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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 04, 2019


Living at the edges
The clustering of protected habitats in the Americas near international borders makes many iconic, wide-ranging animals physically dependent on good relations between neighboring countries and wildlife-friendly borders.
Studies examine potential link between traffic-related air pollution and obesity in Mexican-Americans
Exposure to traffic pollution was associated with a higher risk of obesity in Mexican-American women, but not in men.
Permanent hair dye and straighteners may increase breast cancer risk
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products.
NRL, NASA combine to produce sun imagery with unprecedented clarity
Early returns from the US Naval Research Laboratory's camera on NASA's latest mission to study the Sun's corona revealed on Dec.
A new study reveals the function of corpora amylacea to remove brain waste substances
An article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describes a new pathway in the central nervous system to expel waste substances from the brain through the creation of corpora amylacea (CA), aggregates formed by glucose polymers amassing waste products.
Mapping the energy transport mechanism of chalcogenide perovskite for solar energy use
Researchers from Lehigh University have, for the first time, revealed first-hand knowledge about the fundamental energy carrier properties of chalcogenide perovskite CaZrSe3, important for potential solar energy use.
How plants harness 'bad' molecules for good ends
Researchers at Duke University show how plants harness toxic molecules called reactive oxygen species for the signaling pathway that gives rise to roots.
Cellular repair response to treadmill test can predict cardiac outcomes
The information gained from the changes in CPC counts during exercise may be more useful to cardiologists in risk stratifying these patients than the treadmill exercise test itself, the researchers say.
How to boost sales of fair trade and sustainable goods
When consumers are given responsibility for whether a product is produced, a stronger link develops between consumers and production that leads to anticipated feelings of guilt or gratification depending on the ethicality of the production process, which then influences purchase intentions.
Police killings of unarmed black Americans may have health impacts for nearby unborn black infants
Pregnant black women give birth to infants with smaller birth weights and shorter gestational ages if they live near the site of incidents in which unarmed blacks are killed by police during their first or second trimester, according to a new study.
Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database
Researchers have created the first comprehensive database of all the wildfire fuels that have been measured across North America.
Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users
Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study.
Does weight loss surgery affect colorectal cancer risk?
Although colorectal cancer is associated with obesity, it is unclear if weight loss surgery impacts the incidence of these tumors.
Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication
With the Law of Brevity in mind, researchers examined whether call amplitude, rather than call duration, might be the main factor by which animal vocal repertoires are optimized.
NASA finds wind shear battering tropical cyclone 07A
NASA's Aqua satellite found that wind shear was tearing at Tropical Storm 07A in the Arabian Sea.
Your zip software can calculate the complex physical quantity called entropy
A new Tel Aviv University study proposes a radically simple and efficient way of calculating the complex physical quantity known as entropy -- and it probably exists on your own computer.
Exposure to smoking in early childhood linked to hyperactivity and conduct problems
In a recent study published in Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, children exposed to smoking in the first four years of life were more likely to exhibit symptoms of hyperactivity and conduct problems.
Teens must 'get smart' about social media
New research indicates that social media is leading young adolescent girls and boys down a worrying path towards developing body image issues and eating disorder behaviours - even though they are smartphone savvy.
New cell models for ocular drug discovery
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed two new cell models that can open up new avenues for ocular drug discovery.
Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain
Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe that this holds true for all mammals.
Brewing beer that tastes fresh longer
Unlike wine, which generally improves with time, beer does not age well.
Patients' perspectives of clinical consultations related to weight
A recent review in Clinical Obesity assessed patients' reactions to consultations with physicians in which excess weight could have been or was discussed.
Cooking practices during pregnancy may affect hyperactivity in children
In pregnant women, exposure to cooking fumes was related to an increased risk of their children having hyperactivity behaviors at the age of 3 years.
How small is a small-world network?
This is the subject of a study published on 14 November in Nature Physics Communications by Gorka Zamora-López, a researcher at the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC), and Romain Brasselet, a researcher at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste (Italy).
