Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 13, 2020


Vitamin B6, leukemia's deadly addiction
Researchers from CSHL and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have discovered how Acute Myeloid Leukemia is addicted to vitamin B6.
Yale-led team finds parents can curb teen drinking and driving
Binge drinking by teenagers in their senior year of high school is a strong predictor of dangerous behaviors later in life, including driving while impaired (DWI) and riding with an impaired driver (RWI), according to a new Yale-led study.
Common foods can help 'landscape' the jungle of our gut microbiome
Foods such as honey, licorice, oregano, and hot sauce have an antimicrobial effect and some of them trigger phage production in our gut.
APS tip sheet: High energy gamma rays
Nine Galactic sources are the highest-energy gamma -ray sources ever detected, which could suggest the presence of Galactic accelerators.
Team builds the first living robots
Scientists repurposed living frog cells -- and assembled them into entirely new life-forms.
Burnout linked with irregular heartbeat
Feeling excessively tired, devoid of energy, demoralized, and irritable? You may have burnout, a syndrome associated with a potentially deadly heart rhythm disturbance.
Can solar geoengineering mitigate both climate change and income inequality?
New research from the University of California San Diego finds that solar geoengineering -- the intentional reflection of sunlight away from the Earth's surface -- may reduce income inequality between countries.
Study: Humanity's footprint is squashing world's wildlife
Using the most comprehensive dataset on the 'human footprint,' which maps the accumulated impact of human activities on the land's surface, researchers from WCS, University of Queensland, and other groups found intense human pressures across the range of a staggering 20,529 terrestrial vertebrate species.
Inside story on cassowary evolution
One of the largest living birds, the cassowary, has a simple throat structure similar to the fellow Australian emu.
First robust cell culture model for the hepatitis E virus
A mutation switches the turbo on during virus replication. This is a blessing for research.
Study questions routine troponin testing for ACS in geriatric patients with NSCs
The results of a study conducted by researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine may not support troponin testing for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in selected elderly patients with nonspecific complaints (NCSs).
Why did we give sailors and soldiers shark repellent that ... didn't work? (video)
People have been developing different forms of shark repellent for decades -- the military even issued a chemical shark repellent called 'Shark Chaser' to pilots, sailors, and astronauts(!) from the end of World War II through the start of the Vietnam War.
Study suggests biological clock is key to reducing heart damage from radiation therapy
A new study suggests that the biological clock is involved in heart toxicity from radiation therapy and could be harnessed as part of a preventive strategy.
Implementing post-genomic personalized medicine: The rise of glycan biomarkers
An in-depth look at the science of glycobiology and glycan diagnostics, and their promise in personalized medicine in the current post-genomic era are featured in a special issue of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, the peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
Artificial muscle sheets transform stem cells into bone
Specifically programmed materials can, under specific conditions, encourage stem cells to transform into bone cells -- as revealed by a German research team under the leadership of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research.
Experimental therapy may offer hope for rare genetic disorders
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a new way to alleviate problems caused by dysfunctional mitochondria, which are the ''powerhouses'' that produce energy in cells
Reducing the risk of blood clots in artificial heart valves
People with mechanical heart valves need blood thinners on a daily basis, because they have a higher risk of blood clots and stroke.
Nanosatellites improve detection of early-season corn nitrogen stress
For corn growers, the decision of when and how much nitrogen fertilizer to apply is a perennial challenge.
When pregnant moms are stressed out, babies' brains suffer
Knowing that your unborn fetus has congenital heart disease causes such pronounced maternal stress, anxiety and depression that these women's fetuses end up with impaired development in key brain regions before they are born, according to research published online Jan.
Online educational videos boost cancer knowledge
Online health videos can be an important source of cancer education, according to Rutgers researchers.
Hospital critical care resuscitation unit improves patients' chances of survival
Patients with acutely life-threatening health conditions who were treated in the innovative Critical Care Resuscitation Unit (CCRU) received faster treatment and had better health outcomes, including a 36 percent lower risk of dying than those who were transferred from a hospital's emergency department then evaluated and treated in a traditional intensive care unit, according to a recent study in the Journal of Emergency Medicine conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
Engineers develop 'chameleon metals' that change surfaces in response to heat
Martin Thuo and his research group have found a way to use heat to predictably and precisely change the surface structure of a particle of liquid metal.
