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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 01, 2020


Bone analysis suggests small T. rexes were not a separate genus; they were kids
Settling a decades-long debate about whether small Tyrannosaurus rex specimens represent a separate genus or rather just ''kids'' of their kind, a new examination of thinly sliced bones from two specimens at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Illinois suggests the latter.
Spectroscopy: A fine sense for molecules
Scientists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics have developed a unique laser technology for the analysis of the molecular composition of biological samples.
Changed route of immunization dramatically improves efficacy of TB vaccine
Tuberculosis (TB), an ancient disease, is the leading infectious cause of death globally, yet the world's only licensed TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), was developed a century ago.
Switching tracks: Reversing electrons' course through nature's solar cells
New research from Washington University in St. Louis and Argonne National Laboratory coaxes electrons down the track that they typically don't travel -- advancing understanding of the earliest light-driven events of photosynthesis.
Researchers learn more about teen-age T.Rex
A team led by Holly Woodward Ballard, Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, studied two mid-sized tyrannosaur skeletons and concluded they were in fact teenage T.Rex and not a new pygmy species.
Alzheimer 'tau' protein far surpasses amyloid in predicting toll on brain tissue
The results, published Jan. 1, 2020 in Science Translational Medicine, support researchers' growing recognition that tau drives brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease more directly than amyloid protein, and at the same time demonstrates the potential of recently developed tau-based PET (positron emission tomography) brain imaging technology to accelerate Alzheimer's clinical trials and improve individualized patient care.
Heart attack discovery could give hope to people not able to be treated
As a result of myocardial infarction (heart attack), scar tissue forms that negatively affects heart function.
All global sustainability is local
Groundbreaking ways to quantify progress towards sustainable development goals find sustainability, like politics, is local.
Pro-lifers exploiting civil rights struggles in bid to ban abortions, says new research
New research launches as state legislatures begin reconvening where bans are likely to be introduced.
Delivering TB vaccine intravenously dramatically improves potency, study shows
Worldwide, more people die from tuberculosis than any other infectious disease, even though the vast majority were vaccinated.
New study estimates the global extent of river ice loss as Earth warms
A new study from researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Geological Sciences found that annual river ice cover will decline by about six days for every one degree Celsius increase in global temperatures.
Tumor DNA platform scopes out and classifies colorectal cancer
A new machine learning platform can identify patients with colorectal cancer and helps predict their disease severity and survival, according to a study involving samples from thousands of subjects.

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