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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 11, 2019


Social media contributes to increased perception of food technology as risky business
Nowhere is this more evident than consumers' mistrust of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), despite assurances from the scientific community and food experts.
Modulation of proliferation factors in lung adenocarcinoma with an analysis of the transcriptional consequences of genomic EGFR activation
Molecular subtypes based on copy number, DNA methylation, and mRNA expression had variable proliferation levels, the highest correlating with decreased survival.
Study finds association between poor diet, age-related macular degeneration
Participants who ate a diet high in red and processed meat, fried food, refined grains and high-fat dairy were three times more likely to develop late-stage age-related macular degeneration.
C. diff carriers are common source of infections in health facilities, study shows
Nearly one in 10 patients admitted to a New York hospital with no symptoms of diarrhea were found to be carriers of Clostridioides difficile (C. diff), suggesting infections originate outside the hospital setting more often than thought, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Vesicles released by bacteria may reduce the spread of HIV in human tissues
Nano-sized vesicles released by certain bacteria that inhabit the vagina may protect against HIV infection, suggests a study of human cells and tissues by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and the University of Bologna, Italy.
Artificial intelligence boosts MRI detection of ADHD
Deep learning, a type of artificial intelligence, can boost the power of MRI in predicting attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study.
Tucatinib 'game changing' against HER2+ breast cancer, especially with brain metastases
Phase III results at NEJM and SABCS: Adding tucatinib to standard of care treatment nearly tripled one-year progression-free survival.
Study of elephant, capybara, human hair finds that thicker hair isn't always stronger
Despite being four times thicker than human hair, elephant hair is only half as strong -- that's just one finding from researchers studying the hair strength of many different mammals.
Tropical flower offers potential new route for treating pancreatic cancer
An international team of scientists led by the University of Bath have made drug-like molecules inspired by a chemical found in a tropical flower, that they hope could in the future help to treat deadly pancreatic cancer.
Insights into psoriasis suggest a new treatment target
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have uncovered a novel pathway that may explain why skin thickens in psoriasis and suggests new strategies for developing therapies for the condition.
New material design tops carbon-capture from wet flue gases
Chemical engineers at EPFL have designed a material that can capture carbon dioxide from wet flue gasses better than current commercial materials.
Risk analysis critical tool for combating human trafficking
Risk analysis is a critical tool for combating human trafficking and is central to informing global policy recommendations and assisting with targeted local and organizational efforts.
Researchers discover brain circuit linked to food impulsivity
A team of researchers that includes a faculty member at the University of Georgia has now identified a specific circuit in the brain that alters food impulsivity.
One-third of recent global methane increase comes from tropical Africa
One-third of recent global methane increase comes from tropical Africa.
Training middle-school educators to identify suicide warning signs
New research from Case Western Reserve University examined the impact of virtual training on the mental-health and suicide-prevention skills of more than 33,000 middle-school educators.
State of shock: 200-year-old law about gas mixtures called into question
According to a new study led by a team from The University of New Mexico, centuries-old laws about the behavior of gas mixtures do not apply in the presence of shock waves.
Information technology can save police lives, according to a new study
Police officers face well-documented risks, with more than 50,000 a year assaulted on the job in the United States.
Study to help manage shark populations in Pacific Panama
A study in Pacific Panama identifies 11 potential nursery areas of locally common and migratory sharks, which could support shark conservation efforts in the region.
Pathways toward post-petrochemistry
Ethylene, or ethene, is a primary feedstock for the chemical industry, including as a starting material for the production of a wide variety of plastics.
Recommendations for responding to the Fridays for Future movement
The level of public concern about climate change has risen significantly in recent years.
Novel respiratory cell changes identified from cigarette smoke exposure
Cigarette smoking changes the types of cells that are present in the respiratory track and some biological processes necessary for detoxification of cigarette smoke are restricted to specific types of cells.
Training the brain: resilience program helps student-athletes adjust to college life
In newly published research, a unique and expanding program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has been shown to improve decision-making and emotional awareness, lower perceived stress and build resilience among diverse and sometimes at-risk college athletes.
Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia.
Study reveals rapid increases in cannabis use among individuals with depression
Results of a new study suggest that over the past decade (2005-2017), the prevalence of cannabis use in the United States has increased among persons with and without depression, though the increase is significantly more rapid among those with depression.