Record-setting ocean warmth continued in 2019
A new analysis conducted by an international team shows that the world's oceans were the warmest in 2019 than any other time in recorded human history, especially between the surface and a depth of 2,000 meters, and that the past ten years have been the warmest on record for global ocean temperatures, with the past five years holding the highest record.
Study finds novel molecular therapeutic target for colon cancer
Researchers have found a way to help make chemotherapy more effective in treating colon cancer.
Higher rates of post-natal depression among autistic mothers
Autistic mothers are more likely to report post-natal depression compared to non-autistic mothers, according to a new study of mothers of autistic children carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge.
Global database of all bird species shows how body shape predicts lifestyle
A database of 10,000 bird species shows how measurements of wings, beaks and tails can predict a species' role in an ecosystem.
Researchers solve a scientific mystery about evaporation
Evaporation can explain why water levels drop in a full swimming pool, but it also plays an important role in industrial processes ranging from cooling electronics to power generation.
Customer reviews and health inspections drive consistent good hygiene at restaurants
Eating out, ordering in or carrying out? Most Americans indulge in some form of restaurant eating.
Accelerated speed of discovery could lead to more effective smoking cessation aids
As smokers know all too well, nicotine is highly addictive.
College students use more marijuana in states where it's legal, but they binge drink less
Marijuana use among college students has been trending upward for years, but in states that have legalized recreational marijuana, use has jumped even higher.
Surrey lithium monitor could improve lives of people suffering from bipolar
A wearable lithium drug monitor developed by the University of Surrey could change the lives of patients who suffer from bipolar and depression.
Machine keeps human livers alive for one week outside of the body
Researchers from the University Hospital Zurich, ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for one week.
Tuning optical resonators gives researchers control over transparency
Using a nanoparticle as a ''tuning device,'' researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a way to control electromagnetically induced transparency -- a feature of light which allows it to pass through opaque media.
WSU study aims to prevent adverse drug reactions in dogs
If not identified before surgery, a rare genetic mutation could result in your dog being exposed to dangerously high levels of anesthetic agents.
Isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride reveals high thermal conductivity
An international team of physicists, materials scientists, and mechanical engineers has confirmed the high thermal conductivity predicted in isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride, the researchers report in the electronic edition of the journal Science. c-BN is particularly challenging to make and it's difficult to measure its thermal conductivity accurately when the value is high.
New mechanism may safely prevent and reverse obesity
Researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have discovered that a receptor found in almost all cells plays a big role in the body's metabolism.
A single gene for scent reception separates two species of orchid bees
Orchid bees are master perfumers. Males collect chemicals to concoct perfumes unique to their specific species.
A new model of metabolism draws from thermodynamics and 'omics'
Scientists at EPFL have developed an algorithm that can model biochemical reactions from metabolism down to RNA synthesis with unprecedented accuracy.
Research identifies possible on/off switch for plant growth
New research from UC Riverside identifies a protein that controls plant growth -- good news for an era in which crops can get crushed by climate change.
How the solar system got its 'Great Divide,' and why it matters for life on Earth
Scientists have finally scaled the solar system's equivalent of the Rocky Mountain range.
High temperatures due to global warming will be dramatic even for tardigrades
A research group from Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen has just shown that tardigrades are very vulnerable to long-term high temperature exposures.
Prolonged ECG monitoring of ED patients with syncope is safe alternative to hospitalization
Prolonged cardiac rhythm monitoring will improve arrhythmia diagnostic yield among non-low-risk emergency department patients with syncope.
Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows
Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance.
Physicists prove that 2D and 3D liquids are fundamentally different
A 50-year-old puzzle in statistical mechanics has been solved by an international team of researchers who have proved that two-dimensional (2D) liquids have fundamentally different dynamical properties to three-dimensional (3D) liquids.
Neutrophils are equipped with a 'disarmament' program that prevents the immune system going 'out of control'
The new finding, published in Nature Immunology, could have major implications for the understanding and treatment of disorders such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and acute inflammatory processes.
CLICS: World's largest database of cross-linguistic lexical associations
A team of scientists, led by scholars from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has published a new version of the Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications (CLICS), covering lexical associations in more than 3,100 languages varieties.
Rising temperatures may cause over 2,000 fatal injuries per year in the US, predict researchers
A 2 degrees Celsius rise in temperatures could result in around 2,100 additional deaths from injuries every year in the United States.
