Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 10, 2020


Medicaid expansion associated with fewer opioid overdose deaths across the US
The expansion of Medicaid coverage for low-income adults permitted by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with a 6% reduction in total opioid overdose deaths nationally, according to new research from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and University of California, Davis.
SuperTIGER on its second prowl -- 130,000 feet above Antarctica
A balloon-borne scientific instrument designed to study the origin of cosmic rays is taking its second turn high above the continent of Antarctica three and a half weeks after its launch.
NASA satellite sees Blake's remnants bringing desert rain to Western Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the remnant clouds and storms associated with Ex-tropical Cyclone Blake as it continues to move through Western Australia and generate rainfall over desert areas.
Long-term medication for schizophrenia is safe
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and their colleagues in Germany, the USA and Finland have studied the safety of very long-term antipsychotic therapy for schizophrenia.
Pearls of wisdom
Researchers in the Marine Genomics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in collaboration with scientists from Mie Prefecture, Japan, have, using genome-wide genetic data from specimens collected across the western Pacific, elucidated how pearl oyster populations vary genetically and geographically.
Low-fat diet linked to lower testosterone levels in men
For the many men diagnosed with testosterone deficiency, losing weight can help increase testosterone levels.
Deep learning, 3D technology to improve structure modeling, create better drugs
Purdue University researchers have designed a novel approach to use deep learning to better understand how proteins interact in the body - paving the way to producing accurate structure models of protein interactions involved in various diseases and to design better drugs that specifically target protein interactions.
What happens to deferred intentions in the brain?
Placing a checkmark on the to-do list is an extremely liberating feeling for many eager list lovers, especially when the task has been postponed for a long time.
Plants found to speak roundworm's language
Nematodes are tiny, ubiquitous roundworms that infect plant roots, causing more than $100 billion in crop damage worldwide each year.
Trace Metals in Leatherback Turtle Eggs May Harm Consumers
Leatherback turtle eggs in the Panamanian Caribbean may be harmful to the health of consumers, due to the concentrations of trace metals found in them.
Speech-disrupting brain disease reflects patients' native tongue
English and Italian speakers with dementia-related language impairment experience distinct kinds of speech and reading difficulties based on features of their native languages, according to new research by scientists at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center and colleagues at the Neuroimaging Research Unit and Neurology Unit at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan.
Researchers develop new protocol to generate intestinal organoids in vitro
Boston researchers have developed a new way to generate groups of intestinal cells that can be used, among others, to make disease models in the lab to test treatments for diseases affecting the gastrointestinal system.
Technique allows dolphin pregnancy exams to mirror those in humans
In a groundbreaking study just published in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound, scientists have developed a new ultrasound technique for evaluating dolphin fetuses at all stages of gestation.
Mayo Clinic discovers a molecular switch for repairing central nervous system disorders
A molecular switch has the ability to turn on a substance in animals that repairs neurological damage in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Mayo Clinic researchers discovered.
Study finds 95 percent satisfaction rate with Mohs surgery
Patients who received Mohs surgery to treat the most serious form of skin cancer, melanoma, reported a 95 percent long-term satisfaction rate with their results, according to a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center dermatologists.
Deep learning differentiates small renal masses on multiphase CT
According to an ahead-of-print article in the March issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a deep learning method with a convolutional neural network can support the evaluation of small (?
Always counterclockwise
Human behavior is influenced by many things, most of which remain unconscious to us.
New study finds 8% of Chinese men are problem drinkers
A new large study of Chinese adults, published by the scientific journal Addiction, has found that eight percent of men in China are problem drinkers, and that problem drinking is more prevalent among men of lower socioeconomic status and in rural areas.
Hummingbirds' rainbow colors come from pancake-shaped structures in their feathers
Hummingbirds are some of the most brightly-colored things in the entire world.
Scientists develop 'Twitter' for cells
Computational biologists led by Professor Yvan Saeys (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) developed a new bioinformatics method to better study communication between cells.
When David poses as Goliath
Recently, a Chinese team of astronomers claimed to have discovered a black hole as massive as 70 solar masses, which, if confirmed, would severely challenge the current view of stellar evolution.
Antibiotics could be promising treatment for form of dementia
Researchers at the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine have found that a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides could be a promising treatment for frontotemporal dementia.
Gasification goes green
Rice University engineers have created a light-powered nanoparticle that could shrink the carbon footprint of syngas producers.
It's not about East and West, it's about top and bottom
Overall, 93% of the German populace feels valued in their everyday lives, whereas far fewer -- but still one out two (52%) -- feel disrespected.
Satellite constellations harvest energy for near-total global coverage
A National Science Foundation-sponsored collaboration led by Patrick Reed, the Joseph C.
Moffitt researchers identify molecular characteristics of leptomeningeal melanoma metastases
Very little information is known about the molecular development of leptomeningeal melanoma metastases (LMM), making it difficult to develop effective therapies.
Transformative 3D printing approach established from insight into developmental biology
Engineers need to get more creative in their approach to design and additive manufacturing (AM) systems, by taking inspiration from the way humans grow and develop, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.
Unused stockpiles of nuclear waste could be more useful than we might think
Chemists have found a new use for the waste product of nuclear power -- transforming an unused stockpile into a versatile compound which could be used to create valuable commodity chemicals as well as new energy sources.
Plant physiology: One size may not suit all
A new study published by biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich demonstrates that there are no simple or universal solutions to the problem of engineering plants to enable them to cope with the challenges posed by climate change.
Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims
Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men -- stories long dismissed as myths.
