Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 19, 2019


Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not
A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites.
Why your first battle with flu matters most
Analyzing public health records from Arizona to study how different strains of the flu virus affect people of different ages, researchers found that the first strain we encounter during childhood sets the course of how our immune system responds to exposures later in life.
Hepatitis D: The mystery of the virus' life cycle revealed
A team led by INRS Professor Patrick Labonté has identified the role of a key process in the replication cycle of the hepatitis D virus, an infection that is still very difficult to cure and affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide.
Comparing future risks associated with gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery
Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that gastric bypass is associated with a higher risk of additional operations or other invasive procedures, compared to a gastric sleeve procedure.
Breakthrough innovation enabling cheaper solar energy production is one step closer to the market
While the need for renewable energy around the world is growing exponentially, Lithuanian and German researchers have come up with a novel solution for developing low-cost solar technology.
How genetics and social games drive evolution of mating systems in mammals
Traditional explanations for why some animals are monogamous and others are promiscuous or polygamous have focused on how the distribution and defensibility of resources (such as food, nest sites, or mates) determine whether, for example, one male can attract and defend multiple females.
Asteroid collisions trigger cascading formation of subfamilies, study concludes
Scientists have always thought about fission clusters as entirely distinct from collisional families.
Science's 2019 breakthrough of the year: The first image of a black hole
Honoring a feat that was once considered impossible, Science has named the Event Horizon Telescope's image of a supermassive black hole as its 2019 Breakthrough of the Year.
Why are alloy metal nanoparticles better than monometallic ones for CNT growth?
Revealing a long-term mystery of why certain nanoparticles are more efficient in incorporating carbon atoms and achieving a faster carbon nanotube growth.
Augmenting attention treatment therapies for difficult-to-treat anxiety in children and adolescents
Between 30 to 50 percent of youth in the United States diagnosed with an anxiety disorder fail to respond to cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT).
Playing the angles with dramatic effect
Researchers report the most complete model to date concerning the transition from metal to insulator in correlated oxides.
Fossil expands ancient fish family tree
A second ancient lungfish has been discovered in Africa, adding another piece to the jigsaw of evolving aquatic life forms more than 400 million years ago.
Type 1 Diabetes: New starting point to delay autoimmune response
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent excessive immune reactions in healthy people.
Many pregnant women with HIV prescribed treatment that does not meet federal guidelines
More than 20% of pregnant women beginning anti-HIV treatment were prescribed an antiretroviral treatment that did not meet federal guidelines for use during pregnancy, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Employers key to addressing lung cancer disparity in rural Kentucky
According to a University of Kentucky study, worksite intervention may be key to connecting men in rural Kentucky with critical lung cancer prevention and control resources and services.
Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women
The more TV we watch the more we prefer thinner female bodies, according to a new comprehensive study on body image.
New classification system for tumors can guide diagnosis and treatment options for cancer
Based on the largest study of cancer patients of its kind, scientists have created a new way of classifying tumours.
New algorithm could mean more efficient, accurate equipment for Army
Researchers working on an Army-funded project have developed an algorithm to simulate how electromagnetic waves interact with materials in devices to create equipment more efficiently and accurately.
NCI-MATCH: Promising signal for nivolumab beyond colorectal cancer
The Journal of Clinical Oncology reports results for Arm Z1D of NCI-MATCH, investigating the activity of nivolumab in tumors with DNA mismatch repair deficiencies.
'Substantially human,' a good starting point for determining boundaries of what's human
Recent and rapid developments in the biosciences continually blur the lines between human beings and other living organisms, while straining the legal definitions of what is or is not human.
Fibroblasts involved in healing spur tumor growth in cancer
The connective tissue cells known as fibroblasts are vitally important for our recovery from injury.
How can healthcare achieve real technology driven transformation?
Real transformation in healthcare through the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, telecommunications, and other advanced technologies could provide significant improvements in healthcare quality, productivity, and access.
Research shows increased sediment flux in the Yangtze river headwater
Sediment flux (SF) in the Tuotuo River on the central Tibetan Plateau (TP), considered the main headwater of the Yangtze River, has significantly increased over the past three decades, according to new research led by scientists from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
Study: yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance
A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months.