Capital costs: Yale research offers truer calculation of 'footprint' of purchases
Researchers at Yale have created a model that enables more accurate calculations of the environmental footprints associated with a range of industrial processes -- and the products and services we purchase.
Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success.
Study examines sex differences in potential link between psoriasis and metabolic disorders
An analysis published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology revealed considerable sex differences when considering links between psoriasis and metabolic disorders.
A common insulin signaling pathway across cancer and diabetes
An oncology researcher has made an unexpected contribution to the understanding of type 2 diabetes.
Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life
In a new study published in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Yale University unveil a complete overhaul of the way species data is brought together and analyzed to construct an evolutionary tree of life for mammals.
Immigrants who naturalize outearn their peers
Looking at municipalities in Switzerland where citizenship applications were put to a popular vote, researchers identified immigrants who narrowly won or lost and tracked their earnings over the next several decades.
Non-adiabatic dynamics of strongly driven diffusive Josephson junctions
Researchers from the University of Paris-Saclay, the University of Regensburg (Germany) and the University of Jyvaskyla; (Finland) have delivered a combined experimental and theoretical work which reveal the profound nature of quantum transport in strongly driven diffusive Josephson junctions.
Social media use and disordered eating in young adolescents
New research published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders suggests that social media, particularly platforms with a strong focus on image posting and viewing, is associated with disordered eating in young adolescents.
Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine
For the first time, researchers have used a chip-based sensor with an integrated laser to detect very low levels of a cancer protein biomarker in a urine sample.
Genetic screen in worms reveals critical step in insulin synthesis
The identification of a protein important for insulin synthesis may hold clues for understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes.
ACR and EULAR release new classification criteria for IgG4-related disease
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) released the 2019 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria for IgG4-Related Disease.
Asia-wide genome mapping project reveals insights into Asian ancestry and genetic diversity
After a global genetic comparison, a team of international scientists has discovered that Asia has at least 10 ancestral lineages, whereas northern Europe has a single ancestral lineage.
Parker Solar Probe: 'We're missing something fundamental about the sun'
Our closest-ever look inside the sun's corona has unveiled an unexpectedly chaotic world that includes rogue plasma waves, flipping magnetic fields and distant solar winds under the thrall of the sun's rotation, according to University of Michigan researchers who play key roles in NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission.
Reprogramming inner ear to regrow hair cells promising target for hearing loss treatments
Mass. Eye and Ear scientists report the identification of a new pathway linked to cell division in the ear.
Brain diseases with molecular diversity
Parkinson's and multisystem atrophy (MSA) - both of them neurodegenerative diseases - are associated with the accumulation of alpha-synuclein proteins in the brain.
U-M researchers discover stress in early life extends lifespan
Some stress at a young age could actually lead to a longer life, new research shows.
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting.
Beta blocker use identified as hospitalization risk factor in 'stiff heart' heart failure
A new study links the use of beta-blockers to heart failure hospitalizations among those with the common 'stiff heart' heart failure subtype.
Once-a-month oral contraceptive could improve patient adherence
Researchers have created a new ingestible drug delivery platform that expands in the stomach and could safely deliver a contraceptive over one month when tested in pigs.
Studying water quality with satellites and public data
The researchers built a novel dataset of more than 600,000 matchups between water quality field measurements and Landsat imagery, creating a 'symphony of data.'
Molecular bodyguards against Parkinson's disease
Chaperone proteins in human cells dynamically interact with the protein α-Synuclein, which is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease.
NASA sees Tropical Storm 06A maintaining strength
NASA's Aqua satellite found some powerful storms in Tropical Storm 06A as it moved through the Arabian Sea toward Somalia.
Researchers discover a new, young volcano in the Pacific
Researchers from Tohoku University have discovered a new petit-spot volcano at the oldest section of the Pacific Plate.
Differences in replacement level fertility point to inequalities
The percentage of the world's population that is above or below the 'replacement level of fertility' has long been used as a measure of demographic development.
Adding copper strengthens 3D-printed titanium
Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications.
