails to induce pneumonia in mouse models
Exposure to e-cigarette vapor containing nicotine had no impact on the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain TIGR4 to infect mouse models.
Researchers find clue to preventing addiction relapse
A study published in Neuropsychopharmacology reported that relapse can be prevented by controlling cells in a brain region called the nucleus accumbens.
When laser beams meet plasma: New data addresses gap in fusion research
Rochester scientists at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics and their colleagues in California and France have directly demonstrated for the first time how laser beams modify the conditions of a plasma, addressing one of the challenges in the longstanding quest to achieve fusion.
In hunted rainforests, termites lose their dominance
Termite populations in African rainforests decline sharply when elephants and other large animals disappear.
Satellite imagery shows Typhoon Kammuri's center obscured
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP or S-NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found Typhoon Kammuri's eye obscured.
LJI researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor
New work from the lab of La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) investigator Anjana Rao, Ph.D., reveals a previously unrecognized activity for a highly conserved DNA repair factor.
Advancement made in the visualization of large, complex datasets
An improvement to the premier data visualization tool t-distributed Stochastic Neighborhood Embedding (t-SNE), called optimized-t-SNE (opt-SNE), shines new light on researchers' ability to view exactly what is in their datasets.
Biophysics: Pattern formation on the cheap
Many cellular processes involve patterned distributions of proteins. Scientists have identified the minimal set of elements required for the autonomous formation of one such pattern, thus enabling the basic phenomenology to be explored.
'Native advertising' builds credibility, not perceived as 'tricking' visitors
CATONSVILLE, MD, December 2, 2019 - The concept of ''native advertising'' has been in existence for as long as advertisements were designed to resemble the editorial content in newspapers and magazines.
Throwing cold water on ice baths: Avoid this strategy for repairing or building muscle
New research suggests that ice baths aren't helpful for repairing and building muscle over time, because they decrease the generation of protein in muscles.
Significant developments in gamut mapping for the film industry
Presented in an article published on Nov. 14 in the journal IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence by Syed Waqas Zamir, a researcher at the Inception Institute of Artificial Intelligence, Abu Dhabi (UAE); along with Javier Vázquez-Corral and Marcelo-Bertalmío, researchers at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies.
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2019
ORNL story tips: An additively manufactured polymer layer applied to specialized plastic proved effective to protect aircraft from lightning strikes in lab test; injecting shattered argon pellets into a super-hot plasma, when needed, could protect a fusion reactor's interior wall from runaway electrons; ORNL will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr.
Decades old debate settled: Golgi key to maintenance of molecule-sorting station in cells
Contrary to current knowledge in the field, a different mechanism in which the Golgi is crucial, is responsible for maintaining the cell organelle that sorts and distributes substances entering a cell.
A trick for taming terahertz transmissions
Osaka University researchers have invented a wireless communication receiver that can operate in the terahertz frequency band.
Molecular vibrations lead to high performance laser
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have discovered a new phenomenon and are applying it to make a laser with over 40% efficiency-nearly 10 times higher than other similar lasers.
This 'fix' for economic theory changes everything from gambles to Ponzi schemes
Whether we decide to take out that insurance policy, buy Bitcoin, or switch jobs, many economic decisions boil down to a fundamental gamble about how to maximize our wealth over time.
Researchers find common measures of immune status, inflammation can predict mortality
A new collaborative study led by Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals has found that commonly used clinical indicators of immune status and inflammation can predict mortality in the general population.
A new way to control microbial metabolism
To help optimize microbes' ability to produce useful compounds but also maintain their own growth, MIT chemical engineers have devised a way to induce bacteria to switch between different metabolic pathways at different times.
Study finds common cold virus can infect the placenta
For the first time, researchers have shown that a common cold virus can infect cells derived from human placentas, suggesting that it may be possible for the infection to pass from expectant mothers to their unborn children.
