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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 05, 2019


Wind and water
Damaging rains from hurricanes can be more intense after winds begin to subside, say UC Santa Barbara scientists.
Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences describe 71 new species in 2019
From geckos to goblin spiders, flowering plants, and Mediterranean ants -- spanning five continents and three oceans -- these 71 new species described by Academy scientists grow Earth's tree of life.
A biology boost
Assistance during the first years of a biology major leads to higher retention of first-generation students.
First of its kind study seeks to answer whether effects of 'abortion pill' can be reversed
Women who initiate medical abortion but opt to stop in the middle of treatment may be at risk for serious blood loss, a UC Davis Health study finds.
Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion
Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion, and this information transfer is at least partially mediated by a brain region called the anterior cingulate cortex, according to a study published Dec.
NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events
Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space.
Prenatal and early life exposure to multiple air pollutants increases odds of toddler allergies
A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows a significant association between multiple prenatal and early life exposures to indoor pollutants and the degree of allergic sensitivity in 2-year-olds.
Weight for it: Time-restricted eating benefits those at risk for diabetes, heart disease
Researchers from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies reported a form of intermittent fasting, called time-restricted eating, improved the health of study participants who had been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.
Microwave treatment is an inexpensive way to clean heavy metals from treated sewage
A team of Florida State University researchers studying new methods to remove toxic heavy metals from biosolids -- the solid waste left over after sewage treatment -- found the key is a brief spin through a microwave.
What does DNA's repair shop look like? New research identifies the tools
A team of scientists has identified how damaged DNA molecules are repaired inside the human genome, a discovery that offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA.
Animals that evolved in low-disturbance areas more 'sensitive' to modern disruption
Animal species that have evolved, and survived, in low-disturbance environments -- with little interruption from glaciation, fires, hurricanes, or anthropogenic clearing -- are more sensitive to modern forest fragmentation, report Matthew Betts and colleagues.
Cell phone injuries
Cell phones are mainstays of daily life. This observational study analyzed 20 years of data on people who went to emergency departments with head and neck injuries from cell phone use to estimate the number of injuries, learn what types of injuries there were, and understand how the injuries occurred, such as from distracted driving or walking.
Developing a digital twin
In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles delivering packages, maybe even people, from location to location.
Recruitment of miR-8080 by luteolin inhibits AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer
Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have a poor clinical response to drugs for CRPC, including enzalutamide.
A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the world's most intractable pollutants
Colorado State University engineers have developed a treatment train for a PFAS compound called HFPO-Dimer Acid, also known by its trade name, GenX.
Ratcheting up NBA rookie salaries may incentivize athletes to finish college
In a paper for the 'International Journal of Sport Finance' Barbara Arel and Michael J.
NASA tracking Tropical Storm 06A through Arabian Sea
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Arabian Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm 06A, now renamed Tropical Storm Pawan.
St. Michael's Hospital study examines the relationship between sugars and heart health
There's an assumption that sugars are all bad, but a study led by researchers at St.
Gulf Coast corals face catastrophe
Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research.
The Lancet Global Health: Half of WHO-recommended policies to reduce chronic diseases are not put into practice
The first analysis of WHO-recommended policies to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) finds that implementation is slowly improving, but on average just over half get no further than being endorsed, according to results from 151 countries published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
Researchers: Put a brake on bioenergy by 2050 to avoid negative climate impacts
A peer-reviewed assessment cautions that ramping up bioenergy projects requiring large stretches of land could send renewable energy sector down an unsustainable path.
Whales may owe their efficient digestion to millions of tiny microbes
A study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that the microbial communities inside whales may play an important role in the digestion of one of the ocean's most abundant carbon-rich lipids, known as a wax ester.
Genome testing for siblings of kids with autism may detect ASD before symptoms appear
One of the key priorities of interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is starting early, with some evidence showing infants as young as seven months old could benefit.
Changing wildfires in the California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks
Research in the journal Biological Conservation, published by Elsevier, suggests fire, as it becomes more frequent and severe, poses a substantial risk to goshawks in the Sierra Nevada region.
