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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 08, 2020


Study: Early intervention of hyperkalemia cuts mortality in half
In a new study published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Adam Singer, MD, et al reported that quickly correcting high potassium levels, a condition known as hyperkalemia, in emergency department patients cut mortality in that population by half.
BAT study examines how people use vapor and tobacco heating products
The way consumers use vapor and tobacco heating products (THPs) can affect the levels of harmful and potentially harmful constituents they are exposed to, and a new study has analysed how the use of these products compares with cigarette smoking.
Study shows protein inhibitor as potential treatment approach for common mutations found in non-Hodgkin lymphomas
Study shows protein inhibitor as potential treatment approach for common mutations found in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
100 million years in amber: Researchers discover oldest fossilized slime mold
Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin.
Electric scooter injuries, hospital admissions in US
Electric scooters are increasingly used as fast and convenient transportation in the United States.
VR is not suited to visual memory?!
Toyohashi university of technology researcher and a research team at Tokyo Denki University have found that virtual reality (VR) may interfere with visual memory.
Nanoparticles deliver 'suicide gene' therapy to pediatric brain tumors growing in mice
Johns Hopkins researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a ''suicide gene'' to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice.
Fish species benefit from marine protection to varying extents
Marine protected areas reduce fish mortality by limiting harvesting and reducing habitat destruction.
Patient step counts predict lung cancer treatment outcomes, study finds
Numerous studies have shown that monitoring physical activity promotes better health -- from reducing body mass index to watching for signs of hypertension, for example.
A breath of fresh air for longer-running batteries
DGIST researchers are improving the performance of lithium-air batteries, bringing us closer to electric cars that can use oxygen to run longer before they need to recharge.
Bacterial link in celiac disease
Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.
Experiments into amorphous carbon monolayer lend new evidence to physics debate
A new study into two-dimensional amorphous carbon is providing answers to long-standing questions regarding the atomic makeup of bulk amorphous materials, opening the door to exciting device possibilities in the future.
Study examines childhood weight and obesity in adolescence
A new Pediatric Obesity study reveals how excess weight at age 3 years was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or obese at age 15 years in a study of adolescents in Japan.
Antipsychotic medications linked to brain injuries in individuals with Alzheimer's disease
New findings published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reveal that use of antipsychotic medications was associated with an increased risk of head injuries in a study of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.
Study examines the benefits of childbirth education classes during pregnancy
Participating in childbirth classes may help women have normal vaginal deliveries, according to a study published in the International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics.
New metabolic pathway discovered in rumen microbiome
Cows can adapt themselves to a fluctuating sodium content in their feed.
Scientists discover how TB puts the brakes on our immune engines
The scientists pinpointed a small mRNA molecule used by TB bacteria to shut down key engines that drive our immune response.
APS Tip Sheet: Improving quantum information processing
A new protocol compares the closeness of quantum states in information sent from different devices.
AI can be used to detect and grade prostate cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Tampere University in Finland have developed a method based on artificial intelligence for histopathological diagnosis and grading of prostate cancer.
Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.
Directly measuring function in tiny hearts
The amount of blood the heart pumps in one minute can be directly measured safely in newborns by monitoring changes in blood velocity after injecting saline, indicates the first clinical study of direct cardiac output measurement in newborns.
Greening at high latitudes may inhibit the expansion of midlatitude deserts
Besides inducing a stronger greenhouse effect, increasing carbon dioxide is also leading to global vegetation greening, especially in high latitudes, by the fertilization effect.
Study examines opioid involvement in US drug overdoses
A recent analysis published in Addiction reveals how fatal overdoses involving stimulants (cocaine and other psychostimulants, primarily methamphetamine) have been increasing over the past few years.
Cuttlefish use depth perception similar to vertebrate vision when hunting prey
Cuttlefish viewing a movie of shrimp through 3D glasses properly positioned themselves to strike the 'prey,' suggesting these cephalopods hunt using a process called 'stereopsis' to calculate depth based on the distance between overlapping images perceived by their left and right eyes.