Reflecting on photos helps young cancer survivors regain confidence
Young cancer survivors face unique medical and psychosocial challenges that can hinder their ability to move on mentally and socially, even years after their final treatment.
Decision-making process becomes visible in the brain
Transparent fish larvae reveal how a decision makes its way through the brain.
The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds
Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates.
Anthracnose alert: How bacteria prime fifth-biggest global grain crop against deadly fungus
Sorghum anthracnose devastates crops of the drought- and heat-resistant cereal worldwide.
Scientists reveal the structure of viral rhodopsins
The structure of an Organic Lake Phycodnavirus rhodopsin II (OLPVRII), which is a unique protein found in the genome of giant viruses, has been determined thanks to the work of MIPT graduates and PhD students.
Family support reduces chance of school and workplace bullying
Having a supportive family environment makes school-age LGB children in the UK significantly less likely to be victims of bullying, according to new research by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).
Earthquake risk perception: A picture is worth a thousand stats
Realistic images can be more effective than statistics for persuading people to support seismic upgrades to schools, UBC research suggests.
Justinianic plague not a landmark pandemic?
A study of diverse datasets, including pollen, coinage, and funeral practices, reveals that the effects of the late antique plague pandemic commonly known as the Justinianic Plague may have been overestimated.
Cultural differences account for global gap in online regulation -- study
Differences in cultural values have led some countries to tackle the specter of cyber-attacks with increased internet regulation, whilst others have taken a 'hands-off' approach to online security -- a new study shows.
Machine learning that works like a dream
University of Tsukuba researchers developed a machine learning algorithm that classifies the sleep stages of mice with record accuracy.
Study highlights 'worrying' increase in misuse of non-opioid medications
A major new analysis of the non-opioid medications, gabapentin and baclofen, shows 'worrying' increases in related suicide attempts and hospital admissions in US adults since 2013 -- coinciding with a decrease in opioid prescriptions.
New study reveals how ancient Puerto Ricans cooked
A new study by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami (UM) College of Arts and Sciences, and Valencia College analyzed the fossilized remains of clams to reconstruct the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico.
Why stress doesn't always cause depression
Rats susceptible to anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, possess more serotonin neurons after being exposed to chronic stress, but the effect can be reversed through amygdala activation, according to new research in JNeurosci.
New framework brings accuracy, efficiency to identifying stop words
Professor Luis Amaral and postdoctoral fellow Martin Gerlach's algorithmic approach automatically recognizes uninformative words in large collections of text, which could help researchers dramatically reduce computational requirements during data analyses.
NIH study reports more than half of US office-based physicians recommend CHA
A new study has shown that more than half (53.1%) of office-based physicians in the US, across specialty areas, recommended at least one complementary health approach (CHA) to their patients during the previous 12 months, with female physicians (63.2%) more likely to recommend a CHA than male physicians (49.3%).
Study: lack of tolerance, institutional confidence threaten democracies
The stability of democracies worldwide could be vulnerable if certain cultural values continue to decline, according to a new study published in Nature Human Behavior.
Model probes possible treatments for neonatal infection, a common cause of infant death
Extremely premature infants are at risk for life-threatening infections called late-onset sepsis, or LOS, that spread into their bodies from the intestine.
A nimbler way to track alcohol use -- by mining Twitter and Google searches
Collecting rigorous public health data through large survey-based studies is a slow, expensive process.
Pot while pregnant: UNLV medicine doctors urge caution
Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study from a team of UNLV Medicine doctors.
Click, click, cook: Online grocery shopping leaves 'food deserts' behind
A Yale University analysis found that most people in 'food deserts' in 8 states would increase their access to healthy, nutritious food if they purchase groceries online and had the food delivered as part of the federal government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).
2D materials boost carrier multiplication
IBS researchers discover a carrier multiplication process in 2D semiconductors that could increase the efficiency of future solar cells.
One in two homeless people may have experienced a head injury in their lifetime
People who are homeless experience a disproportionately high lifetime prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a new UBC-led study published today in The Lancet Public Health.