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming -- study
Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects -- a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals.
Physical forces affect bacteria's toxin resistance, study finds
A random conversation between two Cornell researchers at a child's birthday party led to a collaboration and new understanding of how bacteria resist toxins, which may lead to new tools in the fight against harmful infections.
UConn researchers draw an evolutionary connection between pregnancy and cancer metastasis
Pregnancy might hold the key to understanding how cancer metastasizes in various mammals -- including humans, according to UConn and Yale researchers.
Preterm birth linked to increased rates of diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females
New research shows that preterm birth is linked to increased rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females.
How gene mutation causes autism and intellectual disability
Scientists have discovered why a specific genetic mutation causes intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder in children.
SWOG study confirms new prognostic markers for triple negative breast cancer
Physicians who treat patients with triple negative breast cancer have two new ways to predict which patients may benefit most from the well-established post-surgery treatment known as AC chemotherapy, short for adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide.
Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage illuminated
The important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage has been revealed.
How extreme environmental conditions affect the human brain
Members of a polar research expedition have provided researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development with an opportunity to study the effects of social isolation and extreme environmental conditions on the human brain.
NASA finds tropical cyclone 02S consolidating
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical cyclone 02S and the visible image showed that the storm was getting better organized.
Next generation of CAR-T cells possible
A new approach to programing cancer-fighting immune cells called CAR-T cells can prolong their activity and increase their effectiveness against human cancer cells grown in the laboratory and in mice, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
A robot and software make it easier to create advanced materials
A Rutgers-led team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health.
PET scans show Transcendental Meditation with cardiac rehabilitation increases blood flow to the heart
Study finds coronary heart disease (CHD) patients who include Transcendental Meditation (TM) with cardiac rehabilitation (CR) increased blood flow to the heart by 20.7%.
Stanford scientists reliably predict people's age by measuring proteins in blood
Protein levels in people's blood can predict their age, a Stanford study has found.
Potential cause of elevated nighttime blood pressure in patients with apnea identified
University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found a potential cause for elevated nighttime blood pressure that may help patients with OSA get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.
Chronic disease prevention could ease opioid crisis
Preventing chronic disease could help curb the opioid epidemic, according to research from the University of Georgia.
Forest fragmentation hits wildlife hardest in the tropics
Animals that evolved in environments subject to large-scale habitat-altering events like fires and storms are better equipped to handle forest fragmentation caused by human development than species in low-disturbance environments.
Warm-sector heavy rainfall in China: Studies and challenges
Warm-sector heavy rainfall (WSHR) events often cause severe flooding, huge economic losses, and many casualties, but the operational prediction of these events is difficult and often inaccurate.
Can Arctic 'ice management' combat climate change?
According to a much-debated geo-engineering approach, both sea-ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by using millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter.
'virtual biopsy' allows doctors to accurately diagnose precancerous pancreatic cysts
A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds a new diagnostic method that provides doctors with a 'virtual biopsy' that allows them to definitively diagnose cysts in the pancreas and eliminate those that pose a risk of cancer.
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research.
Three types of cells help the brain tell day from night
Researchers at the Salk Institute report the discovery of three cell types in the eye that detect light and align the brain's circadian rhythm to our ambient light.
Water animation gets easier thanks to BYU professors
A team of computer science professors at BYU created a method to quickly resize animations of fluids without having to completely re-simulate the entire sequence.
New report: Teacher effectiveness has a dramatic effect on student outcomes
A new IZA World of Labor report publishing tomorrow, Dec.
Graphene takes off in composites for planes and cars
The Graphene Flagship brought together top European researchers and companies to discuss the most disruptive ways graphene could enhance composites used in the aerospace, automotive and energy industries.
Patients at risk because NHS hospitals using different record-keeping systems
A major survey of medical record keeping in the NHS has revealed critical deficiencies that could risk patients' safety.
Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve esophageal cancer survival rates
A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of esophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a UCL-led study published in Lancet Digital Health.
Kidney patients report positive experiences with novel approach to dialysis access
A new study reports high levels of patient satisfaction with a minimally invasive approach to creating vascular access for kidney patients who require hemodialysis.