Two drugs used in combination prove to be effective against most aggressive asbestos cancer in mice
Currently, there are few effective treatments for malignant mesothelioma, although it has been decades since it was found that the major risk factor is exposure to asbestos.
Better science through peer review
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
Neurons' energy organelle protected from damage linked to ALS, Alzheimer's
Mitochondrial damage is increasingly recognized as a key factor underlying neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS.
FSU study aids fight against HIV, hepatitis B
A discovery by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers is expected to open the door for new and more potent treatment options for many of the more than 36 million people worldwide infected with the HIV virus and for others chronically ill with hepatitis B.
Nanomaterial fabric destroys nerve agents in battlefield-relevant conditions
Northwestern University scientists have successfully combined a nanomaterial effective at destroying toxic nerve agents with textile fibers.
A molecular switch for stomach disease
A research team from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has revealed a new mechanism which controls the causes of infection with H. pylori, triggering the development of stomach diseases.
How dying cells prevent dangerous immune reactions
Dying cells in the body can keep the immune system in check, thus preventing unwanted immune responses against the body's own tissues.
Next generation wound gel treats and prevents infections
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new hydrogel based on the body's natural peptide defense.
Cellular clock regulating human spine development
After decades of effort, scientists use induced pluripotent stem cells to model human spine development.
Study reveals long-term benefits of weight loss surgery in adults with obesity and diabetes
Researchers recently conducted the largest study to date, which is published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, to evaluate the effectiveness of weight loss surgery in a Chinese population of individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes.
Tiny, but effective
Barely visible to the naked eye, gelatinous zooplankton is an important part of the marine ecosystem.
The use of fetal exome sequencing in prenatal diagnosis: A new ACMG Points to Consider
A new Points to Consider document from ACMG aims to assist referring physicians, laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors and other medical professionals in understanding the complexity and implications of exome sequencing in prenatal care.
The calm of the deer
Researchers investigate how the behavior of the wild animals is altered under the influence of lynxes and humans.
Persistence of gut microbial strains in twins, living apart after cohabitating for decades
Using a genomics strain-tracking bioinformatics tool, researchers investigated whether shared bacterial strains remain stable and resilient to changes in diet or environment after adult twins -- who had lived together for decades -- began to live apart.
Pretrial publicity hinders prosecutors' ability to prove guilt
Study finds media coverage is more likely to influence jurors to vote for acquittal than for conviction.
Genetic testing provides insights to sudden unexplained deaths in Amish community
Using an exome molecular autopsy, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., and his associates conducted genetic testing of four siblings who each died suddenly during exercise.
NUS scientists create world's first monolayer amorphous film
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have synthesised the world's first one-atom-thick amorphous material.
BU study finds celebrity disclosures increase discussion of miscarriage on twitter
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study characterizes how Twitter users discuss miscarriage and preterm birth.
Physical activity and dietary behavior parallel each other from childhood to adulthood
Consumption of fruits and vegetables is higher and more frequent in individuals who are physically active when compared to their less-active peers.
APS tip sheet: Spaghetti's impastable behavior
How noodles' mechanical properties control the way they soften.
Cigarette smoke damages our mental health, too
The researchers found that students who smoked had rates of clinical depression that were twice to three times higher than did their non-smoking peers.
Study: How US sewage plants can remove medicines from wastewater
A study of seven wastewater treatment plants in the Eastern United States points to two treatment methods -- granular activated carbon and ozonation -- as particularly promising.
Scientists recommend a customized regional climate model over Southeast Asia
It's difficult to model and reproduce the present climate over Southeast Asia.
Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge
Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8-1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimized cutting tools.
Nanobubbles in nanodroplets
Freiburg researchers investigate ultrafast reaction of superfluid helium triggered by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses.
Drones effective tools for fruit farmers
Unmanned aerial vehicles provide reliable, accurate data to growers.
Heart transplants from donors with hepatitis C may be safe and could help decrease organ shortage
One-year survival was 90% for adults with severe heart failure who received a heart transplant from a donor with hepatitis C, which was nearly identical to those who received a heart from donors who did not have hepatitis C (91%).