Oat pathogen defence discovery marks an important milestone
Researchers have identified the critical last pieces of a genetic defense system that gives oats resistance to soil pathogens.
UBCO study demonstrates dogs promote page turning
Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a UBC researcher.
Australian GPs widely offering placebos, new study finds
Most Australian GPs have used a placebo in practice at least once, with active placebos (active treatments used primarily to generate positive expectations) more commonly used than inert placebos, according to a new study from University of Sydney.
Study shows link between precipitation, climate zone and invasive cancer rates in the US
In a new study, researchers provide conclusive evidence of a statistical relationship between the incidence rates of invasive cancer in a given area in the US and the amount of precipitation and climate type (which combines the temperature and moisture level in an area).
Scientists build a 'Hubble Space Telescope' to study multiple genome sequences
Scientists can now simultaneously compare 1.4 million genetic sequences, helping classify how species are related to each other at far larger scales than previously possible.
A lifeline for leaky lung cells
Leaky lungs are a very common side effect of heart failure, but all currently available drugs do is reduce the amount of fluid in the body, rather than plug the leak itself.
Unexpected viral behavior linked to type 1 diabetes in high-risk children
New results from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study show an association between prolonged enterovirus infection and development of autoimmunity to the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells that precedes type 1 diabetes.
Endometriosis could be treated with cancer drug, study suggests
The painful symptoms of endometriosis -- a chronic condition which affects millions of women -- could potentially be reduced with a drug that had previously been investigated as a cancer treatment.
Supermarkets and child nutrition in Africa
Hunger and undernutrition are widespread problems in Africa. At the same time, overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases are also on the rise.
Pharmacy service will save NHS £651 million
A research team from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, and UCL evaluating a service delivered by pharmacists since 2011 have calculated it will save the English NHS around £651 million.
Breathing? Thank volcanoes, tectonics and bacteria
A Rice University study in Nature Geoscience suggests Earth's first burst of oxygen was added by a spate of volcanic eruptions brought about by tectonics.
Study examines the effects of weight loss surgery between pregnancies
New findings published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
novel bednet design improves safety, affordability and lethality to resistant mosquitoes
Researchers from LSTM have designed a new bednet that can kill mosquitoes more efficiently than existing nets, in a way that increases the choice of insecticide used, while minimising risk to the person inside the bednet.
The neurobiological basis of gender dysphoria
A new theory of gender dysphoria argues the symptoms of the condition are due to changes in network activity, rather than incorrect brain sex, according to work recently published in eNeuro.
New treatment for brain tumors uses electrospun fiber
University of Cincinnati professor Andrew Steckl, working with researchers from Johns Hopkins University, developed a new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive form of brain cancer.
Immunology -- Activation by breakdown
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers report that a central component of the innate immune response is activated by two short RNAs which are produced by site-specific cleavage of a precursor RNA molecule -- and both derivatives are generated by the same enzyme.
Face mask can help combat mild cases of sleep condition
A night time face mask can improve energy levels and vitality in people who suffer from the condition sleep apnea, which is associated with snoring and breathing problems at night.
Citizen scientists deserve more credit, researchers argue
In a paper published in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, a team led by biologist Dr Georgia Ward-Fear from Macquarie University in Australia and Dr Greg Pauly from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles argues that newfound respect for indigenous knowledge and changes in technology mean that non-professionals are taking greater roles in science work.
Micro implants could restore standing and walking
Researchers at the University of Alberta are focused on restoring lower-body function after severe spinal injuries using a tiny spinal implant.
New treatment could ease the passage of kidney stones
Researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a potential new treatment that could make passing kidney stones faster and less painful, and eliminate surgery.
Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers
The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation.
Major epilepsy study offers much-needed answers on 3 lifesaving seizure drugs
There are effective treatments to stop life-threatening epilepsy seizures when the initial treatment has failed, a sweeping new study reveals.
