Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 07, 2020


New compounds block master regulator of cancer growth, metastasis
Scientists have developed new drug compounds that thwart the pro-cancer activity of FOXM1, a transcription factor that regulates the activity of dozens of genes.
SDSU astronomers pinpoint two new 'Tatooine' planetary systems
The discoveries include the first circumbinary planet revealed by observations from NASA's TESS mission, which will search nearly the entire sky.
Brain tumour research could help future precision medicine
New research on brain tumours could improve patient diagnosis and treatment options as part of a precision medicine approach.
Cosmic bubbles reveal the first stars
Astronomers using the Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a program of NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, have identified several overlapping bubbles of hydrogen gas ionized by the stars in early galaxies, a mere 680 million years after the Big Bang.
Kangaroo Island shows burn scars on one third of the land mass
NASA's Terra satellite provided before and after imagery that showed the extent of the fires that have been ravaging Australia's Kangaroo Island.
Utilizing relativistic effects for laser fusion: A new approach for clean power
Researchers at Osaka University studied a new approach for laser nuclear fusion utilizing relativistic phenomena of intense laser light.
Million Veteran Program study sheds light on genetic basis of anxiety
In the largest genetic study on anxiety to date, VA researchers found new evidence on the underlying biological causes of the disorder.
Evolution on the vine: A history of tomato domestication in Latin America
A new study funded by the US National Science Foundation, published in the Advance Access edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, has revealed and confirmed the history of tomatoes from South America, from once blueberry-sized to the large fruits of today.
Sweet success -- sugar levels drop in UK yogurts
A survey of yogurt ingredients show that sugar levels have significantly decreased in the last two years, but concerns about overall nutritional content remain.
The birds and the bats: Evolving to fly may have had big effect on gut microbiome
UC San Diego researchers studied nearly 900 vertebrate species and found that bats have unusual gut microbiomes that more closely resemble those of birds than other mammals, raising questions about how evolutionary pressures change the gut microbiome.
Take heart: Pitt study reveals how relaxin targets cardiovascular disease
As a healthy heart ages, it becomes more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases.
Intervention for patients hospitalized with HIV improved reengagement and outcomes of care
Providing multidisciplinary team consults for HIV patients while they are hospitalized to help address social and medical barriers reduces future infection rates and boosts participation in follow-up care, results from a study on how to reengage patients show.
New map of Milky Way reveals giant wave of stellar nurseries
Harvard scientists have observed a massive, wave-shaped gaseous structure made up of stellar nurseries, forming one of the largest coherent structures ever observed in our Galaxy.
Does timing matter for initiating HIV therapy in infants?
Results of a trial in newborns with HIV who started antiretroviral therapy within 14 days of birth showed that about 75 percent attained viral suppression on ART; but only 52 percent sustained suppression on ART.
US$1 dollar increase in minimum wage linked to 3.5-6% fall in suicide rate
A US$1 increase in the minimum wage is linked to a fall in the suicide rate of between 3.5 and 6% among people with high school education or less, reveals a 26-year study, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
Air pollution in childhood linked to schizophrenia
Children who grow up in areas with heavy air pollution have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia.
Children frequently receive unnecessary medical care regardless of insurance type
Children with public insurance are slightly more likely to receive medical services that they don't need than those with private insurance, a new study finds.
NASA's TESS mission uncovers its 1st world with two stars
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has found its first circumbinary planet, a world orbiting two stars.
Research team traces evolution of the domesticated tomato
In a new paper, a team of evolutionary biologists and geneticists led by senior author associate professor Ana Caicedo, with first author Hamid Razifard at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and others, report that they have identified missing links in the tomato's evolution from a wild blueberry-sized fruit in South America to the larger modern tomato of today.
Virtual reality, real injuries: OSU study shows how to reduce physical risk in VR
Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches -- these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use.
Many in LA jails could be diverted into mental health treatment
The largest mental health facilities in the US are now county jails, with an estimated 15% of men and 31% of women who are incarcerated in jails nationally having a serious and persistent mental disorder.
Indeterminist physics for an open world
Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world.