Calculated surprise leads to groundbreaking discovery in cognitive control research
To better understand how motivational control processes help maximize performance when faced with task challenges, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and provide fascinating insights into the role of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a component network of brain regions that support motivated behavior.
Study finds potential new treatment for preventing post traumatic stress disorder
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada, discovers first biomarker unique to PTSD patients and creates a peptide show in a preclinical trial to treat and even prevent PTSD.
Influential electrons? Physicists uncover a quantum relationship
A team of physicists has mapped how electron energies vary from region to region in a particular quantum state with unprecedented clarity.
Man versus machine: Can AI do science?
A team of scientists based at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), the University of Munich and the CNRS at the University of Bordeaux have shown that machines can beat theoretical physicists at their own game, solving complex problems just as accurately as scientists, but considerably faster.
Unique Toronto-based clinical trial reveals new subtypes of advanced pancreatic cancer
Researchers at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and the University Health Network (UHN) have discovered detailed new information about the subtypes of pancreatic cancer.
Risk of lead exposure linked to decreased brain volume in adolescents
In a study using brain scans from nearly 10 thousand adolescents across the country, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles show that risk of lead exposure is associated with altered brain anatomy and cognitive deficits in children from low income families.
Using light to learn
Maintaining long-term memories requires environmental light, according to research in fruit flies recently published in JNeurosci.
Collision helped make the Milky Way -- and now we know when
Researchers have pinpointed an early galactic merger that helped shape the Milky Way.
Cell growth: Intricate network of potential new regulatory mechanisms has been decoded
Whether a cell grows, divides or dies is controlled among other things by receptors that messenger substances bind to externally.
Atlantic circulation collapse could cut British crop farming
Crop production in Britain will fall dramatically if climate change causes the collapse of a vital pattern of ocean currents, new research suggests.
Iodine may slow ozone layer recovery
Air pollution and iodine from the ocean contribute to damage of Earth's ozone layer.
Connecting the dots in the sky could shed new light on dark matter
Astrophysicists have come a step closer to understanding the origin of a faint glow of gamma rays covering the night sky.
Participants in environmental health studies vulnerable to re-identification
Before sharing human research data, scientists routinely strip it of personal information such as name, address, and birthdate in order to protect the privacy of their study participants.
Lower levels of lymphocyte blood cells may indicate increased risk of death
Lower levels of lymphocyte blood cells -- a condition called lymphopenia -- could be an early warning for future illness, as low counts were associated with a 60% increase in death from any cause, found a Danish study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Brain pressure controls eye pressure, revealing new avenues for glaucoma treatment
Neuroscientists have discovered that eye and brain pressure are physiologically connected.
Boost to lung immunity following infection
The strength of the immune system in response to respiratory infections is constantly changing, depending on the history of previous, unrelated infections, according to new research from the Crick.
Connector fungi offer new clues to fate of nitrogen in warming tundra
Northern Arizona University researchers Rebecca Hewitt and Michelle Mack authored a paper, published this week in New Phytologist, that could have implications for researchers and computer models that predict where nitrogen and carbon go at both regional and global levels.
Climate change increases the risk of wildfires confirms new review
Human-induced climate change promotes the conditions on which wildfires depend, increasing their likelihood -- according to a review of research on global climate change and wildfire risk published today.
Widespread droughts affect southern California water sources six times a century
A University of Arizona-led study used the annual growth rings of trees to reconstruct a long-term climate history and examine the duration and frequency of ''perfect droughts'' in Southern California's main water sources.
TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy
A single bright star in the constellation of Indus, visible from the southern hemisphere, has revealed new insights on an ancient collision that our galaxy the Milky Way underwent with another smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus early in its history.
Circular RNA limits skin cancer spread
A mysterious piece of genetic material restrains the spread of skin cancer cells, but is frequently lost as they mature, a new study finds.
Using caffeine as a tool to study information processing
Researchers are using caffeine to study how the brain processes information, and a new study shows the effectiveness of this approach.
Study identifies genetic anomaly associated with poor response to common asthma treatment
A new Cleveland Clinic study has uncovered a genetic anomaly associated with poor response to a common asthma treatment.
Meteorite contains the oldest material on Earth: 7-billion-year-old stardust
Scientists have discovered the oldest solid material on Earth: 7-billion-year-old stardust trapped inside a meteorite.
Bacteria shredding tech to fight drug-resistant superbugs
New technology uses nano-sized particles of magnetic liquid metal to shred bacteria and bacterial biofilm.