MASS: An integrative software program for streamlined morphometric analyses of leaves
Analysis of leaf shape is crucial in answering a variety of ecological, evolutionary, genetic, and agricultural questions.
Real-time photoacoustic thermometry of tumors during HIFU treatment in living subjects
The research team led by Professor Chulhong Kim of POSTECH(Pohang University of Science and Technology) developed a photoacoustic thermometry system combined with a clinical ultrasound imaging platform to effectively guide the high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.
Helping plant nurseries reduce runoff
Researchers identify production strategies to help manage phosphorus.
Focus on food security and sustainability
The number of malnourished people is increasing worldwide. More than two billion people suffer from a lack of micronutrients.
New study and pilot curriculum trains students to provide complex care
In 2014, Jefferson launched a pilot curriculum to build interdisciplinary teams to reach out to high-need patients and attempt to find low-cost, high-touch ways to reduce their recurrent difficulties.
Advancing frozen food safety: Cornell develops novel food safety assessment tool
New research funded by the Frozen Food Foundation developed a modeling tool to assist the frozen food industry with understanding and managing listeriosis risks.
Your genes aren't the only factor dictating Alzheimer's risk, says Baycrest-U of T study
In the first study published about Alzheimer's disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed Alzheimer's while one did not, according to recently published results in the journal Brain.
Earth was stressed before dinosaur extinction
By measuring the chemistry of fossilized seashells collected in Antarctica, researchers discovered that Earth was already experiencing carbon cycle instability before the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.
Human consumption of fish antibiotics investigated in new study
Consumers seeking cheaper, faster access to antibiotics may be consuming antibiotics intended for treating fish rather than humans, according to research presented at the ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists) 54th Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition.
New study identifies barriers to conservation success
Inability to find or retain skilled staff and issues around local community buy-in are just some of the hurdles preventing conservation charities from achieving their goals, a ground-breaking new study has found.
Print me an organ -- Why are we not there yet?
SUTD leads in-depth review on the impending reality of 3D printed organs and analyses recent accomplishments, limitations and opportunities for future research.
Punching holes in opaque solar cells turns them transparent
Researchers in Korea have found an effective and inexpensive strategy to transform solar cells from opaque to transparent.
NRL-camera aboard NASA spacecraft confirms asteroid phenomenon
A US Naval Research Laboratory-built camera mounted on the NASA Parker Solar Probe revealed an asteroid dust trail that has eluded astronomers for decades.
How light a foldable and long-lasting battery can be?
The research team led by Professor Soojin Park developed a three-dimensional monolithic organic battery electrode.
Efforts to end the HIV epidemic must not ignore people already living with HIV
Efforts to prevent new HIV transmissions in the US must be accompanied by addressing HIV-associated comorbidities to improve the health of people already living with HIV, NIH experts assert in the third of a series of JAMA commentaries.
New technique to determine protein structures may solve biomedical puzzles
Researchers in Dana-Farber's cBio Center have now demonstrated a powerful 'experimental evolution' method to discover details of protein shape and function, and the method may find uses across a very broad spectrum of biomedical research.
Study sheds light on 'overlooked' bee species
The UK's first citizen science project focusing on solitary, ground-nesting bees has revealed that they nest in a far broader range of habitats than previously thought.
Increasing transparency in the healthcare sector: More might not be better
More isn't always better. That's what researchers say when it comes to transparency in the US healthcare system.
Government regimes may be learning new Twitter tactics to quash dissent
When protesters use social media to attract attention and unify, people in power may respond with tweeting tactics designed to distract and confuse, according to a team of political scientists.
Diet, not exercise, may be key to addressing our biggest cause of liver disease
Edith Cowan University researchers have found that a chronic disease affecting up to 80 per cent of overweight people may be causing an iron deficiency that simply leaves them too tired to get off the couch.
Illinois team develops first of a kind in-vitro 3D neural tissue model
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully used stem cells to engineer living biohybrid nerve tissue to develop 3D models of neural networks with the hopes of gaining a better understanding of how the brain and these networks work.