Researchers develop universal flu vaccine that protects against 6 influenza viruses in mice
A novel nanoparticle vaccine that combines two major influenza proteins is effective in providing broad, long-lasting protection against influenza virus in mice, showing promise as a universal flu vaccine, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
Young adults using both e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes at significantly higher risk of stroke
People are looking at e-cigarettes as a 'healthy' alternative to cigarettes and we currently have an epidemic of e-cigarettes use.
Affordable Care Act led to fewer disruptions in care
Among low-income adults enrolled in Medicaid, disruptions in coverage, or churning, decreased following the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
Drowning death rates 3 to 4 times lower in US states that regulate open water swim sites
Rates of drowning deaths in US states that more comprehensively regulate open water swim sites are three to four times lower than in states without any such policies, reveals research published online in the journal Injury Prevention.
Binary star V Sagittae will explode as a very bright 'nova' by century's end
The faint star V Sagittae, V Sge, in the constellation Sagitta, is barely visible, even in mid-sized telescopes.
An artificial neural connection allows a new cortical site to control hand movements
Restoration of lost motor function after stroke is typically accomplished after strenuous rehabilitation therapy lasting for over months.
Significant underreporting in safety data found on Nursing Home Compare website
The website Nursing Home Compare, is a go-to resource for many families researching nursing home options for their loved ones, however, a University of Chicago researcher has found that the data used by Nursing Home Compare to report patient safety related to falls may be highly inaccurate.
Researchers develop predictive tools to tackle childhood diarrheal disease outbreaks in Botswana
Virginia Tech professor Kathleen Alexander and her research team discovered a critical link between environmental dynamics and human health.
Nosebleed (epistaxis): New clinical practice guideline
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Nosebleed (Epistaxis) today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.
The Milky Way's impending galactic collision is already birthing new stars
The Milky Way's outskirts are home to its oldest stars.
Federal data undercounts fatal overdose deaths caused by specific drugs
The number of drug overdose deaths is severely undercounted by the federal government.
'Census' in the zebrafish's brain
Dresden scientists have succeeded in determining the number and type of newly formed neurons in zebrafish; practically conducting a 'census' in their brains.
Study of veterans details genetic basis for anxiety, links anxiety and depression
A massive genomewide analysis of approximately 200,000 military veterans has identified six genetic variants linked to anxiety, researchers from Yale and colleagues at other institutions report Jan.
NCI-MATCH: T-DM1 shows promising activity in salivary gland cancer
A discovery from NCI-MATCH, the largest precision medicine cancer trial, relates to patients with salivary gland cancer treated with ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), a drug already FDA-approved for certain types of breast cancer.
Scientists make breakthrough in ion-conducting composite membranes
Chinese researchers under the direction of Professors LI Xianfeng and ZHANG Huamin from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed an ultrathin ion-conducting membrane with high selectivity and conductivity that can boost the power of flow batteries.
Pooled data used to examine powder use by women in genital area, ovarian cancer risk
Researchers pooled data from four large study groups with 250,000 women to estimate the association between using body powder in the genital area and risk of ovarian cancer.
New recommendations released on bedsharing to promote breastfeeding
Leading experts representing The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) have released new evidence-based recommendations regarding the benefits and risks of bedsharing for mother-infant pairs who have initiated breastfeeding and are in home settings.
Single dose of antibodies can knock out HIV in newborns
A single dose of an antibody-based treatment can prevent HIV transmission from mother to baby, new nonhuman primate research suggests for the first time.
Trial examines effect of folic acid, zinc supplementation in male partners of couples seeking infertility treatment
This randomized clinical trial examined the effects of daily folic acid and zinc supplementation in men on semen quality and live births among 2,300 couples planning infertility treatment.
BU finds Medicaid expansion improves access to postpartum care
A new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher finds that new mothers in a state that expanded Medicaid (Colorado) were more likely to keep Medicaid coverage and access postpartum care than those in a similar state that had not yet expanded Medicaid (Utah).
Genetic study provides most comprehensive map of risk to date of breast cancer risk
A major international study of the genetics of breast cancer has identified more than 350 DNA 'errors' that increase an individual's risk of developing the disease.