By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for training
People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study.
Incumbent CEOs working with new CFOs earn 10% more money
Researchers studied more than 20 years of data from S&P 1500 firms and found CEOs took home an average of 10% more compensation when working with a CFO who was hired after them, also known as a 'co-opted' CFO.
A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice
New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed.
Birds are shrinking as the climate warms
After 40 years of collecting birds that ran into Chicago buildings, scientists have been able to show that the birds have been shrinking as the climate's warmed up.
Getting to the 'art' of dementia: UC researchers highlight benefits of art intervention
University of Canberra researchers have shown that art gallery programs can improve the wellbeing of people living with dementia -- and they've backed it up by testing study participants' saliva.
A mouse model of prostate cancer bone metastasis in a syngeneic immunocompetent host
The research team reports the establishment of B6Ca P, an allograft tumor line from a Hi-Myc transgenic mouse that had been backcrossed onto C57BL/6J background.
How do world's smallest sea turtles become stranded in Cape Cod?
A computational analysis has surfaced new insights into the wind and water conditions that cause Kemp's ridley sea turtles to become stranded on beaches in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
Research in sheep suggests possible early test for fetal heart health
Changes in heart rate, due to low oxygen conditions, experienced by the fetus during pregnancy, could be used to predict the future heart health of babies, shows research published in The Journal of Physiology today.
Online therapy helped cardiovascular disease patients with depression
Researchers at Linköping University have developed a treatment for depression among people with cardiovascular disease.
Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking
Researchers in Finland are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light.
Sun's close-up reveals atmosphere hopping with highly energetic particles
On its first two flybys of the sun, the Princeton-led instrument IS?IS detected a surprising variety of activities by solar energetic particles -- the zippy electrons, protons and other ions that fly out in advance of the solar wind -- that can disrupt space travel and communications on Earth.
NASA's OSIRIS-REx in the midst of site selection
After a lengthy and challenging process, the team is finally ready to down-select from the four candidate sites to a primary and backup site.
NOTCH1 signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma via a TEL2/SERPINE1 axis
In this study, the research team investigated NOTCH1 mutations in keratinocyte lines derived from OSCC biopsies that had been subjected to whole exome sequencing.
WFIRM scientists push bioprinting capability forward
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are the first to report using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprising of multiple different functional materials.
Scientists detail how chromosomes reorganize after cell division
Researchers have discovered key mechanisms and structural details of a fundamental biological process--how a cell nucleus and its chromosomal material reorganizes itself after cell division.
3D model of human liver for better diagnosis
Dresden researchers create liver model for improved diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?
National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected.
First giant planet around white dwarf found
Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, found evidence of a giant planet associated with a white dwarf star.
A new way to measure long-term firm performance and shareholder value
INSEAD and Wharton introduce LIVA: a metric that gauges the true impact of investment or strategic action on shareholder value.
New study provides insight into chronic kidney disease
Researchers have further analyzed a known signaling pathway they believe brings them one step closer to understanding the complex physiology of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which might provide a path to new treatment options.
Controlling attention with brain waves
Having trouble paying attention? MIT neuroscientists may have a solution for you: Turn down your alpha brain waves.
NASA's Parker Solar Probe sheds new light on the sun
Since its 2018 launch, NASA's Parker Solar Probe (record-holder for closest-ever spacecraft to the Sun) has finished three of 24 planned passes through never-before-explored parts of the Sun's atmosphere.
Scientists have found out why photons flying from other galaxies do not reach the Earth
In the Universe there are extragalactic objects such as blazars, which very intensively generate a powerful gamma-ray flux, part of photons from this stream reaches the Earth, as they say, directly, and part -- are converted along the way into electrons, then again converted into photons and only then get to us.
Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes
New data from the Parker Solar Probe, which got closer to the sun than any other spacecraft, allowed physicists to map the source of a major component of the solar wind that continually peppers Earth.
Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows
UW researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains.