Brain differences detected in children with depressed parents
The largest brain imaging study of children ever conducted in the United States has revealed structural differences in the brains of those whose parents have depression.
Long-term study finds faster breast cancer radiation treatment as effective as long course
Approximately half of the patients were randomly assigned whole breast radiation, delivered once per day over 3 to 5 weeks.
Artificial cells act more like the real thing
Protocells -- artificial cells -- that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers.
Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered
A fundamental change in our understanding of the childhood kidney cancer Wilms' tumor is on the horizon, after the discovery of its earliest genetic root by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators.
Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon
Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields.
The Lancet Public Health: One in two people who are homeless may have experienced a traumatic brain injury in their lifetime
This systematic review and first meta-analysis on the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in people who are homeless or in unstable housing situations -- including 38 studies published between 1995 and 2018, and published in The Lancet Public Health journal -- suggests that homeless people experience a disproportionately high lifetime prevalence of TBI.
Can 3D-printing musical instruments produce better sound than traditional instruments?
Music is an art, but it is also a science involving vibrating reeds and strings, sound waves and resonances.
Cancer treatment for patients with HIV
For patients with HIV, CD4 counts reflect the health of their immune system and HIV RNA levels indicate their viral load.
Behavioral interventions may be as effective at reducing food intake as anorectic drugs
Simulations predict that behavioral interventions such as imposing strict no-food restrictions after meals can be as effective as strong anorectic drugs in reducing food intake in rodents, according to a study published Dec.
Bats may benefit from wildfire
Bats face many threats -- from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome.
As China rapidly adopts clean energy, use of traditional stoves persists
Old habits are hard to break. A McGill-led study of replacement of traditional wood and coal burning stoves with clean energy in China suggests that, without a better understanding of the reasons behind people's reluctance to give up traditional stoves, it will be difficult for policies in China and elsewhere in the world to succeed in encouraging this shift towards clean energy.
Between arousal and inhibition
Why nerve cells in the brain process information differently.
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Ambali rapidly intensifying
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Ambali and the visible image showed that the storm was rapidly intensifying.
'Junk DNA' affects inherited cancer risk
A person's risk of developing cancer is affected by genetic variations in regions of DNA that don't code for proteins, previously dismissed as 'junk DNA', according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Friday).
What is a scream? The acoustics of a primal human call
Listeners show strong agreement for parameters of a scream, including a higher pitch, roughness and a higher peak frequency.
New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application
'We hope Uniqprimer and the tests it designed will aid in the accurate detection of D. dianthicola and many other pathogens,' said lead author Shaista Karim.
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study.
Fighting bacterial infection with drug-eluting medical devices
Medical practitioners routinely outfit patients with devices ranging from cardiovascular stents, pacemakers, catheters, and therapeutic lenses to orthopedic, breast, dental, and cochlear implants and prostheses.
Immune system can be coaxed into selecting key antibodies to fight HIV
Researchers have cleared a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine, proving in animal models that effective, yet short-lasting antibodies can be coaxed into multiplying as a fighting force against the virus
Technique shows how individual cancer cells react to drugs
sci-Plex, a new cell-response screening method, pools genetically different cells and shows what happens to individual cells when the sample is treated, such as with cancer drugs.
'Buildings' in human bone may hold key to stronger 3D-printed lightweight structures
The discovery of how a 'beam' in human bone material handles a lifetime's worth of wear and tear could translate to the development of 3D-printed lightweight materials that last long enough for more practical use in buildings, aircraft and other structures.
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules
A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province.
Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties
Ommochromes, the pigments that color the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.
New study hints at complex decision making in a single-cell organism
In an effort to replicate an experiment conducted over a century ago, researchers at Harvard Medical School present evidence confirming at least one single-cell organism -- the trumpet-shaped Stentor roeselii -- exhibits a hierarchy of avoidance behaviors.