Genetic differences help distinguish type 1 diabetes in children from 'type 1.5' in adults
A multi-center team of researchers led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has discovered a genetic signature that could help distinguish an adult-onset form of diabetes sharing many type 1 diabetes (T1D) characteristics from pediatric-onset T1D, opening the door to potentially more straightforward diagnostic tests for the adult condition and improving responses by ensuring patients receive the most appropriate treatment.
Study reveals a new approach to enhancing response to immunotherapy in melanoma
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have identified a new way to boost the immune system's ability to fight cancer.
NASA planet hunter finds its 1st Earth-size habitable-zone world
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered its first Earth-size planet in its star's habitable zone, the range of distances where conditions may be just right to allow the presence of liquid water on the surface.
Cesarean delivery rates in China
This study assessed changes between 2008 and 2018 in the rate of cesarean deliveries in China.
Predictors of chronic migraine
A review and meta-analysis found predictors of chronic migraine. Depression, high frequency attacks, medication overuse and allodynia increased the chances for new onset chronic migraine, while annual income -- US$ 50,000 showed a protective effect.
Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams
The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams.
When college students post about depression on Facebook
When college students post about feelings of depression on Facebook, their friends are unlikely to encourage them to seek help, a small study suggests.
Hobbyist DNA services may be open to genetic hacking
Online services that allow users to upload their genetic information, research genealogy and find lost relatives may be vulnerable to a sort of genetic hacking that exposes users' genetic information, according to two geneticists at UC Davis.
Discoveries detail role of stem cell in deadly gastric cancer
A Cornell study provides important new insights into a common and deadly type of gastric cancer.
Can the flu shot help fight cancer?
Physicians and scientists at Rush University Medical Center have found that injecting tumors with influenza vaccines, including some FDA-approved seasonal flu shots, turns cold tumors to hot, a discovery that could lead to an immunotherapy to treat cancer.
Some surprisingly good news about anxiety
Anxiety disorders are the most common type of psychiatric illness, yet researchers know very little about factors associated with recovery.
Evidence linking 'vaping' to increased odds of asthma and COPD
Using data from a large federal government telephone survey of adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that inhaling heated tobacco vapor through e-cigarettes was linked to increased odds of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), conditions long demonstrated to be caused by smoking traditional, combustible cigarettes.
Geographers find tipping point in deforestation
University of Cincinnati geography researchers have identified a tipping point for deforestation that leads to rapid forest loss.
Human body temperature has decreased in the United States, Stanford study finds
Since the early 19th century, the average human body temperature in the United States has dropped, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Stanford researchers recommend 5 practices to improve doctor-patient relationships
Stanford researchers say they have identified five practices that doctors can implement to achieve more meaningful interactions with patients.
New production method for carbon nanotubes gets green light
A new method of producing carbon nanotubes -- tiny molecules with incredible physical properties used in touchscreen displays, 5G networks and flexible electronics -- has been given the green light by researchers, meaning work in this crucial field can continue.
Computerized training improves selective attention of soccer players
Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have demonstrated how computerized training -through a specific software- can improve the attentional capacity of athletes, particularly, soccer players.
Rural water wells in High Plains Aquifer show large increase in nitrate levels
Private well owners should test water quality annually, according to a recent Kansas State University study that revealed nitrate levels in shallow wells above US Environment Protection Act standards.
New study finds blood clots more likely in children who receive PICCs
A new study provides convincing evidence that the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to administer medicine and draw blood in children is associated with a significantly increased risk of blood clots (known as venous thromboembolism or VTE) compared with central venous catheters (CVCs) placed directly into the neck or chest.
'Are we waiting long enough?' Study raises questions on timing of intracranial pressure measurements
Careful monitoring of pressure within the skull (intracranial pressure, or ICP) is crucial for some neurocritical care patients.
How do outcomes for in-hospital cardiac arrest differ in patients treated with dialysis?
Among patients who experience cardiac arrest while in the hospital, those on dialysis were less likely to have a shockable rhythm and more likely to be outside of the intensive care unit at the time of arrest compared with patients not on dialysis.
Birds and bats have strange gut microbiomes -- probably because they can fly
Gut bacteria help us fight disease and digest food, but not all animals rely on their microbiomes the way we do.