There's a new squid in town
Researchers in OIST's Molecular Genetics Unit, in collaboration with a researcher from Australia, have identified a new species of bobtail squid inhabiting Okinawa's waters -- dubbed Euprymna brenneri.
Mountain goats' air conditioning is failing, study says
A new study in the journal PLOS One says Glacier National Park's iconic mountain goats are in dire need of air conditioning.
Low-dose aspirin may not help African-Americans prevent heart attack
Use of daily, low-dose aspirin in persons without known cardiovascular disease was lower among blacks than whites.
BU finds concerns about other painkillers contributed to opioid crisis
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in JAMA Network Open shows that the decline in prescriptions of non-opioid analgesics -- largely NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors -- in the early 2000s coincided with a marked increase in opioid prescribing.
Stanford scientists pry apart party drug's therapeutic, addictive qualities
Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have succeeded in distinguishing the molecular pathway responsible for an illicit drug's abuse potential from the one behind its propensity to make people feel sociable.
Tsoi lives in Malaysian forests
Sergey Ermilov, a researcher from Tyumen State University, discovered and described a new species of oribatid mites that lives on the forest floors in Malaysia.
Site search: A digital approach to proteins and cancer
What if scientists could create more effective drugs to treat cancers and other diseases by better targeting specific sites on proteins in the body?
New research pinpoints which of the world's trees are climate-ready
'Penny-pinching' evergreen species such as Christmas favourites, holly and ivy, are more climate-ready in the face of warming temperatures than deciduous 'big-spending' water consumers like birch and oak.
Plant researchers examine bread aroma: Modern and old wheat varieties taste equally good
Bread baked from modern wheat varieties are just as aromatic as that baked from old varieties.
ALMA spots most distant dusty galaxy hidden in plain sight
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have spotted the light of a massive galaxy seen only 970 million years after the Big Bang.
A research team develop biotransistors able to hear small beats of live
Experts at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), in collaboration with the Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), have achieved a new milestone.
US Feed the Future program reduces stunting of children in Africa, Stanford study finds
Feed the Future, the US government's global hunger and food security initiative, has prevented 2.2 million children from experiencing malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found.
Immune outposts inside kidney tumors predict post-surgery outcomes
Patients with well-supported immune cells in their tumors are more likely to control their cancers' growth for a longer time, an observation that could guide treatment decisions after surgery for kidney cancer.
Paleontology: Experiments in evolution
A new find from Patagonia sheds light on the evolution of large predatory dinosaurs.
Adding tucatinib to drug combination extends survival for advanced HER2+ breast cancer patients
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported study results showing the addition of tucatinib to capecitabine (Xeloda) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, with and without brain metastasis according to results of the HER2CLIMB clinical trial.
Take long naps? Sleep more than nine hours a night? Your stroke risk may be higher
People who take long naps during the day or sleep nine or more hours at night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published in the Dec.
Local traditional knowledge can be as accurate as scientific transect monitoring
New research from a cross-organizational consortium in the Amazon has found indigenous knowledge to be as accurate as scientific transect monitoring.
High school student publishes scientific paper with assistance from Texas Tech professor
David Weindorf collaborated with Florida teenager Julia Kagiliery to determine the sulfur content of lignite coal using portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and an optical color sensor.
New research seeks to improve safety equipment for pregnant women
As technology advances in the things we use every day, it's generally accepted they also become safer.
Fiber-optic cables capture thunderquake rumbles
Underground fiber-optic cables, like those that connect the world through phone and internet service, hold untapped potential for monitoring severe weather, according to scientists at Penn State.
Hyperactive FOXA1 reprograms endocrine-resistant breast cancer to become metastatic
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Harvard Medical School has unveiled a novel mechanism that helps explain how endocrine-resistant breast cancer acquires metastatic behavior, opening the possibility of new therapeutic strategies.
Scientists eager to explain brain rhythm boost's broad impact in Alzheimer's models
In a new review paper, MIT neuroscientists lay out the the few knowns and many unknowns that must be understood to determine why sensory stimuluation of 40Hz brain rhythms have broad effects, particularly in Alzheimer's models.
The right mouse model is crucial for Huntington's disease drug development
Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable and fatal hereditary disease.