New gene for male infertility discovered
Investigators have found that a genetic rearrangement and variants affecting a gene known as SYCP2 are associated with low sperm count and report the first cases implicating the gene in four men with infertility.
Artificial Intelligence can now predict long-term risks of heart attack and cardiac death
A new study in Cardiovascular Research finds that machine learning, the patterns and inferences computers use to learn to perform tasks, can predict the long-term risk of heart attack and cardiac death.
Skin and mucous membrane lesions as complication of pneumonia
Painful inflammatory lesions of the skin and mucous membranes may occur in children who develop bacterial pneumonia.
Scientists discover first antiferromagnetic topological quantum material
A large consortium of international and interdisciplinary research teams involving TU Dresden has discovered a new type of bulk quantum material with intrinsically magnetic and topological properties.
When good plants go bad
Conventional wisdom suggests that only introduced species can be considered invasive and that indigenous plant life cannot be classified as such because they belong within their native range.
Healing rays: Whoopi's quick to mend
'Whoopi' the manta ray -- a regular visitor to Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef -- has helped University of Queensland and Murdoch University scientists study rays' impressive ability to heal.
Wetlands will keep up with sea level rise to offset climate change
Sediment accrual rates in coastal wetlands will outpace sea level rise, enabling wetlands to increase their capacity to sequester carbon, a study from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, shows.
Scientists link common immune cell to failure of checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer
For many lung cancer patients, the best treatment options involve checkpoint inhibitors, but the drugs only help a small subset of patients.
Long work hours at the office linked to both regular and hidden high blood pressure
Office workers who logged 49-plus hours on the job weekly were 70% more likely to have a hidden form of high blood pressure called masked hypertension, compared to people who work less than 35 hours per week.
NASA's Fermi Mission links nearby pulsar's gamma-ray 'halo' to antimatter puzzle
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a faint but sprawling glow of high-energy light around a nearby pulsar.
Adulthood with autism
The independence that comes with growing up can be scary for any teenager, but for young adults with autism spectrum disorder and their caregivers, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can seem particularly daunting.
Mechanical force as a new way of starting chemical reactions
Researchers have shown mechanical force can start chemical reactions, making them cheaper, more broadly applicable, and more environmentally friendly than conventional methods.
AI's future potential hinges on consensus: NAM report
The role of artificial intelligence, or machine learning, will be pivotal as the industry wrestles with a gargantuan amount of data that could improve -- or muddle -- health and cost priorities, according to a National Academy of Medicine Special Publication on the use of AI in health care.
Night eating, lower diet quality during pregnancy associated with greater weight gain & retention
A study led by researchers from KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) has found evidence that pregnant women who consume more of their daily food intake after 7.00pm, and who consume lower quality diets during pregnancy, are more than three times more likely to experience postpartum weight retention of five kilogrammes or more, 18 months after giving birth.
Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar
In a study of rats, University of Illinois scientists found that caffeine limited weight gain and cholesterol production, despite a diet that was high in fat and sugar.
Glutamine may decrease obesity-linked inflammation
Glutamine could help people with obesity reduce inflammation of fat tissue and reduce fat mass, according to a new study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of Oxford in the U.K.
Finding your way in the dark depends on your internal clock
Surprising results show how circadian rhythm changes the way mammals can see.
Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands
The Camargue area in France has considerably fewer grasshopper, cricket, locust, dragonfly, and amphibian species than 40 years ago.
Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release
A new study by the UAB, the CIBER-BBN, and the Hospital de Sant Pau describes the development of a new biomaterial with sustained drug release.
Social bots tweet dodgy claims about pot, diluting solid science
A USC analysis of tens of thousands of cannabis-related posts on Twitter found that social bots regularly perpetuated bogus health claims on the platform, illustrating how false statements may drown out solid science on social media.