Pancreatic cancer cells secrete signal that sabotages immune attack on tumors
A key immune signal has a previously unknown role in turning off the immune system's attack on pancreatic cancer cells.
New research shows live chats can increase sales by nearly 16%
Live chat tools allow for communication between sellers and buyers.
BMI over time beats genetics in predicting future obesity
Genetic testing as a determinant of future obesity is not as effective as tracking a patient's BMI over time, a new study finds.
Examining vaping particle size and deposition
E-cigarette use is rising, particularly among young adults and teens.
Could pancreatitis be a stress hormone deficiency?
UT Southwestern researchers find that humans and mice with pancreatitis are deficient in a stress hormone called FGF21.
The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas
Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments.
UNH researchers solve protein structure associated with inherited retinal diseases
UNH Researchers have reported the first structural model for a key enzyme, and its activating protein, that can play a role in some genetically inherited eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and night blindness.
Pathways to changing the minds of climate deniers
By reviewing the psychology behind climate change rejection, a Stanford researcher suggests four approaches that can sway climate deniers and help overcome obstacles to implementing solutions.
Outbreak science: Infectious disease research leads to outbreak predictions
Infectious diseases have a substantially growing impact on the health of communities around the world and pressure to both predict and prevent such diseases is ever-growing.
An often-made claim that e-cigarettes are '95% safer' is not valid
The frequently cited claim that e-cigarettes are '95% less risky' or '95% less harmful' than combustible cigarettes is outdated, misleading and invalid -- and should no longer be made in discussions on the dangers of vaping, according to an editorial published today in the American Journal of Public Health by six leading experts on e-cigarettes and public health.
Report builds framework for 'digital political ethics' in 2020
With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media's role in US politics, four top universities have published a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections.
Planet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say Princeton scientists
A Princeton-led team of astrophysicists has shown that exoplanet WASP-12b, located 600 light-years away, is spiraling in toward certain destruction in about 3 million years.
Evidence of a human segmentation clock reveals how an embryo's vertebrae tick
To reproduce the molecular steps that lead to the proper formation of the human spine, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a model in a dish, allowing them to study just what makes our segmentation clock tick.
LED lighting in greenhouses helps but standards are needed
While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to Rutgers research that could help improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products.
New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus
Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group -- whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance.
A mother's bugs
Newborn mice derive protective antibodies from their mothers' microbiota. Antibodies derived from mothers' microbiota ward off both localized and widespread systemic infections by the bacterium E. coli.
Brazilian scientists unveil chemotherapy resistance mechanism related to p53 mutation
Brazilian study uncovered an anticancer chemotherapy resistance mechanism related to amyloid aggregation of mutant p53.
Abnormal neuron activity manifests as parental neglect
The malleability of the brain decreases with age, but scientists have identified certain life experiences that allow the adult brain to rewire.
Just don't eat it: Play Doh, dry pasta show little gluten transfer when used for play
Parents who worry their child with celiac disease may be exposed to gluten at school might be able to strike two common school substances -- Play Doh and dry, uncooked pasta -- from the exposure risk list, as long as children don't consume them.
Ocean acidification is damaging shark scales
Sharks have unusual type of scales referred to as 'denticles.' A research group from South Africa and Germany that includes Jacqueline Dziergwa and Professor Dr.
Ethnic groups have higher risk of developing a physical disability
Men and women from a South Asian background are more likely to develop a physical disability and struggle with day-to-day physical activities throughout adulthood compared with their white British counterparts, new research published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences reports.
Relation between physical violence and not having adequate check-ups during pregnancy
An international study led by the University of Granada has found that 9.8% of pregnant women in Andalusia fail to have sufficient check-ups during pregnancy -- that is, the number of hospital antenatal appointments they attend is lower than recommended.
How the rice blast fungus 'eats' its own cell wall to launch an attack
In response to environmental changes and nutrient starvation, cells are known to undergo extreme alterations.
