Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 23, 2019


Innovative method delivers new insights into the stem cell microenvironment
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, have developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organisation of bone marrow at a single cell level.
For restricted eaters, a place at the table but not the meal
People with restricted diets -- due to allergies, health issues or religious or cultural norms -- are more likely to feel lonely when they can't share in what others are eating, new Cornell University research shows.
A fast and inexpensive device to capture and identify viruses
A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University.
Study reveals a role for jumping genes during times of stress
Study reveals a role for jumping genes during times of stress.
Barring nonmedical exemptions increases vaccination rates, study finds
The first rigorously controlled study of a 2016 California law that aimed to increase childhood vaccination rates by eliminating nonmedical exemptions has found the law worked as intended, although the researchers noted a small increase in the number of medical exemptions.
Gone fishin' -- for proteins
Casting lines into human cells to snag proteins, a team of Montreal researchers has solved a 20-year-old mystery of cell biology.
Could higher magnesium intake reduce fatal coronary heart disease risk in women?
A new prospective study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative found a potential inverse association between dietary magnesium and fatal coronary heart disease in postmenopausal women.
Science snapshots
This edition of Science Snapshots highlights an investigational cancer drug that targets tumors caused by mutations in the KRAS gene, a new library of artificial proteins that could accelerate the design of new materials, and the natural toughening mechanism behind adult tooth enamel.
3D atlas of the bone marrow -- in single cell resolution
Stem cells located in the bone marrow generate and control the production of blood and immune cells.
New polymer material may help batteries become self-healing, recyclable
Lithium-ion batteries are notorious for developing internal electrical shorts that can ignite a battery's liquid electrolytes, leading to explosions and fires.
Climate change not the only threat to vulnerable species, habitat matters
Though climate change is becoming one of the greatest threats to the Earth's already stressed ecosystems, it may not be the most severe threat today for all species, say authors of a new report on the effects of deforestation on two lemur species in Madagascar.
New nano-barrier for composites could strengthen spacecraft payloads
The University of Surrey has developed a robust multi-layed nano-barrier for ultra-lightweight and stable carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) that could be used to build high precision instrument structures for future space missions.
Untangling links between nitrogen oxides and airborne sulfates helps tackle hazy air pollution
A research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) unveiled a first-in-kind study of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and its role in the rise and fall of airborne sulfates in hazy air pollution, offering policymakers new insights into ways to tackle smoggy weather.
Delivery of healthy donor cells key to correcting bone disorder, UConn researchers find
n the journal STEM CELLS, research group of Dr. Ivo Kalajzic, lead investigator and professor, presents a study with potential for new treatments to address the root cause of weak and brittle bones.
How to tell if a brain is awake
A Michigan Medicine team was able to demonstrate, using rats, that the EEG doesn't always track with being awake.
Powder, not gas: A safer, more effective way to create a star on Earth
PPPL scientists have found that sprinkling a type of powder into fusion plasma could aid in harnessing the ultra-hot gas within a tokamak facility to produce heat to create electricity without producing greenhouse gases or long-term radioactive waste.
The link between drawing and seeing in the brain
Drawing an object and naming it engages the brain in similar ways, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.
Chimpanzees more likely to share tools, teach skills when task is complex
A new study finds that chimpanzees that use a multi-step process and complex tools to gather termites are more likely to share tools with novices.
Nanoparticle therapeutic restores tumor suppressor, sensitizes cancer cells to treatment
Leveraging advancements in nanotechnology, investigators from the Brigham have found that restoring p53 not only delays the growth of p53-deficient liver and lung cancer cells but may also make tumors more vulnerable to cancer drugs known as mTOR inhibitors.
Scientists learn what women know -- and don't know -- about breast density and cancer risk
A new study by scientists at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice conducted focus groups with women in three different states to learn what they did and did not know about breast density, in general and their own.
Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £400 million per year
Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK.
A new method for boosting the learning of mathematics
How can mathematics learning in primary school be facilitated? UNIGE has developed an intervention to promote the learning of math in school.
Parents: Turkey makes great leftovers -- opioids do not
Leftover prescription opioids pose big risks to kids, yet most parents keep their own and their child's unused painkillers even after they're no longer medically necessary for pain.
Benefits of electrification don't accrue equally for women, finds survey of homes in India
As households gain access to electricity, gender inequality persists in how energy is used.
Plant-rich diet protects mice against foodborne infection, UTSW researchers find
Mice fed a plant-rich diet are less susceptible to gastrointestinal (GI) infection from a pathogen such as the one currently under investigation for a widespread E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce, UT Southwestern researchers report.
Can brain injury from boxing, MMA be measured?
For boxers and mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters, is there a safe level of exposure to head trauma?
High fat diet impairs new neuron creation in female mice
A high fat diet limits the birth and growth of new neurons in adult female, but not male, mice, according to new research published in eNeuro.
Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication.
The birds and the bees and the bearded dragons
Though sex itself is widespread among lifeforms, the mechanisms determining an individual's sex vary spectacularly across organisms.
Study finds connection between cardiac blood test before surgery and adverse outcomes
The VISION study looked at whether levels of a cardiac blood test, NT-proBNP, measured before surgery can predict cardiac and vascular complications.
Moms' obesity in pregnancy is linked to lag in sons' development and IQ
A mother's obesity in pregnancy can affect her child's development years down the road, according to researchers who found lagging motor skills in preschoolers and lower IQ in middle childhood for boys whose mothers were severely overweight while pregnant.
SFU research points to unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels
A new study led by Simon Fraser University's Dean of Science, Professor Paul Kench, has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean.
California's stricter vaccine exemption policy and improved vaccination rates
California's elimination, in 2016, of non-medical vaccine exemptions from school entry requirements was associated with an estimated increase in vaccination coverage at state and county levels, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Nathan Lo of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.
Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties
Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists.
For CRISPR, tweaking DNA fragments before inserting yields highest efficiency rates yet
University of Illinois researchers achieved the highest reported rates of inserting genes into human cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system, a necessary step for harnessing CRISPR for clinical gene-therapy applications.
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer
A recent study showed that being overweight or obese was a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer, but it did not take into account related cardiac risk factors or other classic risk factors of cardiotoxicity produced by anthracycline and trastuzumab.
Injection of virus-delivered gene silencer blocks ALS degeneration, saves motor function
Novel spinal therapy/delivery approach prevented disease onset in neurodegenerative ALS disease model in adult mice and blocked progression in animals already showing disease symptoms.
Calcium channels play a key role in the development of diabetes
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have deciphered the diabetogenic role of a certain type of calcium channel in insulin-secreting beta cells.
People think marketing and political campaigns use psychology to influence their behaviors
A new study has shown that whilst people think advertising and political campaigns exploit psychological research to control their unconscious behaviors, ultimately they feel the choices they make are still their own.
'Tweezer clock' may help tell time more precisely
A new optical atomic clock makes ultra-precise time measurements.
Cultural evolution caused broad-scale historical declines of large mammals across China
Researchers from Aarhus University and Nanjing University have shown that cultural evolution overshadowed climate change in driving historical broad-scale megafauna dynamics across China.
New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light
Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.
Looking at the good vibes of molecules
Label-free dynamic detection of biomolecules is a major challenge in live-cell microscopy.
Socioeconomic inequalities are decisive in the health of the elderly
Researchers at the UPV/EHU, Osakidetza and the Department of Health have reviewed scientific papers that analyse the relationship between socioeconomic inequalities and health among the elderly population in Spain.
'Lost crops' could have fed as many as maize
Grown together, newly examined 'lost crops' could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as traditionally grown maize, according to new research from Washington University in St.
Fossil research unveils new turtle species and hints at intercontinental migrations
A multi-institution research team working with fossils archived at the Arlington Archosaur Site (AAS) of Texas has described four extinct turtle species, including a new river turtle named after AAS paleontologist Dr.
Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done
Immunologists from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have revealed two independent mechanisms driving self-defense molecules to trigger cell death.
Resurrected protein reveals structure of important enzyme
To disarm toxic substances, many organisms -- including humans -- possess enzymes called flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs).
EMBL co-develops new method that could facilitate cancer diagnosis
Researchers led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have developed a cheaper and faster method to check for genetic differences in individual cells, which outperforms existing techniques with respect to the information received.
The coolest LEGO ® in the universe
For the first time, LEGO ® has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy -- the development of quantum computing.
New treatment Strategy may thwart deadly brain tumors
New research reveals a promising strategy that makes glioblastoma susceptible to immune checkpoint inhibitors.
Stanford study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish
Researchers combined field studies, lab experiments and modeling to figure out how whales manage to capture fish.
High-performance anode for all-solid-state Li batteries is made of Si nanoparticles
A new study led by NIMS researchers reveals that, in solid electrolytes, a Si anode composed only of commercial Si nanoparticles prepared by spray deposition -- the method is a cost-effective, atmospheric technique - exhibits excellent electrode performance, which has previously been observed only for film electrodes prepared by evaporation processes.
Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers
A team of Florida researchers and their collaborators created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their 'lost years.'
Buckyballs release electron-positron pairs in forward directions
New research published in EPJ D reveals the characteristics of positronium formation within football-shaped nanoparticles, C60, for the first time.
NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Phanfone's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Phanfone.
How cells relieve DNA replication stress
IBS scientists revealed that ATAD5 actively deals with replication stress, in addition to its known function to prevent such stressful situations.
Massive gas disk raises questions about planet formation theory
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a young star surrounded by an astonishing mass of gas.
Measuring mutations in sperm may reveal risk for autism in future children
Spontaneous mutations in male sperm are linked to development of autism spectrum disorder.
Researchers to develop a theory of transients in graphene
Research group develops a theory that describes the behavior of graphene in the moment of it's transition from the state of thermal equilibrium and the process of returning to this state.
Home for the holidays -- But will grandpa remember me?
Home for the Holidays - But Will Grandpa Remember Me?
Electronics at the speed of light
A European team of researchers including physicists from the University of Konstanz has found a way of transporting electrons at times below the femtosecond range by manipulating them with light.
2D materials: arrangement of atoms measured in silicene
Silicene consists of a single layer of silicon atoms. In contrast to the ultra-flat material graphene, which is made of carbon, silicene shows surface irregularities that influence its electronic properties.
A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space
Genetic editing is moving tomato crops from the field to the city skyline, or even outer space.
Computing with molecules: A big step in molecular spintronics
Chemists and physicists at Kiel University joined forces with colleagues from France, and Switzerland to design, deposit and operate single molecular spin switches on surfaces.
Researchers identify immune-suppressing target in glioblastoma
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a tenacious subset of immune macrophages that thwart treatment of glioblastoma with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade, elevating a new potential target for treating the almost uniformly lethal brain tumor.
Development of a stretchable vibration-powered device using a liquid electret
NIMS and AIST developed a liquid electret material capable of semi-permanently retaining static electricity.
Capturing CO2 from trucks and reducing their emissions by 90%
Researchers at EPFL have patented a new concept that could cut trucks' CO2 emissions by almost 90%.
Scientists develop gentle, microscopic hands to study tiny, soft materials
Handling very soft, delicate items without damaging them is hard enough with human hands, let alone doing it at the microscopic scale with laboratory instruments.
OU geoscientists document 300 million year old atmospheric dust
Dust plays a crucial role in the life and health of our planet.
Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance
A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.