Most complete commercial sugarcane genome sequence has been assembled
Based on the information obtained from this latest whole-genome sequencing effort, researchers at the USP are developing tools for the genetic improvement of sugarcane and testing several candidate genes in Genetically Modified (GM) plants.
Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack
A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores.
Developing a new AI breast cancer diagnostic tool
Scientists are developing a new way to identify the unique chemical 'fingerprints' for different types of breast cancers.
Whaling and climate change led to 100 years of feast or famine for Antarctic penguins
New research reveals how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.
McGill-led research unravels mystery of how early animals survived ice age
How did life survive the most severe ice age? A McGill University-led research team has found the first direct evidence that glacial meltwater provided a crucial lifeline to eukaryotes during Snowball Earth, when the oceans were cut off from life-giving oxygen, answering a question puzzling scientists for years.
Climate change and human activities threatens picky penguins
Eating a krill-only diet has made one variety of Antarctic penguin especially susceptible to the impacts of climate change, according to new research involving the University of Saskatchewan (USask) which sheds new light on why some penguins are winners and others losers in their rapidly changing ecosystem.
Mechanism that triggers the inflammatory process by Mayaro virus is discovered
A Brazilian team at FAPESP-supported Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases identified the strategy used by immune cells to combat the pathogen Mayaro virus, which causes symptoms similar to those of chikungunya fever.
Human behaviour follows probabilistic inference patterns
According to a study published on Nov. 28 in Nature Communications by Philipp Schustek, Alexandre Hyafil and Rubén Moreno-Bote, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies.
SLAC scientists invent a way to see attosecond electron motions with an X-ray laser
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have invented a way to observe the movements of electrons with powerful X-ray laser bursts just 280 attoseconds, or billionths of a billionth of a second, long.
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned.
Drone images show Greenland ice sheet becoming more unstable as it fractures
The world's second-largest ice sheet, and the single largest contributor to global sea-level rise, is potentially becoming unstable because of fractures developing in response to faster ice flow and more meltwater forming on its surface.
Helping machines perceive some laws of physics
MIT researchers have designed a model that demonstrates an understanding of some basic ''intuitive physics'' about how objects should behave.
A question of pressure
The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has implemented a novel pressure measurement method, as a byproduct of the work on the 'new' kelvin.
Designing and repurposing cell receptors
EPFL scientists have developed a computational method modeling and designing protein allostery that allows the accurate and rational engineering and even repurposing of cell receptors.
Genomic gymnastics help sorghum plant survive drought
A new study provides the first detailed look at how the sorghum plant exercises exquisite control over its genome -- switching some genes on and some genes off at the first sign of water scarcity, and again when water returns -- to survive when its surroundings turn harsh and arid.
MBL team images the bacterial hitchhikers on plastic trash in ocean
Using an innovative microscopy method developed at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, scientists have revealed the structure of the microbial communities coating microplastic trash collected from a variety of ocean sites.
Käthe Beutler: 'Do something!'
Thousands of Jewish physicians were stripped of their rights and murdered by the Nazis.
Deep learning identifies molecular patterns of cancer
An artificial intelligence platform developed at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) can analyze genomic data extremely quickly, picking out key patterns to classify different types of colorectal tumors and improve the drug discovery process.
A new therapeutic target against diseases caused by lipid accumulation in cells
Researchers from the University of Barcelona (UB) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) found a new molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of the cholesterol movement in cells, an essential process for a proper cell functioning.
Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails
A team led by researchers from Osaka University have characterized a protein, called VSP, that keeps sperm swimming in straight lines.
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL published in Molecular Biology and Evolution.
Svalbard reindeer populations rebounding from centuries of hunting
As reindeer go, the animals living on the Norwegian arctic archipelago of Svalbard might not be Santa's first choice.
'Going negative': How Trump has changed the Twitter narrative
If not for Twitter, US President Donald Trump would not be in the White House today.

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