Finnish children's motor skills at the top in Europe
Data gathered in Finland, Belgium and Portugal reveal that Finnish children are ahead of their European peers in motor skills at ages 6 to 10 years.
Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions
Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study shows.
Impact of lifestyle behaviors in early childhood on obesity
Adhering to a healthy lifestyle at age 4 years is associated with a decreased risk of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity at 7 years, according to a study published in Pediatric Obesity.
District-level, real-time crime centers can help police cut crime levels
Police commanders often make decisions largely ad-hoc, based on whatever they hear about.
Are women getting adequate nutrition during preconception and pregnancy?
In a Maternal & Child Nutrition analysis of published studies on the dietary habits of women who were trying to conceive or were pregnant, most studies indicated that women do not meet nutritional recommendations for vegetable, cereal grain, or folate intake.
Contamination by metals can increase metabolic stress in mussels
The researchers propose that this evidence should be used as input to public policy with the aim of mitigating the impacts of human activities on coastal and marine ecosystems.
Common heart drugs linked with less heart damage from cancer therapy
Cancer patients receiving common heart drugs have less heart damage from cancer therapy, according to research presented today at EuroEcho 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit.
Properties of graphene change due to water and oxygen
Professor Sunmin Ryu and his research team investigated the oxidation-reduction principle of two-dimensional materials by interfacial diffusion.
Call for cooperation as 'blue boats' rob Pacific reefs
A flotilla of Vietnamese fishing boats with crews suffering in harsh conditions is stripping Pacific coral reefs of seafood as the poaching escalates to become an international human rights and security issue.
Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor
Little bits of black carbon littering the ocean floor, separate and distinct from the organic carbon believed to come from the ocean's surface.
Hidden giant planet revealed around tiny white dwarf star
The first evidence of a giant planet orbiting a dead white dwarf star has been found in the form of a disc of gas formed from its evaporating atmosphere.
Looking at tropical forests through new eyes
New University of Arizona-led science is using air-based maps of plant chemistry to improve carbon cycling models in hyperdiverse tropical forests.
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species
Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome.
A new gene involved in strawberry fruiting time is identified
The study, published by the University of Cordoba (Spain) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), takes a step further in understanding the mechanisms that control fruiting in strawberries.
Machine learning helps scientists measure important inflammation process
Inflammation is a hallmark of many health conditions, but quantifying how the underlying biology of inflammation contributes to specific diseases has been difficult.
Bullying others increases the risk of developing mental health problems and vice versa
A new study suggests there is a two-way relationship between bullying perpetration and mental health problems among U.S. youth.
Paying taxes less 'taxing' when we recognize how those dollars help others -- study
There's nothing certain in life except death and taxes. But taxpayers' support for the latter could potentially be improved, according to a new study led by SFU psychology researchers Emily Thornton and Lara Aknin.
The influence of alcohol consumption among cohabitating partners
Research has linked a partner's or spouse's drinking with changes in alcohol-related behaviors, but few studies have considered only cohabiting relationships.
Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply
India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University.
Closest-ever approach to the sun gives new insights into the solar wind
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind.
Stricter alcohol policies related to lower risk of cancer
In a new study, researchers at Boston Medical Center and Boston University have uncovered a new association between more restrictive alcohol policies and lower rates of cancer mortality.
New methodology developed at UPV to monitor patients with glioblastoma
The UPV methodology helps medical doctors know the patients' situation with greater precision; it allows them to obtain several vascular biomarkers directly linked to their survival.
Mindfulness training may help lower blood pressure, new study shows
A study at Brown University finds that mindfulness could reduce blood pressure by enhancing attention control, emotion regulation and self-awareness of both healthy and unhealthy habits.
Host cell proteases can process viral capsid proteins
It has long been suggested that a cell protease could take part in enterovirus infection.
Introducing peanuts and eggs early can prevent food allergies in high risk infants
Research undertaken by King's College London and St George's, University of London has found that introducing certain foods early to infants can prevent them from developing an allergy despite low adherence to an introduction regime.