Revealing the physics of the Sun with Parker Solar Probe
Nearly a year and a half into its mission, Parker Solar Probe has returned gigabytes of data on the Sun and its atmosphere.
Isotope analysis points to prisoners of war
Maya archaeologists from the University of Bonn found the bones of about 20 people at a water reservoir in the former Maya city of Uxul (Mexico).
'Financial infidelity': What defines it, who is at risk, and what are the consequences?
Romantic partners aren't always honest about money in their relationships, but when does hiding purchases, debt and savings constitute 'financial infidelity'?
Deciphering the equations of life
Research led by the University of Arizona has resulted in a set of equations that describes and predicts commonalities across life despite its enormous diversity.
High doses of vitamin D for critically ill patients yield minimal benefit
A major study conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Prevention and Early Treatment of Acute Lung Injury (PETAL) Network into whether high doses of vitamin D can improve health outcomes for critically ill patients has concluded that such supplements do not reduce mortality or improve other non-fatal outcomes.
A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases
In animals, a vaccine modifying the composition and function of the gut microbiota provides protection against the onset of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and certain metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity.
A machine learning approach to identify functional human phosphosites
Scientists have created the largest phosphoproteome resource to date, which is set to help other researchers identify new functionally-relevant phosphosites.
Tree cavities for wild honeybees
The forests in Europe provide habitat for around 80,000 colonies of wild honeybees.
NASA finds Tropical Storm Belna's heavy rainfall potential shrinks
Tropical Storm Belna weakened after it made landfall in northwestern Madagascar, and infrared imagery from NASA showed how the area of strong storms within had diminished.
Single-cell analysis of the earliest cell fate decisions in development
With the construction of a building, one of the first steps before creating the upright structure is to set the foundations and the floorplan.
Understanding Asteraceae: Validation of a Hyb-Seq probe set for evolutionary studies
Researchers evaluated the performance of a Hyb-Seq (hybrid capture with high-throughput sequencing) probe set designed for the large and diverse sunflower family (Asteraceae) and found it effective in reconstructing relationships at multiple taxonomic levels.
Virtual reality and drones help to predict and protect koala habitat
QUT researchers have used a combination of virtual reality (VR), aerial thermal-imaging and ground surveys to build a better statistical model for predicting the location of koalas and, ultimately, protecting their habitat.
Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis
A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.
The songwriter is creative -- the singer, not so much
Country music songwriters must perform a careful dance when they work with famous singers who may be less talented at writing songs but bring the needed star power to attract fans -- and, importantly, to get the song recorded in the first place, research suggests.
Flipping the script on novel cancer therapy leads to insights into lupus
In the last decade, scientists discovered that blocking a key regulator of the immune system helped unleash the body's natural defenses against several forms of cancer, opening up a new era of cancer immunotherapy.
Scrubbing carbon dioxide from smokestacks for cleaner industrial emissions
An international collaboration co-led by an Oregon State University chemistry researcher has uncovered a better way to scrub carbon dioxide from smokestack emissions, which could be a key to mitigating global climate change.
Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form
What could Azteca ants in coffee farms in Mexico have in common with leopards' spots and zebras' stripes?
Researchers develop approach to alter intestinal microbiota, vaccinate against inflammatory diseases
Targeted immunization against bacterial flagellin, a protein that forms the appendage that enables bacterial mobility, can beneficially alter the intestinal microbiota, decreasing the bacteria's ability to cause inflammation and thus protecting against an array of chronic inflammatory diseases, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences and the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University.
The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction.
Financial Infidelity: Secret spending costs couples and companies
Boston College Assistant Professor of Marketing Hristina Nikolova and colleagues define financial infidelity as 'engaging in any financial behavior expected to be disapproved of by one's romantic partner and intentionally failing to disclose the behavior.' Nikolova and researchers from Indiana University, University College London, and University of Notre Dame constructed the first scale to identify and measure the central habits of financial infidelity and examined the effects of this consumer trait on individuals and companies, they report in the Journal of Consumer Research.
Water common -- yet scarce -- in exoplanets
The most extensive survey of atmospheric chemical compositions of exoplanets to date has revealed trends that challenge current theories of planet formation and has implications for the search for water in the solar system and beyond.