Antioxidant use during chemotherapy risky for breast cancer patients
Breast cancer patients who take the dietary supplements known as antioxidants, as well as iron, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids, during chemotherapy may be at increased risk of disease recurrence and death, according to new study results appearing in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
New aqueous lithium-ion battery improves safety without sacrificing performance
As the lithium-ion batteries that power most phones, laptops, and electric vehicles become increasingly fast-charging and high-performing, they also grow increasingly expensive and flammable.
Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees
The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management.
Watermelon supplements bring health benefits to obese mice
Eating watermelon in the form of powdered supplements helped adult obese mice avoid some detrimental health effects of an unhealthy diet, according to a new Oregon State University study.
A surprising new source of attention in the brain
Scientists find a new brain area in control of our attention skills, raising new questions in what has long been considered a settled scientific field.
Improving efficiency, effectiveness of security X-ray technology
The smuggling of contraband is a threat in airport security and risks have increased in modern times with the uptick in parcel delivery, but security inspection methods have not seen any significant improvements.
Scientists find iron 'snow' in Earth's core
The Earth's inner core is hot, under immense pressure and snow-capped, according to new research that could help scientists better understand forces that affect the entire planet.
Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time
In a finding that could be useful in designing small aquatic robots, researchers have measured the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid -- a phenomenon known as the 'Cheerios effect.'
Number of people in need of renal replacement therapy is rising
The 2017 Annual Report of the ERA-EDTA Registry [1] reveals that only a small fraction of patients accepted for renal replacement therapy are able to start this treatment with the best available therapy, which is transplantation, -- and that the number of people who are in need of renal replacement therapy is rising.
Your DNA is not your destiny -- or a good predictor of your health
In most cases, your genes have less than five per cent to do with your risk of developing a particular disease, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.
Model beats Wall Street analysts in forecasting business financials
In a paper published this week in the Proceedings of ACM Sigmetrics Conference, MIT researchers describe a model for forecasting financials that uses only anonymized weekly credit card transactions and three-month earning reports.
Conservation's hidden costs take bite out of benefits
Scientists show that even popular conservation programs can harbor hidden costs, often for vulnerable populations.
New liquid metal wearable pressure sensor created for health monitoring applications
A KAIST research team developed a highly sensitive wearable pressure sensor for health monitoring applications.
Acid reflux affects nearly a third of US adults weekly
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive disorder that causes hearburn and other uncomfortable symptoms, may affect nearly a third of US adults each week, and most of those who take certain popular medications for it still have symptoms, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.
Advanced imaging tips T cell target recognition on its head
T cells represent a key component of our immune system, and play a critical role in protecting us against harmful pathogens like viruses and bacteria, and cancers.
MAGIC system allows researchers to modulate the activity of genes acting in concert
Genomic research has unlocked the capability to edit the genomes of living cells; yet so far, the effects of such changes must be examined in isolation.
Research finds positive community action can help coral reef health
A team of social scientists and ecologists have worked with two communities in Papua New Guinea to document and investigate their enduring success in managing their reefs sustainably.
Forecast to help shellfish growers weather toxicity
The same technology that powers facial recognition and self-driving cars may soon help Maine's shellfish industry protect people from the dangerous effects of harmful algal blooms.
Mining metagenomics: A faster and more efficient method to compare metagenomes
A research team from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology reported a comprehensive comparison method for microbiomes.
New research shows domestic animals link virus spread among humans and wildlife
New research carried out at Swansea University has highlighted the role domesticated animals -- both pets and livestock -- play in the spread of viruses among humans and wildlife. according to new research involving Swansea University.
A 'Jackalope' of an ancient spider fossil deemed a hoax, unmasked as a crayfish
A team from the University of Kansas used fluorescence microscopy to analyze the supposed spider and differentiate what parts of the specimen were fossilized organism, and which parts were potentially doctored.
Form of severe malnutrition linked to DNA modification
Researchers identified significant differences at the epigenetic level -- the chemical tags in DNA that help regulate gene expression -- between two clinically distinct forms of acute childhood malnutrition known as edematous severe acute malnutrition (ESAM) and non-edematous SAM (NESAM).
Modern trees emerged earlier than previously believed, new research reveals
A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has uncovered evidence that the transition toward forests as we know them today began earlier than typically believed. 