Accelerated PBI not equivalent, but close, to WBI to control ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence
Long-term results from the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 comparing whole-breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) indicated that, although the absolute difference between treatment was less than 1%, APBI did not meet the criteria for equivalence to WBI in controlling ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy.
Young people with IBD five times more likely to develop serious infections
Young patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are five times more likely than the general population to develop viral infections that can lead to hospitalisation or permanent organ damage, a new study published in the UEG Journal has found.
Study finds wide county-level variation in rates of surgery for early-stage lung cancer
A new study finds more than two-fold differences between counties with the lowest and highest rates of surgery for patients with early stage lung cancer, with socioeconomic and healthcare delivery factors contributing to the gap.
How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5 million project
The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease in both dogs and humans.
Researchers develop open source EEG visualization tool
Researchers at UT have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder.
A momentous view on the birth of photoelectrons
The creation of photoelectrons through ionisation is one of the most fundamental processes in the interaction between light and matter.
Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated
Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bispehnol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed.
Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops
Identifying genes that confer resistance to leaf rust infections could help generate durably resistant cereal crops.
More than a watchdog
Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body.
Mouse study shows nerve signaling pathway critical to healing fractures
Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but healing them requires the production of a protein signal that stimulates the generation, growth and spread of vital nerve cells, or neurons, throughout the injured area.
Using lungs from increased-risk donors expands donor pool, maintains current survival rates
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that using lungs from donors who are considered high risk for certain infectious diseases compared to standard risk donors results in similar one-year survival for recipients.
Cellphone distraction linked to increase in head injuries
Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise -- and correlates with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, a Rutgers study found.
Gay, bisexual men increasingly agree: HIV 'undetectable equals untransmittable'
Extensive evidence from HIV prevention research studies has firmly established that 'Undetectable Equals Untransmittable,' or U=U.
Gene network sparks future autism treatment
A mutated gene found in people with intellectual disabilities that could be targeted for treatment has been identified by an international team including University of Queensland researchers.
Preterm births more likely when dads live in lower income areas
Lifelong lower socioeconomic status of fathers, as defined by early life and adulthood neighborhood income, is a newly identified risk factor for early preterm birth (at less than 34 weeks), according to a study published in Maternal and Child Health Journal.
Clinical study finds eating within 10-hour window may help stave off diabetes, heart disease
Researchers from the Salk Institute and the UC San Diego School of Medicine found that a 10-hour time-restricted eating intervention, when combined with traditional medications, resulted in weight loss, reduced abdominal fat, lower blood pressure and cholesterol for participants.
Taming chronic inflammation may reduce illness, save lives
Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide.
Domestic abuse survivors twice at risk of long-term illnesses
Female survivors of domestic abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, shows a study by the universities of Birmingham and Warwick.
First investigational drug therapy for liver disease NASH awaiting FDA approval
Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a chronic liver disease and a leading cause for liver transplantation in the US, currently lack an approved drug therapy, but this may soon change.
First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a sunnier side of climate change
Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.
Immune checkpoint therapy for ER+ breast cancers, a missed opportunity?
A subset of endocrine therapy-resistant luminal B breast cancers activates immune responses that could be amenable to manipulation with immunotherapy.
OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu
Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu.
Biochemical model enhances power to predict MicroRNA targeting
Through millions of affinity measurements, researchers have developed a biochemical model that reveals novel insights into microRNAs, which function in part to silence gene expression, but other biological functions of which are unknown.
Fusion by strong lasers
Nuclear physics usually involves high energies, as illustrated by experiments to master controlled nuclear fusion.
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous.
New instrument extends LIGO's reach
Technology 'squeezes' out quantum noise so more gravitational wave signals can be detected.
Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains.
Scientist identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes
Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance.
Study finds little increased risk of injury in high-intensity functional training program
High-intensity group workout classes are increasingly popular at fitness centers.
Bystanders can help more cardiac arrest victims survive
Only 8% of Americans survive cardiac arrest outside a hospital, but that percentage could increase significantly if bystanders recognize cardiac arrest and perform simple lifesaving tasks, a UVA Health physician says in a New England Journal of Medicine article.