Historical housing disparities linked with dangerous climate impacts
Extreme heat kills more people in the United States than any other type of hazardous weather and will likely become even deadlier due to climate change.
Nano-objects of desire: Assembling ordered nanostructures in 3D
A new DNA-programmable nanofabrication platform organizes inorganic or biological nanocomponents in the same prescribed ways.
Connecting the dots in the migraine brain
This dMRI study pointed to the structural strengthening of connections involving subcortical regions associated with pain processing and weakening in connections involving cortical regions associated with hyperexcitability may coexist in migraine.
How retailers can make more money in online auctions
To get more participants in online auctions and drive up the winning bid prices, two things matter: how long an auction is active and the day of the week it closes, finds researchers from the University Maryland, Stanford University, University of Pennsylvania and Indiana University.
Researchers find minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic Achilles tendon disorder improves patient outcomes and reduces recovery time
A minimally invasive procedure to treat a common foot and ankle disorder can reduce pain, recovery time, and postsurgery complications while improving functional outcomes.
New study reveals international movements of Atlantic tarpon, need for protection
MIAMI--The results of an 18-year study of Atlantic tarpon by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science revealed that these large silvery fish take extensive seasonal migrations--1,000s of kilometers in distance--beyond US borders.
HPV status may affect risk of early death in patients with oropharynx cancer
New research published in CANCER indicates that there is a higher risk of early death among patients with oropharynx cancer when not caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), than those whose tumors are HPV-positive.
First come, first bred
Arriving early in the breeding area is crucial for successful reproduction also in non-migratory birds.
AI can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerprick test
A new technology for detecting low glucose levels via ECG using a noninvasive wearable sensor, which with the latest artificial intelligence can detect hypoglycemic events from raw ECG signals has been made by researchers from the University of Warwick.
Investigational drugs block bone loss in mice receiving chemotherapy
Studying mice, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Climate gas budgets highly overestimate methane discharge from Arctic Ocean
There is a huge seasonal variability in methane seeps in the Arctic Ocean, according to a new paper in Nature Geoscience.
EU project RES URBIS shows the viability of bioplastic generation with urban biowaste
In a circular economy the city waste being turned into resources, is of great importance considering more than 70% of the inhabitants in Europe live in urban areas.
ASU and Virginia Tech researchers unlock mysteries of grasshopper response to gravity
How do insects control the effects of gravity when they climb a tree or hang upside-down waiting for prey?
Life's clockwork: Scientist shows how molecular engines keep us ticking
In the The Demon in the Machine, physicist Paul Davies argues that what's missing in the definition of life is how biological processes create 'information,' and such information storage is the stuff of life, like person's ability to solve complex problems.
'Swiss cheese' bones could be cause of unexplained low back pain
In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue.
Interactive virtual counselor promotes patient-provider communication about breast density
Half of women undergoing mammography have dense breasts. Mandatory dense breast notification and educational materials have been shown to confuse women rather than empower them.
'Ageotypes' provide window into how individuals age, Stanford study reports
Stanford scientists have identified specific biological pathways along which individuals age over time.
Leviathan polymer brush made with E. coli holds bacteria at bay
A lab accident produced a monster of a polymer brush, an emerging biocompatible material that staves off bacteria while coating and lubricating.
Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless
Refugees are often the target of hate speech on social media, but researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are now leveraging artificial intelligence to identify and highlight sympathetic and supportive social media posts.
Stars need a partner to spin Universe's brightest explosions
When it comes to the biggest and brightest explosions seen in the Universe, University of Warwick astronomers have found that it takes two stars to make a gamma-ray burst.
NASA tracking Tropical Storm Claudia battling wind shear
Tropical Storm Claudia is battling wind shear as it continues moving away from Western Australia and through the Southern Indian Ocean.
Long-term memory performance depends upon gating system, study finds
Why do we remember some experiences for our entire lives but quickly forget others?
Global diets are converging, with benefits and problems
Research carried out by the University of Kent has shown that diets are changing in complex ways worldwide.
Herpes simplex viruses: new relationships between epidemiology and history
An Italian research team has refined the history and origins of two extremely common pathogens in human populations, herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2.
Arabian Peninsula a trap for summer dust
Summer dust has been increasing over the Arabian Peninsula for the past decade with global implications.