Penn researchers predict 10-year breast cancer recurrence with MRI scans
According to a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and radiomics could help to characterize the heterogeneity of cancer cells within a tumor and allow for a better understanding of the causes and progression of a person's individual disease.
The majority consider themselves more environmentally friendly than others
Research from the University of Gothenburg shows that we tend to overestimate our personal environmental engagement.
The meaning of emotion: Cultural and biological evolution impact how humans feel feelings
Words for emotions like 'anger' and 'fear' vary in meaning across language families.
Words to express emotion vary greatly in their meanings across languages
Almost all humans feel the emotion of love, but does that mean the Turkish word sevgi or the Hungarian word szrelem, which both translate to love in English, convey the same feeling?
NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
An experimental Zika vaccine lowered levels of virus in pregnant monkeys and improved fetal outcomes in a rhesus macaque model of congenital Zika virus infection, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine.
Advancing information processing with exceptional points and surfaces
Researchers have for the first time detected an exceptional surface based on measurements of exceptional points.
When it's story time, animated books are better for learning
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that digital storybooks that animate upon a child's vocalization offer beneficial learning opportunities, especially for children with less developed attention regulation.
Dangerous bone marrow, organ transplant complication explained
Scientists have discovered the molecular mechanism behind how the common cytomegalovirus can wreak havoc on bone marrow and organ transplant patients, according to a paper published in the journal Cell & Host Microbe.
Trust and social support important to heart health among Canadian First Nations: Study
The study involved 1,300 men and women who answered lifestyle questionnaires and had physical measures, blood samples and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) completed.
Study busts 9 to 5 model for academic work
An observational study of academic working hours has identified large differences in how researchers around the world manage their work-life balance.
Evolution tunes birds to fit the bill
Using behavioral observations, morphological measurements, and mathematical analyses, researchers in the Biodiversity and Biocomplexity Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in a collaborative project with a lab in the Czech Republic, have found that beak shape is a compromise between its many functions -- a valuable insight into the nuanced processes driving evolution.
Bilingual children are strong, creative storytellers, study shows
Bilingual children use as many words as monolingual children when telling a story, and demonstrate high levels of cognitive flexibility, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.
Pollution league tables for UK urban areas reveal the expected and unexpected
The Bedfordshire town of Luton has come bottom of a league table of predicted city-wide air pollution concentrations among UK cities, according to new analysis by the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster.
Scientists discover medicinal cannabis substitute for treating Parkinson's disease
A drug that provides the benefits obtained from medicinal cannabis without the 'high' or other side effects may help to unlock a new treatment for Parkinson's disease.
'Inconsistent and misleading' password meters could increase risk of cyber attacks
With the worst passwords of 2019 now revealed, and technology topping many festive wish lists, a new study by the University of Plymouth assessed the effectiveness of password meters that people are likely to use or encounter on a regular basis.
On-chip light source produces versatile range of wavelengths
Researchers have designed a new chip-integrated light source that can transform infrared wavelengths into visible wavelengths, which have been difficult to produce with technology based on silicon chips.
Mowing urban lawns less intensely increases biodiversity, saves money and reduces pests
Researchers from the University of Quebec at Trois-Rivieres have found that reducing the intensity of lawn mowing in urban spaces leads to increased biodiversity, economic savings and reduced presence of allergy-triggering weeds.
New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England -- the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.
Understanding why songbirds choose their homes
New research by University of Alberta biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest -- and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns.
Fireballs: mail from space
The analysis of fireball observations in large datasets can be made much quicker with the help of a neat mathematical formula, the α-β criterion.
A new role for a triple-negative breast cancer target
A team led by Rumela Chakrabarti of the University of Pennsylvania has made new discoveries into how a key protein involved in triple-negative breast cancer functions in puberty.
Impact of methamphetamine use depends on your genes
The research, published in Molecular Psychiatry found that variations in the gene known as BDNF strongly determine the effects of methamphetamine in the brain.
Towards new lithium-ion batteries that are safer and more efficient
Researchers have studied 2 types of cathodes that are very similar in their composition, but which show completely different behavior: one of them suffers from the known loss of energy density in the first charge cycle, while the other does not.