The Lancet: First long-term estimates suggest link between cholesterol levels and risk of heart disease and stroke
The observational and modelling study which used individual-level data from almost 400,000 people, published in The Lancet, extends existing research because it suggests that increasing levels of non-HDL cholesterol may predict long-term cardiovascular risk by the age of 75 years.
Machine learning, imaging technique may boost colon cancer diagnosis
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a new imaging technique based on a technology that has been used for two decades in ophthalmology that can provide accurate, real-time, computer-aided diagnosis of colorectal cancer.
Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins
Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.
Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises
A new effective treatment of hepatitis C not only combats the virus, but is also effective against potentially fatal complications such as reduced liver functioning and cirrhosis.
Concordia research shows that using green products leads to a warm glow in shoppers
A new paper out of Concordia's John Molson School of Business suggests that spending some of that money on green products might make consumers feel quite a bit better about their purchases.
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia.
New protein function could be key to treatment of drug addiction and behavioral disorders
The reward pathway of the brain causes feelings of happiness but is also involved in behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and addiction.
Modern technology and old-fashioned legwork solve science mystery
Researchers hope put to rest a century-old scientific debate by demonstrating that the low-level organism S. roeseli is capable of decision making.
Insilico publishes a review of deep aging clocks and announces the issuance of key patent
Insilico Medicine announced the publication of a comprehensive review of the deep biomarkers of aging and the publication of a granted patent titled 'Deep transcriptomic markers of human biological aging and methods of determining a biological aging clock.'
Bile duct biomarker? Protein found to pinpoint patients with a lethal cancer
Patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a form of bile duct cancer, have a poor prognosis.
Ecology: Wildfire may benefit forest bats
Bats respond to wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in varied but often positive ways, a study in Scientific Reports suggests.
Finding meaning in 'Rick and Morty,' one burp at a time
One of the first things viewers of 'Rick and Morty' might notice about Rick is his penchant for punctuating his speech with burps.
Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes
More than 100 years ago, zoologist Herbert Spencer Jennings described surprisingly varied avoidance behaviors in the single-celled freshwater protist Stentor roeseli.
Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds
An important tool for monitoring seabird populations involves acoustic sensors deployed at nesting sites to record sounds over long periods of time.
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the same way, a few specific strategies appeared time and time again.
NASA analyzes Kammuri's heavy rainfall    
NASA provided analyses of Typhoon Kammuri's heavy rainfall on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean using the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite.
Your food may help make stickier, safer glues for laptops, packaging, furniture
A group of scientists at Purdue University has taken inspiration from the field, kitchen and the ocean to create strong glues.
Dramatic rise in patients 'cured' of heart condition after GP performance pay scheme
The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost 5-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been 'cured'.
Obesity surgery improves the heart
The benefits of bariatric surgery for obese individuals go beyond weight loss, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Scientists see defects in potential new semiconductor
A research team has reported seeing, for the first time, atomic scale defects that dictate the properties of a new and powerful semiconductor.
Detailed insight into stressed cells
When cells are stressed, they initiate a complex and precisely regulated response to prevent permanent damage.
How much will we eat in the future?
The amount of food needed to feed the world's population in the future is of vital importance.
Imaging of conjunctival goblet cells helps diagnosis of dry eyes
Professor Ki Hean Kim and his research team developed the world's first biometric imaging of conjunctival goblet cells with high definition.
Older adults who 'train' for a major operation spend less time in the hospital
Older adults who 'train' for a major operation by exercising, eating a healthy diet, and practicing stress reduction techniques preoperatively have shorter hospital stays and are more likely to return to their own homes afterward rather than another facility, compared with similar patients who do not participate in preoperative rehabilitation, according to research findings.
Pilot study finds time-restricted eating has benefits for people at risk for diabetes
In a study publishing Dec. 5 in the journal Cell Metabolism, researchers for the first time looked at the effects of TRE in people who had been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and therefore were at a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.
Study shows first signs of cross-talk between RNA surveillance and silencing systems
Scientists in Korea find a protein that mediates the interaction between the cellular systems involved in rapid responses against foreign genes in plants.

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