Evolving landscape added fuel to Gobi Desert's high-speed winds
A new study finds that the dark, rocky landscape of the Hami basin in the Gobi Desert helped to make it one of the windiest places in China.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Blake and western Australia fires
Tropical cyclone Blake made landfall in the Kimberley coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image that showed its center inland with the storm extending to the southern part of the state where fires raged.
Study reveals sex differences in the global burden of glaucoma
Worldwide, the burden of glaucoma -- quantified as health loss -- is higher in men than in women, according to a recent analysis published in Acta Ophthalmologica.
Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment
A new survey of 1000 meat eaters finds support for the principles of veganism, but suggests most think it is inconvenient, expensive and a sacrifice in terms of taste.
Despite effective therapy, US rate of breast conservation lower than other countries
Patients treated in Europe or Asia were 2.6 times as likely to undergo breast conserving therapy rather than a mastectomy compared to those treated in North America when adjusted for clinically significant factors.
Complete filling of batches of nanopipettes
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Analytical Chemistry an efficient method for filling a batch of nanopipettes with a pore opening below 10 nanometer.
Urban health scare: E-scooters show alarming spike in injuries
Electric scooters are increasingly part of the crowded urban landscape, but a UC San Francisco study has found a major surge of injuries related to scooters, particularly among young adults.
Alcohol-related deaths have increased in the United States
An analysis of death certificates published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research suggests that the number of alcohol-related deaths doubled in the United States between 1999-2017.
Can sea star movement inspire better robots?
What researchers have learned about how a sea star accomplishes movement synchronization, given that it has no brain and a completely decentralized nervous system, might help us design more efficient robotics systems
Highlighting women's achievements makes them want to be the boss, research shows
Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows.
Research will help land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality
New digital tools will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to.
Does inflammatory bowel disease carry certain risks during pregnancy?
Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are more likely to undergo delivery by Caesarean section and face certain risks during pregnancy, according to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.
Are there shared genetic factors between weight and major psychiatric disorders?
Data from 1.3 million people were used to investigate genetic overlap between body mass index and major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression.
Public opinion on proposals in California to prevent firearm violence
This survey study assessed public opinion in California (overall and by firearm ownership status) on two proposals to prevent firearm injuries: an amnesty program that would allow individuals to turn in ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 bullets, no questions asked; and a law that prevents someone from buying a gun for five years if they have had two or more driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs convictions in five years.
Virus surfaces help MTU engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications
An isoelectric point is a common way to characterize viruses.
Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing
New research, published today in Nature, led by scientists at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, and at the Geological Survey of Israel, provides evidence from Siberian caves suggesting that summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an essential role in stabilising permafrost and its large store of carbon.
AI for #MeToo: Training algorithms to spot online trolls
Machine learning could be a powerful tool for allowing social media platforms to spot online trolls.
In health care, does 'hotspotting' make patients better?
The new health care practice of 'hotspotting' -- in which providers identify very high-cost patients and attempt to reduce their medical spending while improving care -- has virtually no impact on patient outcomes, according to a new study led by MIT economists.
Future patient care at risk unless health research protected and boosted
Health research faces a crisis that could impact on patient care, says a new report led by 10 prominent figures in the NHS and academia.
Palliative care in hospitals linked to decrease in use of ICU; treatment intensity
A new study shows that implementing hospital-based palliative care services in New York State reduces treatment intensity at the end of life for hospitalized patients.
Online patient tool is associated with increased likelihood of receiving kidney transplant
Patients with kidney failure who actively used an online patient portal to track the status of their health care improved their chances of getting a kidney transplant and shortened their wait times for an operation.
Cystic fibrosis carriers are at increased risk for cystic fibrosis-related conditions
A University of Iowa study challenges the conventional wisdom that having just one mutated copy of the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene has no effects on a person's health.
How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students
Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals.
Study finds losing a night of sleep may increase blood levels of Alzheimer's biomarker
A preliminary study by researchers at Uppsala University has found that when young, healthy men were deprived of just one night of sleep, they had higher levels of tau -- a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease -- in their blood than when they had a full, uninterrupted night of rest.
Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects
New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels.
New MPMI focus issue seeks to improve management of virus-induced disease in crops
The January focus issue of the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journal includes four reviews and several research articles covering a variety of current topics examining the cell biology of virus-plant and virus-vector interactions, including cellular RNA hubs, plasmodesmal functioning, tripartite interactions, mechanisms of host defense suppression, and biotechnological approaches to induce host resistance.
Affirmative action policies increased minority enrollment at Brazilian universities
Affirmative action policies (AAP) such as quota systems based on racial or socio-economic criteria are often recommended as a way to increase enrollment of underrepresented students in higher education.
How does your body respond to feelings of moral outrage? It depends on your politics
USC study finds that liberals and conservatives feel moral violations in different areas of their bodies, interpret them as distinct complex feelings and make different moral and political judgments.
Researchers surprised by high levels of alcohol consumption among cancer survivors
New research in JNCCN -- Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, using data from NHIS to examine self-reported drinking habits among people reporting a cancer diagnosis, finds 56.5% were current drinkers, 34.9% exceeded moderate drinking levels, and 21% engaged in binge drinking.
Nano antennas for data transfer
For the first time, physicists from the University of Würzburg have successfully converted electrical signals into photons and radiated them in specific directions using a low-footprint optical antenna that is only 800 nanometers in size.
A response key for survival of Mycoplasma genitalium in the urogenital tract uncovered
A study led by an IBB-UAB research team has managed to identify the mechanisms by which the sexually transmitted bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mge) can persist in conditions with very limited availability of metals, a circumstance it must face when infecting humans.
Smartphone cameras can speed up urinary tract infection diagnosis
Biological Engineers at the University of Bath have developed a test that could help medics quickly diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs), using a normal smartphone camera.
Probability of dying from road injury has dropped worldwide in all but 5 nations
Road injuries have become more frequent but less fatal over the past three decades, according to a new scientific study.
Catalytic protocells get zingy
Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy.
Routine HIV screening in general practice boosts testing and early diagnosis
Offering HIV screening to new patients in general practice on a routine basis increases testing rates and improves detection and earlier diagnosis, research co-led by Queen Mary University of London and UCL suggests.
Overweight and obesity linked to higher cancer risks in large Danish study
Overweight and obesity were associated with higher risks of several common cancers in a 40-year, nationwide Danish study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.
Views of rural US adults on serious health, economic issues in their communities
Nationally representative surveys from 2018 and 2019 were used to examine the views of adults in the rural US on the serious health and economic problems facing their communities, including the cost and access to health care and addiction to opioids.
Are some antidepressants less risky for pregnant women?
About one in ten women in Québec will suffer from depression during pregnancy.
'She' goes missing from presidential language
MIT researchers have found that although a significant percentage of the American public believed the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman, people rarely used the pronoun 'she' when referring to the next president before the election.
How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?
Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host.
New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections
New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D.
Gut microbes may improve stroke recovery
New research shows that short chain fatty acids could help protect brain cells from damage caused by inflammation after a stroke.
How rattlesnakes' scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies (video)
During storms in the southwestern US, some rattlesnakes drink rain droplets from scales on their backs.
Researchers discover a new auto-inflammatory disease called CRIA syndrome
Over the last 20 years, three families have been unsuspectingly linked by an unknown illness.
Towards sustainability -- from a by-product of the biodiesel industry to a valuable chemical
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) develop a cheap and efficient copper-based catalyst that can be used to convert glycerol, one of the main by-products of the biodiesel industry, into a valuable compound called dihydroxyacetone.
People view rationality and reasonableness as distinct principles of judgment
When it comes to making sound judgements, most people understand and distinguish that being rational is self-serving and being reasonable is fair and balanced, finds new research from the University of Waterloo.
Lifestyle choices could slow familial frontotemporal dementia
A physically and mentally active lifestyle confers resilience to frontotemporal dementia (FTD), even in people whose genetic profile makes the eventual development of the disease virtually inevitable, according to new research by scientists at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center.