New open-source software judges accuracy of computer predictions of cancer genetics
Researchers at the Crick, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Oregon Health & Science University, the Oxford Big Data Institute, and the University of Toronto have created new open-source software which determines the accuracy of computer predictions of genetic variation within tumor samples.
Lonely in a crowd: Overcoming loneliness with acceptance and wisdom
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found the main characteristics of loneliness in a senior housing community and the strategies residents use to overcome it.
Broadest study to date of Bornean elephants yields insight into their habitat selection
In collaboration with scientists from Danau Girang Field Centre, Harvard University, and the South East Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, scientists from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) led the broadest study to date that assesses how elephants utilize different landscapes in Sabah.
Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off
The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter.
Malnutrition linked with increased risk of Zika birth defects
Environmental factors, such as the diets of pregnant women, have been shown to have an effect on the extent and severity of developmental malformations in babies associated with Zika virus (ZIKV) congenital infection.
Laserphysics: At the pulse of a light wave
Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) have developed a novel type of detector that enables the oscillation profile of light waves to be precisely determined.
Water governance: Could less sometimes be more?
Does the never-ending introduction of new regulations of environmental resources have a positive effect?
Losing tongue fat improves sleep apnea
Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the effect of weight loss on the upper airway in obese patients, researchers found that reducing tongue fat is a primary factor in lessening the severity of OSA.
Massachusetts General Hospital performs first-of-its-kind heart transplant in New England
Mass General Hospital recently performed the largest number of adult heart transplants in the country using what are known as Donation after Circulatory Death (DCD) donor hearts.
New function for potential tumor suppressor in brain development
New research from the group of Simon Hippenmeyer, professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), has now uncovered a novel, opposite role for Cdkn1c.
Reducing aluminium intake can minimize potential health risks
Consumers can take up aluminium compounds from various sources, such as food, cosmetic products like aluminium containing antiperspirants and toothpaste, food contact materials like uncoated aluminium menu or baking trays and drugs.
Shocked meteorites provide clues to Earth's lower mantle
An international team of scientists have completed a complex analysis of a ''shocked meteorite'' and gained new insight into Earth's lower mantle.
Explosion or collapse?
A group of scientists, among them several from GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and from Technical University of Darmstadt, succeeded to experimentally determine characteristics of nuclear processes in matter ten million times denser and 25 times hotter than the center of our sun.
An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic
ETH researchers have created an incredibly lightweight 18-carat gold, using a matrix of plastic in place of metallic alloy elements.
Molecular 'doormen' open the way to potential obesity treatment
Fat cells are filled with droplets coated by molecules that act like hotel doormen: These 'doormen' control cellular access for nutrients as well as for the exit of energy-supplying molecules called lipids.
Hikikomori: New definition helps identify, treat extreme social isolation
Experts in the Japanese phenomena of hikikomori say the condition of extreme social isolation is more widespread than previously acknowledged, and it deserves a clear and consistent definition to improve treatment across the globe.
Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants Linked to Reading Problems
A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems.
No need to draw blood -- smart photonic contact lens for diabetic diagnosis and retinopathy treatment
Sei Kwang Hahn and his research team from POSTECH developed a smart LED contact lens.
MU scientists find oldest-known fossilized digestive tract -- 550 million years
An analysis of tubular fossils by scientists led by Jim Schiffbauer at the University of Missouri provides evidence of a 550-million-year-old digestive tract -- one of the oldest known examples of fossilized internal anatomical structures -- and reveals what scientists believe is a possible answer to the question of how these animals are connected.
'Superdiamond' carbon-boron cages can trap and tap into different properties
A new class of 'superdiamond' carbon-based materials has tunable mechanical and electronic properties while retaining robust, diamond-liked bonds.
Visualizing chemical reactions, e.g. from H2 and CO2 to synthetic natural gas
Scientists at EPFL have designed a reactor that can use IR thermography to visualize dynamic surface reactions and correlate it with other rapid gas analysis methods to obtain a holistic understanding of the reaction in rapidly changing conditions.
Research shows nasal spray antidote is easiest to give for opioid overdose
Of three possible ways for people to deliver the life-saving antidote naloxone to a person experiencing an opioid overdose, the use of a nasal spray was the quickest and easiest according to research conducted by William Eggleston, clinical assistant professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and colleagues at SUNY Upstate Medical University.
Taking one for the team: How bacteria self-destruct to fight viral infections
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers have discovered how a new immune system works to protect bacteria from phages, viruses that infect bacteria -- new information that could be leveraged to improve treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections by refining phage therapy.
New research uses optical solitons in lasers to explore naturally-occurring supramolecules
Researchers have collaborated to gain insight into naturally-occurring molecular systems using optical solitons in lasers.
New cellular player involved in obesity discover
The group also found that in experimental disease models that mimic the development of human obesity, loss of iRhom2 results in less fat accumulation in the body.
Scientists examine how a gut infection may produce chronic symptoms
For some unlucky people, a bout of intestinal distress like traveler's diarrhea leads to irritable bowel syndrome.
Chromatin organizes itself into 3D 'forests' in single cells
Scientists are increasingly interested in the function of chromatin -- a mix of DNA and protein within chromosomes -- and its role in disease.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Debbie Millman: Designing Our Lives
From prehistoric cave art to today's social media feeds, to design is to be human. This hour, designer Debbie Millman guides us through a world made and remade–and helps us design our own paths.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Insomnia Line
Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what'd Radiolab decide to do?  Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week's experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through.   This episode was produced by Lulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life? Sign up for our newsletter! We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows, funny Youtube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.