Discovered the first intrinsic magnetic topological insulator
The results of this study are being published this week in the prestigious journal Nature, and have great potential both at fundamental level and for future technological applications.
Guidelines for clinicians to address youth vaping
Physicians from Boston Medical Center and the University of Montreal have developed a set of recommendations that provide important insights about how clinicians can best screen, counsel and treat youth for vaping.
Reducing mouse allergens may improve lung growth in asthmatic children
Lowering exposure to allergens from mice may lead to improved lung growth for children with asthma living in low-income neighborhoods, helping them avoid lung ailments and possibly live longer, according to newly published research in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
Bochum team wins second place in machine-learning competition
With their algorithm for material-property prediction, Dr. Yury Lysogorskiy and Dr.
Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought
The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows.
How microbes reflect the health of coral reefs
Microorganisms play important roles in the health and protection of coral reefs, yet exploring these connections can be difficult due to the lack of unspoiled reef systems throughout the global ocean.
A discovery helps the development of a topological quantum computer and dark matter detector
The MnBi2Te4 single crystal synthesised by the researchers can be used in developing superfast memory cells, spintronics devices, quantum computers, and even a dark matter detector.
Study finds less-aggressive chemotherapy after initial treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer to be more beneficial
A Mayo Clinic study involving 5,540 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer finds that maintenance chemotherapy after initial treatment is more beneficial for patients whose disease is under control, compared with more aggressive treatment.
Addressing committed emissions in both US and China requires carbon capture and storage
While the energy systems of the two highest-emitting countries differ, each needs to develop CCS to address their committed emissions, which threaten global climate targets.
Host sensor AhR commits quorum sensing espionage to fight infection
Through molecular espionage, a particular receptor (known as AhR) allows its host's immune response to stay one step ahead of infection; it achieves this by listening in on the inter-cellular transmissions that bacterial pathogens use to collectively coordinate an invasion.
An atomic view of the trigger for the heartbeat
Tiny pores in heart cells generate electrical signals to initiate each heart beat.
Scientists uncover world's oldest forest
Scientists have discovered remnants of the world's oldest fossil forest in a sandstone quarry in Cairo, N.Y.
New therapeutic strategy for chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
A Wistar study demonstrated that NAMPT, an enzyme critical for NAD+ biosynthesis, mediates selection of stem-like chemoresistant cells following cisplatin treatment.
Emotion concepts are not the same worldwide
Fear, anger, sadness -- while it is often assumed these emotion concepts are the same the world over, new research suggests there is greater cross-cultural variation in 'how people think about emotions than is widely assumed', contributor Dr.
Astronomers reveal new image of candy cane-shaped feature in the center of our galaxy
A team of astronomers has produced a new image of an 'candy cane'-like object in the center of our Milky Way galaxy.
Marine biology: Acidified oceans may corrode shark scales
Prolonged exposure to high carbon dioxide (acidified) seawater may corrode tooth-like scales (denticles) covering the skin of puffadder shysharks, a study in Scientific Reports suggests.
Researchers identify potential formula for blood cancer vaccine
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a way to move precision immunotherapy forward by using genomics to inform immunotherapy for multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in December.
Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation
While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)'s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.
Is there a link between lifetime lead exposure and dementia?
A new hypothesis by University of Toronto Professor Esme Fuller-Thomson, recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, suggests that the declining dementia rates may be a result of generational differences in lifetime exposure to lead.
Light pollution can suppress melatonin production in humans and animals
Melatonin sets the internal clock. Researchers from Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) in an international team have analyzed data on the impact of light pollution on melatonin formation in humans and vertebrates.
ESO observations reveal black holes' breakfast at the cosmic dawn
Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have observed reservoirs of cool gas around some of the earliest galaxies in the universe.
Only 1 in 10 suicide prevention apps cover full guidelines, NTU Singapore study finds
Most (93%) mobile apps for suicide prevention and depression management do not provide all the six suicide prevention strategies that are commonly recommended in international clinical guidelines, a study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.