Certain steps help lead to healthy pregnancies in women with rheumatoid arthritis
For women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), taking certain steps to ensure that they have a healthy pregnancy leads to a reduced risk of complicated birth or miscarriage, according to a study in Arthritis Care & Research.
Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time
DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University.
Automobile law in Japan has improved air quality
A law passed in Japan in 1992 aimed to improve urban air quality by banning vehicles that violated certain emission standards from being registered in designated areas.
Children's Hospital Colorado uncovers largest US outbreak of neurologic disease to date
The Lancet Infectious Diseases recently published the results of an observational study conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado that led to a discovery of the largest outbreak of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the United States.
The start of biological spring in Africa is linked to the quantity of hours of sunshine
The start of the increase in the verdure of vegetation (equivalent to the start of spring) in Africa is directly connected to the amount of hours of sunshine a day, that is to say the it would be the 'photoperiod' which controls this process and not the arrival of the first rains, as was believed until now.
Scientists improve yield predictions based on seedling data
A doctor diagnosing a 50-year-old patient based on a blood test taken during the patient's infancy would be unthinkable.
Shifting clinic culture to address the opioid epidemic
At a family medicine clinic in the Boston area, a team led by faculty from Tufts University School of Medicine conducted a five-year case study where they found medical facilities can help physicians to treat chronic pain in a way that will deter opioid misuse, while creating better processes to identify and treat patients who develop an opioid use disorder.
Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years
Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida's waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.
Plant-derived SVC112 hits cancer stem cells, leaves healthy cells alone
Study shows Colorado drug SVC112 stops production of proteins that cancer stem cells need to survive and grow.
Marijuana detected in homicide victims nearly doubles
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health assessed the time trends in alcohol and marijuana detected in homicide victims and found that the prevalence of marijuana almost doubled, increasing from 22 percent in 2004 to 42 percent in 2016.
Oregon researchers test hearing by looking at dilation of people's eyes
University of Oregon neuroscientists have shown that a person's hearing can be assessed by measuring dilation of the pupils in eyes, a method that is as sensitive as traditional methods of testing hearing.
Illuminating the world of nanoparticles
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.
Double-checking the science
Biologists help debunk previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly as oceans gets more acidic due to climate change.
Skin-like sensors bring a human touch to wearable tech
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a super-stretchy, transparent and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin.
Human immune cells produced in a dish in world first
A Melbourne research team has reproduced and visualised the earliest developmental steps in human immune cell production in the laboratory and are now set to advance our understanding of childhood diseases like leukemia and autoimmune conditions.
Less-than-perfect kidneys can be successfully used for transplants, study shows
A new Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study provides the strongest evidence to date that hundreds of deceased donor kidneys, discarded each year after being deemed not suitable under current medical criteria, can be transplanted safely and effectively.
Egg-based flu vaccines: Not all they're cracked up to be?
Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death.
APS Tip Sheet: Trudging until take-off
Allowing slower airplane passengers to board first decreases total boarding time.
Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization
Division of labor and political polarization may be driven by the same processes, say Princeton University computational biologists Chris Tokita and Corina Tarnita.
Penn study paves way for new vaccines to protect infants against infections
A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines.
MDI biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%
Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.
Identification of signature genes associated with therapeutic resistance to anti-VEGF therapy
To establish a molecular signature of this resistance in ovarian cancer, the authors developed preclinical tumor models of adaptive resistance to chronic anti-VEGF treatment.
This drug could save their lives, but less than 2% of them get it
Only a tiny minority of people at risk for an opioid overdose actually are prescribed a drug that could save their lives, a new study suggests.
Findings on education, malnutrition 'deeply disturbing'
For the first time, researchers have mapped years of education and child malnutrition across all low- and middle-income countries at the level of individual districts.
New Phytopathology journal focus issue emphasizes virological advances
Given the importance of and rapid research progress in plant virology in recent years, Phytopathology emphasized virological advances in its Fundamental Aspects of Plant Viruses focus issue, which is available now.

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