Research confirms timing of tropical glacier melt at the end of the last ice age
Findings on ice retreat across the global tropics clarifies how the low latitudes transformed during the end of the last ice age and can help current-day predictions of our own climate future.
Skipping one night of sleep may leave insomniacs twice as impaired, study says
Poor daytime functioning is a frequent complaint among those suffering from insomnia.
Newly described fossil whale represents intermediate stage between foot-powered and tail-powered swimming
A newly described fossil whale represents a new species and an important step in the evolution of whale locomotion, according to a University of Michigan paleontologist and his colleagues.
A window into the hidden world of colons
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a system for real-time observations at the cellular level in the colon of a living mouse.
Researchers analyze artifacts to better understand ancient dietary practices
New research from anthropologists at McMaster University and California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), is shedding light on ancient dietary practices, the evolution of agricultural societies and ultimately, how plants have become an important element of the modern diet.
Examining opioid prescribing after new Florida law
Researchers compared opioid prescribing at discharge from the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., across 25 procedures before and after a Florida law that mandated changes to opioid prescribing went into effect in 2018.
Illumination drives bats out of caves
Researchers of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research and the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology have investigated how the illumination of bat caves affects the animals' behaviour and whether the colour of light makes a difference on their flight.
Teams of microbes are at work in our bodies. Here's how to figure out what they're doing
An algorithm akin to the annoyingly helpful one that attempts to auto-complete text messages and emails is now being harnessed for a better cause.
Unique data confirms why water turns brown
By analysing almost daily water samples taken from the same river from 1940 until today, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have confirmed their hypothesis that the browning of lakes is primarily due to the increase in coniferous forests, as well as rainfall and sulphur deposits.
Mechanisms help pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation
A new study reveals the mechanism that helps pancreatic cancer cells avoid starvation within dense tumors by hijacking a process that pulls nutrients in from their surroundings.
NTU Singapore scientists convert plastics into useful chemicals using sunlight
Chemists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a method that could turn plastic waste into valuable chemicals by using sunlight.
Scientists link decline of baltic cod to hypoxia -- and climate change
If you want to know how climate change and hypoxia -- the related loss of oxygen in the world's oceans -- affect fish species such as the economically important Baltic cod, all you have to do is ask the fish.
APS tip sheet: Dark matter's galactic emissions and game theory of vaccination
The APS Tip Sheet highlights noteworthy research recently published in the Physical Review Journals.
Blood pressure drug could help problem drinkers: QUT research
A drug used to treat high blood pressure may alleviate anxiety induced by long-term heavy alcohol use, and also halt the damage such drinking can cause to the brain's ability to grow new cells, research by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia shows.
Scales offer insight into chronic stress of fish, University of Guelph research finds
Aquatic researchers have long sought an easy way to determine when wild fish are under stress.
Study supports long-term benefits of non-drug therapies for pain
A new study finds that non-drug therapies given to service members with chronic pain may reduce the risk of long-term adverse outcomes, such as alcohol and drug disorder and self-induced injuries, including suicide attempts.
Heat energy leaps through empty space, thanks to quantum weirdness
A surprising new study shows that heat energy can leap across a few hundred nanometers of a complete vacuum, thanks to a quantum mechanical phenomenon called the Casimir interaction.
Promising new approach to treating some of the worst types of leukaemia
'New therapeutic approaches are desperately needed for MLL-r leukaemia,' said Professor Richard Lock, Head of the Blood Cancers Theme at Children's Cancer Institute, Australia.
Bumblebees exposed to Chernobyl-levels of radiation consume more nectar
Researchers at Stirling University have found that exposure to chronic low-dose radiation, found in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, negatively affects bumblebee energy use by increasing their metabolic rate and food consumption.
Eavesdropping on the human microbiome uncovers 'potent' new antibiotics
The microscopic organisms populating the human body have an outsize impact on health and disease, but how these microbes communicate with each other and with human cells is currently largely unknown.
Shrinking of Greenland's glaciers began accelerating in 2000, research finds
Satellite data has given scientists clues about how, when and why Greenland's glaciers are shrinking -- and shows a sharp increase in glacial retreat beginning about 2000, according to new research presented this week.