Extending Medicare Part D rebates to beneficiaries would save seniors $29 billion over 7 years
A new assessment of the Medicare Part D program based on a proposal from the West Health Policy Center finds that Medicare beneficiaries would save $29 billion if drug manufacturer rebates were used to reduce their out-of-pocket costs at the pharmacy counter through the Part D benefit -- as long as these rebate savings are not also used to reduce Part D manufacturer liability.
Following scientific literature review, Imperial Brands calls for legalisation of snus in EU
Following a new literature review of the harm reduction potential of snus, Imperial Brands -- owners of leading snus brand Skruf -- has urged the European Union (EU) to re-examine its position on the product.
New 'tooth-on-a-chip' could lead to more personalized dentistry
A so-called ''tooth-on-a-chip'' could one day enable more personalized dentistry, giving dentists the ability to identify dental filling materials that work better and last longer based on a patient's own teeth and oral microbiome.
Fossil soils reveal emergence of modern forest ecology earlier than previously thought
While sifting through fossil soils in the Catskill region near Cairo, New York, researchers uncovered the extensive root system of 385-million-year-old trees that already appeared to have leaves and wood.
Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon.
Army releases top 10 list of coolest science, technology advances
This year has had its share of science and technology advances from Army researchers.
Affordable Care Act led to improved treatment of colorectal cancer among young adults
An Affordable Care Act provision that allowed young adults to be covered under their parents' insurance led to a shift to earlier-stage diagnosis and more timely receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy among young colorectal cancer patients, according to a new American Cancer Society study.
Which is more effective for treating PTSD: Medication, or psychotherapy?
A systematic review and meta-analysis led by Jeffrey Sonis, MD, MPH, of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, finds there is insufficient evidence at present to answer that question.
The Internet of Things by satellite will become increasingly accessible
Thanks to the implementation of advanced random access schemes using efficient, low complexity algorithms.
No storm in a teacup -- it's a cyclone on a silicon chip
University of Queensland researchers have combined quantum liquids and silicon-chip technology to study turbulence for the first time, opening the door to new navigation technologies and improved understanding of the turbulent dynamics of cyclones and other extreme weather.
Bacteria spread by ticks affected by humidity and mutual competition
No specific environment or temperature favourable to all of the most common pathogens borne by ticks was found in an international study, since different bacterial species thrive in different conditions.
Evaluating clinical evidence of acupuncture, acupressure for improving cancer pain?
This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined results from 14 randomized clinical trials to evaluate evidence of an association between acupuncture and acupressure for reducing pain in patients with cancer.
Structures in seaweed shed light on sustainability
By examining the enzymes that break down the alginate, the researchers from China and the United Kingdom may be able to harness the natural process to produce biofuel.
Honey, I shrunk Michelangelo's David
Researchers in Zurich have reproduced Michelangelo's David as a miniature in metal.
Top ESC stories in the news in 2019
Environmental and lifestyle issues were popular this year, with pick up from both ESC journals and congresses.
SUTD and collaborators developed novel methodology to predict spinal fractures in patients
SUTD-led research enables more accurate patient-specific analysis of spinal fractures in a non-invasive manner, providing timely opportunities for early treatment.
Tweaks behind the rebirth of nearly discarded organic solar technologies
A minuscule chemical tweak is advancing an organic solar technology that was once thought unviable.
New study identifies last known occurrence of Homo erectus
Scientists have identified the last known occurrence of Homo erectus--in Central Java, Indonesia between 117,000 and 108,000 years ago.
Research validates new control tactic for herbicide-resistant weeds in US soybean crops
In a recent study featured in the journal Weed Science, a team of researchers explored whether impact mills could help US growers fight Palmer amaranth and other herbicide-resistant weeds in soybean crops.
New algorithm suggests four-level food web for gut microbes
A new computational model suggests that the food web of the human gut microbiome follows a hierarchical structure similar to that of larger-scale ecosystems.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: IRL Online
Original broadcast date: March 20, 2020. Our online lives are now entirely interwoven with our real lives. But the laws that govern real life don't apply online. This hour, TED speakers explore rules to navigate this vast virtual space.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Falling
There are so many ways to fall–in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls.  We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.