Study shows lake methane emissions should prompt rethink on climate change
Study sheds new light on the impact of natural methane production on global climate change assessments.
Silverswords may be gone with the wind
In a new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Monographs, researchers seek to understand recent population declines of Haleakalā silverswords and identify conservation strategies for the future.
Medical marijuana cards often sought by existing heavy users
Young adults who seek enrollment in state medical marijuana programs are often those who already use heavily rather than those with mental or physical issues that could be addressed by the drug.
Sales of recreational marijuana in Denver found to increase some nonviolent crime
A new study evaluated the effect of recreational and medical marijuana dispensaries on crime in Denver.
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed.
First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis
A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their companions depending on their behaviour.
Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors
Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws -- and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier.
Depression affects one-third of lung cancer patients
About one-third of patients newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer have moderate to severe symptoms of depression, a new study suggests.
Drug decreases gut leakiness associated with ulcerative colitis
A research team led by biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found that a drug approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis can repair permeability defects in the gut's epithelium.
New tool to predict the global spread of dengue
Researchers at CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, QUT and Queensland Health have developed a new tool to predict the global spread of human infectious diseases, like dengue, and track them to their source.
How race is associated with differences among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Researchers in this observational study looked at how race was associated with difference in symptoms, access to care, genetic testing and clinical outcomes among 2,467 patients (8.3% black and 91.7% white) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition where the heart muscle becomes abnormally thick, which can make it harder to pump blood.
Rural women at higher risk of life-threatening pregnancy complications
Women in rural communities experience higher rates of life-threatening complications during or after childbirth than mothers in urban cities, a new study finds.
Hundreds of environmental health professionals in US report challenges, research needs
Hundreds of environmental health professionals across the nation report challenges and research needs in six areas -- drinking water, wastewater management, healthy homes, food safety, public health pests and emerging issues such as disaster risk reduction and new facility types for body art and cannabis-infused products.
Study finds young women in UK face unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis
Appendicitis is the most common general surgical emergency worldwide, but its diagnosis remains challenging.
Health care in baboons
Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate.
Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows
North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer.
How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling
That white rot fungi on fallen logs in a forest, it's super important.
Children with food allergies seen faster under new paediatric model
Children with food allergies are seen 10 months sooner and have fewer allergic reactions when treated by a paediatrician in their own community, a new study shows.
Liquid crystal polymer learns to move and grab objects
A specially conditioned liquid crystal polymer could be controlled with the power of light alone, with new potential applications in soft robotics.
Trends in Alzheimer's disease diagnoses across the United States
A recent analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society offers estimates of the changes in incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States, confirming previous reports of a declining trend.
Mobile stroke units could expedite treatment and improve patient outcomes in urban areas
Stroke patients received time-sensitive, lifesaving treatment approximately 30 minutes faster via an ambulance specially designed to treat stroke called a Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU).
New diagnostic techniques and drug may slow and even reverse cognitive decline from aging
When given the new drug to reduce inflammation, senile mice had fewer signs of dysfunctional brain electrical activity and were better able to learn new tasks, becoming almost cognitively adept as mice half their age.
New treatment to tackle drug-resistant strains of TB could now be possible
New drugs to treat strains of TB which have become resistant to treatment are now a possibility following a groundbreaking discovery from the University of Surrey.
Single dose of ketamine plus talk therapy may reduce alcohol use
A single infusion of ketamine plus behavioral therapy helped alcohol-dependent individuals reduce their drinking, a new study finds.
Which exercise regimen protects bone health in older adults with obesity?
Successful weight loss approaches in older adults with obesity can unfortunately lead to bone loss and an increased risk of fractures.
Suomi NPP satellite finds Kammuri weakening in South China Sea
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Kammuri on Dec.
Bone and muscle health can 'make or break' care as we age
Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work -- reported this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) -- can help yield hard evidence to address the range of 'soft tissue' and bone disorders that contribute to falls, fractures, and muscle loss as we age.
Water was a winner in capturing CO2
Reducing the level of CO2 in the atmosphere will almost certainly require carbon capture.