Study of cardiac muscles in flies might help you keep your heart young
Iowa State University scientists restored the function of heart muscles in aging fruit flies, according to a newly published study.
If trees could talk: Using historic log structures to map migration of Europeans, Native Americans
Researchers at West Virginia University are using tree-ring dating to determine not only when trees were cut down to build historic log buildings in the region but also what the forests were like before European immigrants arrived.
Magnitude of Great Lisbon Earthquake may have been lower than previous estimates
The magnitude of the Great Lisbon Earthquake event, a historic and devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Portugal on All Saints' Day in 1755, may not be as high as previously estimated.
Zinc, folic acid supplements fail to enhance male fertility
Zinc and folic acid, a pair of dietary supplements long touted as an effective treatment for male infertility, failed to improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts, and sperm potency in a new study conducted at University of Utah Health and other medical centers in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health.
Need to control blood sugar? There's a drink for that, says UBC prof
With more people with diabetes and pre-diabetes looking for novel strategies to help control blood sugar, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that ketone monoester drinks--a popular new food supplement--may help do exactly that.
New method gives robust transistors
A new method to fit together layers of semiconductors as thin as a few nanometers has resulted in not only a scientific discovery but also a new type of transistor for high-power electronic devices.
From the mouths of babes: Lessons in humility
A poem written by Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, will be published Jan.
Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies
Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time.
FDA documents analysis reveals inadequate monitoring of safe opioid use program
A risk-management program set up in 2012 by the US Food and Drug Administration to curb improper prescribing of extended-release and long-acting opioids may not have been effective because of shortcomings in the program's design and execution, according to a paper from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Smart algorithm finds possible future treatment for childhood cancer
Using a computer algorithm, scientists at Uppsala University have identified a promising new treatment for neuroblastoma.
Ratings system may penalize hospitals serving vulnerable communities
Analysis of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare rating system shows that hospitals serving vulnerable communities may be judged on social factors outside of their control.
Scientists capture for first time, light flashes from human eye during radiotherapy
People have long reported seeing flashes of light during brain radiotherapy.
New Yorkers are initiating treatment earlier after HIV infection, study shows
An analysis of 28,162 New Yorkers diagnosed with HIV found considerable progress in rapid treatment initiation.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Scientists identify and characterise eight more deaths from Borna disease virus and suggest more cases could be identified
Eight newly-identified fatal cases of Borna disease virus 1 (BoDV-1) suggest that where the virus occurs in the wild, it could be behind a high proportion of severe and deadly cases of encephalitis, according to results from 56 patients who had developed signs of encephalitis over the past 20 years, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
Mayo Clinic researchers pursue single-dose gene therapy to treat cocaine addiction
In a radical new approach to treat cocaine addition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic are seeking approval for first-in-human studies of a single-dose gene therapy.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Blake's center off Australia's Kimberley Coast
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on January 7, 2019 and found the center of Tropical Storm Blake just of the Kimberley coast of Western Australia.
New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation
The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritised for protection, according to University of Queensland research.
The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees
Using long-term behavioral and hormonal data from wild chimpanzees in the Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, researchers from the Taï Chimpanzee Project at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, have revealed that mothers may be shaping pre-adult growth and offspring muscle mass even without direct provisioning.
Fast radio burst observations deepen astronomical mystery
Observations with the 8-meter Gemini North telescope, a program of the NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, have allowed astronomers to pinpoint the location of a Fast Radio Burst in a nearby galaxy -- making it the closest known example to Earth and only the second repeating burst source to have its location pinpointed in the sky.
Correcting vaccine misinformation is a difficult process, study shows
Researchers found that vaccine misinformation in Danish media outlets from 2013-2016 led to HPV vaccinations dropping by 50.4%.
Immune cell discovery opens door to new powerful cancer therapies
Scientists at UCL have identified how a subset of immune cells are activated to kill cancerous cells, a finding in mice which could hold the key to new powerful therapies against cancer.
Attosecond control of an atomic electron cloud
Researchers at SAGA Light Source, the University of Toyama, Hiroshima University and the Institute for Molecular Science have demonstrated a method to control the shape and orientation of an electron cloud in an atom by tuning the attosecond spacing in a double pulse of synchrotron radiation.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.