Study sheds light on link between cannabis, anxiety and stress
A molecule produced by the brain that activates the same receptors as marijuana is protective against stress by reducing anxiety-causing connections between two brain regions, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report.
Vanderbilt-led team discovers new genetic disease and defines underlying mechanism
An international research team has discovered a new genetic syndrome caused by mutation of a single gene and named it CATIFA, an acronym for its core symptoms: cleft palate, cataracts, tooth abnormality, intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism and ADHD.
Atomic tuning on cobalt enables an eightfold increase of H2O2 production
IBS scientists and their colleagues have recently report an ultimate electrocatalyst that addresses all of the issues that trouble H2O2 production.
Knee replacement timing is all wrong for most patients
The timing of knee replacement surgery is critical to optimize its benefit.
A replacement for exercise?
Michigan Medicine researchers recently found that Sestrin, a naturally occurring protein in the body, mimicked the benefits of exercise in flies and mice.
McMaster chemists find new way to break down old tires into material for new ones
A team of chemists at McMaster University has discovered an innovative way to break down and dissolve the rubber used in automobile tires, a process which could lead to new recycling methods that have so far proven to be expensive, difficult and largely inefficient.
Investigation: Problems in clinical trial reporting continue amid lax federal enforcement
Companies, universities, and other institutions that conduct clinical trials are required to record the results of most of them in a federal database, so that doctors and patients can see whether new treatments are safe and effective.
A new approach to making airplane parts, minus the massive infrastructure
MIT engineers have developed a method to produce aerospace-grade composites without the enormous ovens and pressure vessels.
'Real' rape stereotype may affect child rape trials
New research has found that two factors -- an outdoor location and the presence of a weapon -- have a significant bearing on the verdict of juries in cases of child stranger rape.
Research identifies new route for tackling drug resistance in skin cancer cells
Researchers have found that melanoma cells fight anti-cancer drugs by changing their internal skeleton (cytoskeleton) -- opening up a new therapeutic route for combating skin and other cancers that develop resistance to treatment.
Israeli docs strike big blow to superbugs
In a study published in Science magazine, the researchers showed that aggressive bacteria can be controlled -- but only if doctors administer treatment within a short window of opportunity.
The advantage of changing sex in fish population recovery
Some fish species recover at different rates when fishing is eliminated inside MPAs.
Predicting non-native invasions in Antarctica
A new study identifies the non-native species most likely to invade the Antarctic Peninsula region over the next decade.
How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea
Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the sea.
Program proves effective in preventing dating violence with middle school students
Coaching Boys Into Men, a program that seeks to prevent dating violence and sexual assault, reduces abusive behaviors among middle school male athletes toward their female peers, according to clinical trial results published today in JAMA Pediatrics.
Study: 'Value instantiation' key to luxury brands' and social responsibility
Although luxury brands and social responsibility seem fundamentally inconsistent with each other, the two entities can coexist in the mind of the consumer, provided the brand can find someone -- typically, a celebrity -- who successfully embodies the two conflicting value sets, says new research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and James F.
Many rescue dog owners think they are imported (wrongly) into UK via Pet Travel Scheme
Many owners of rescue dogs imported into the UK believe they arrive through the European Union (EU) Pet Travel Scheme, which has less stringent requirements than the EU Balai Directive, which should be applied for these animals, find the results of a large survey, published in Vet Record.
Broad support needed to maximize impact of cars designed for kids with mobility issues
For families who use the modified ride-on cars to help young children with mobility issues develop self-guided exploration and socialization, researcher Sam Logan found that robust support is needed to ensure the cars actually get used, rather than being forgotten in a closet.
Collective leadership groups maintain cohesion and act decisively
Members of collective leadership groups can maintain cohesion and act decisively when faced with a crisis, in spite of lacking the formal authority to do so, according to new research from Cass Business School.
Future subtropical warming accelerates tropical climate change
In response to future fossil fuel burning, climate computer models simulate a pronounced warming in the tropical oceans.
A new old therapy
The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) 2019 'biggest threats' report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.
Directed evolution of endogenous genes opens door to rapid agronomic trait improvement
A research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have engineered five saturated targeted endogenous mutagenesis editors (STEMEs) and generated de novo mutations to facilitate the directed evolution of plant genes.
How do X-ray images helped reveal insects' physiological responses to gravity?
'We have multiple indicators pointing to the grasshoppers responding to its body orientation,' Socha said.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.