Researchers develop method to improve skeleton of common chemicals
It's incredibly difficult to make a carbocycle with more than five or six members.
Atom music lets listeners experience atomic world through sound
Atoms absorb and release energy in the form of photons that we perceive as different colors, which can be passed through a prism that reveals the atom's spectrum as colored lines.
Signs of life: New field guide aids astronomers' search
A Cornell University senior has come up with a way to discern life on exoplanets loitering in other cosmic neighborhoods: a spectral field guide.
Lung images of twins with asthma add to understanding of the disease
In a case study published today, researchers used a specialized MRI technique in a set of twins with asthma.
Researchers uncover early adherence step in intestinal transit of Shigella
The recent discovery of an early adherence step in the infection cycle could provide a new therapeutic target or even a new method for vaccine development.
Freeze frame: Scientists capture atomic-scale snapshots of artificial proteins
Scientists at Berkeley Lab are the first to use cryo-EM (cryogenic electron microscopy), a Nobel Prize-winning technique originally designed to image proteins in solution, to image atomic changes in a synthetic soft material.
Deep biomarkers of aging and longevity: From research to applications
The deep age predictors can help advance aging research by establishing causal relationships in nonlinear systems.
The gut may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis
It is incompletely understood which factors in patients with multiple sclerosis act as a trigger for the immune system to attack the brain and spinal cord.
Gulf of Mexico coral reefs to protect from storm surge in the future -- But will they?
LSU researcher Kristine DeLong uses 120,000-year-old fossils to predict how Gulf of Mexico coral reefs will respond to climate change toward the end of this century.
Scientists create 'epigenetic couch potato' mouse
A study in mice shows for the first time that epigenetics -- the molecular mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off -- plays a key role in determining an individual's innate drive to exercise.
New 'hyper glue' formula developed by UBCO and UVic researchers
With many of the products we use every day held together by adhesives, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus and the University of Victoria hope to make everything from protective clothing to medical implants and residential plumbing stronger and more corrosion resistant thanks to a newly-developed 'hyper glue' formula.
Targeted therapy better for repeat kidney cancer patients than FDA-approved counterpart
Kidney cancer patients who had already tried two or three different treatments had improved chances of preventing cancer progression with an experimental drug called tivozanib compared to an alternative approved by the FDA, reports a City of Hope-led study.
New technology CF LINK for protein bioconjugation and structural proteomics
CF Plus Chemicals, a spin-off of ETH Zurich, IOCB Prague, and IMIC have developed a new technology called CF LINK for site-selective bioconjugation of proteins and also their structural characterization.
Brachytherapy proves effective in treating skin cancer
The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy to treat elderly patients with common skin cancers offers excellent cure rates and cosmetic outcomes, according to a new study.
Atmospheric chemists move indoors
Most people spend the majority of their time at home, yet little is known about the air they breathe inside their houses.
Mobile devices blur work and personal privacy raising cyber risks, says QUT researcher
Organisations aren't moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace, warns a QUT privacy researcher.
All-optical diffractive neural networks process broadband light
Developed by researchers at UCLA, diffractive optical networks provide a low power, low latency and highly-scalable machine learning platform that can find numerous applications in robotics, autonomous vehicles, defense industry, among many others.
Patient diaries reveal propensity for epileptic seizures
A Rice alumna and her statistician mentor receive the first validation of their tool to assess patients' histories to identify periods of heightened propensity for epileptic seizures.
Dangerous skin tumor now has treatment guidelines
A new study reports the first guidelines for treating sebaceous carcinoma, a cancer of the oil glands.
Study prompts call for disaster-specific pharmacy legislation
Pharmacists caught up in the Australian bushfire crisis are being hampered from providing timely and effective treatment to displaced people due to outdated laws, according to QUT researchers.
A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics
Harvard University researchers have demonstrated the first material that can have both strongly correlated electron interactions and topological properties, which not only paves the way for more stable quantum computing but also an entirely new platform to explore the wild world of exotic physics.

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