Groups work better when stakes are gradually increased
A gradual approach to increasing the stakes of group coordination projects can improve overall team performance, according to a new research paper featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Blueprint for nanomaterial development offers hope to newborns, elderly and busy doctors
Scientist hopes 'blueprint' leads to a new golden age of healthcare.
Thunderquakes make underground fiber optic telecommunications cables hum (audio available)
Telecommunications lines designed for carrying internet and phone service can pick up the rumble of thunder underground, potentially providing scientists with a new way of detecting environmental hazards and imaging deep inside the Earth, according to new research being presented today at AGU's Fall Meeting and published in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.
Australian and US team discover new human autoinflammatory disease
Scientists from Australia and the US have discovered and identified the genetic cause of a previously unknown human autoinflammatory disease.
Researchers develop first mathematical proof for key law of turbulence in fluid mechanics
Turbulence is one of the least understood phenomena of the physical world.
OU research group confirm planet-mass objects in extragalactic systems
A University of Oklahoma research group is reporting the detection of extragalactic planet-mass objects in a second and third galaxy beyond the Milky Way after the first detection in 2018.
Boosting the impact of consumer research in the world
The authors urge consumer researchers to break their self-imposed boundaries in order to broaden their impact, lest they become irrelevant to non-academic marketing stakeholders and cede influence to non-marketing academic disciplines.
New insect virus provides a safer platform for flavivirus vaccines and tests
A research team has identified a new species of virus specific to insects that can be engineered to house genes from related viruses that cause diseases such as Zika and yellow fever.
Uncovering how endangered pangolins, or 'scaly anteaters,' digest food
The endangered Sunda pangolin, or 'scaly anteater,' is a widely trafficked mammal, prized in some cultures for its meat and scales.
(Noise-) less is more
Researchers from Osaka University developed a high precision 3D circuit simulator in the time-domain for quantifying EM noise and elucidated its origin, allowing for optimal layout to reduce EM nose.
Up to two-fifths of antibiotic prescriptions in the US could be inappropriate
As much as two fifths (43%) of antibiotic prescriptions in the United States could be inappropriate, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ today.
Importance of breastfeeding in preventing diabetes reaffirmed in rat study
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology shows that breastfeeding is crucial in preventing diabetes.
All age groups worldwide 'at high risk' of drop in children's physical activity
Emphasis on particular groups hinders efforts to address the problem of declining physical activity in children, according to a study led at the University of Strathclyde.
A likely trigger of tropical glacier melt 20,000 years ago
An analysis of sediment carried by glaciers in both South America and East Africa indicates that tropical glaciers not just in South America but across the tropics began to melt earlier than expected at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (26,000-19,000 years ago), before atmospheric carbon dioxide levels began to rise.
New spray gel could help take the bite out of frostbite
Mountaineers and winter sports enthusiasts know the dangers of frostbite -- the tissue damage that can occur when extremities, such as the nose, ears, fingers and toes, are exposed to very cold temperatures.
Refined carbs may trigger insomnia, finds study
Women who consumed a diet high in added sugars and refined carbohydrates had a greater risk of developing insomnia, a new study by researchers at Columbia University has found.
Elderly people should aim to keep up step count this winter
New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at The Physiological Society's early career conference Future Physiology 2019 shows that after just two weeks of reduced physical activity (around 1,500 steps per day), older adults lose significant amounts of muscle which coincides with substantial gains in body fat percentage, especially around the waist.
It's time to explain country in indigenous terms
It's time to write about Indigenous Australian place relationships in a new way -- in a language that speaks in Indigenous terms first, to convey a rich meaning of Country and best identify its deep ecological and social relevance to Aboriginal people.
Why polar bears at sea have higher pollution levels than those staying on land
As the climate changes, myriad animal populations are being impacted.
Cheers! Maxwell's electromagnetism extended to smaller scales
On Dec. 11, 2019, a general framework for incorporating and correcting for nonclassical electromagnetic phenomena in nanoscale systems will be presented in the journal nature.
New insights to major disease pathways
Australian researchers are making major inroads into finding the cause of heart disease, Alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes and other diseases after discovering a further 148 proteins affected by oxidative stress in the human body.
Running research: Heel-toe or toe-heel?
New research from La Trobe University suggests there is no evidence that changing a runner's strike pattern will help prevent injuries or give them a speed boost.

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