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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 21, 2020


Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses
A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
New image analysis method for time-lapse microscopy shows how giant viruses infect amoeba
Host cells infected with giant viruses behave in a unique manner.
Our biological clock plays crucial role in healing from surgery
If you have just had knee, shoulder or hip surgery, you may want to take anti-inflammatories in the morning or at noon, but not at night.
Emissions of potent greenhouse gas have grown, contradicting reports of huge reductions
Despite reports that global emissions of the potent greenhouse gas were almost eliminated in 2017, an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has found atmospheric levels growing at record values.
Link found between maternal depression and atopic dermatitis in children
A recent study suggests that maternal depression in the postpartum period, and even beyond, is associated with the development of atopic dermatitis throughout childhood and adolescence.
Cybercrime: Internet erodes teenage impulse controls
Many teenagers are struggling to control their impulses on the internet, in a scramble for quick thrills and a sense of power online, potentially increasing their risks of becoming cyber criminals.
IKBFU scientists developed capsule composition for enzyme against intellectual disability
Phenylpyrovirogradnaya oligophrenia is a disease that results in degradation of the amino acid called phenylalanine.
UMMS scientist shows gene therapy protection of eyesight in models of multiple sclerosis
Research from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reveals the molecular process in which synaptic connections in the brain are damaged in multiple sclerosis and how this contributes to neurodegenerative symptoms.
Kids rice snacks in Australia contain arsenic above EU guidelines: Study
Three out of four rice-based products tested have concentrations of arsenic that exceed the EU guideline for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers.
Advancing the application of genomic sequences through 'Kmasker plants'
The correct assembly of plant genomes can be hampered by a large amount of repetitive sequences.
Head collision rates at World Cups similar but women received more medical assessments
According to research published in JAMA, female and male soccer players had similar rates of head collision events during elite tournaments such as the World Cup but half of the female players involved received medical assessments, compared with only one third of the impacted male players.
A simple way to predict tropical cyclones undergoing rapid intensification
Scientsits propose a simple way to predict tropical cyclones undergoing rapid intensification.
The properties of thin titanium oxide films have been studied
Some titanium oxides are known for their unique properties, such as increased photocatalytic activity (i.e. they effectively use light to speed up chemical reactions).
Avatar worms help to identify factors that modify genetic diseases
C. elegans worms were genetically edited by CRISPR to introduce human mutations that cause retinitis pigmentaria.
New study highlights importance of grain foods in infant diets
Undertaken to inform the development of the first-ever Dietary Guidelines (2020-2025) to include specific recommendations for infants and toddlers, this study analyzed infant data from the 2001-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).
Dying people give last gift to help cure HIV
New year, new promise? Despite decades of research, scientists do not fully know all the places HIV hides in the human body.
The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Mental health problems persist in adolescents five years after bariatric surgery despite substantial weight loss
Five years after weight-loss surgery, despite small improvements in self-esteem and moderate improvements in binge eating, adolescents did not see improvements in their overall mental health, compared to peers who received conventional obesity treatment, according to a study in Sweden with 161 participants aged 13-18 years published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.
Scientists show we don't need horses to treat diphtheria
A project taking the first steps towards ending the use of horses to treat diphtheria has succeeded.
Fat cells can sense sunlight -- not getting enough increases metabolic syndrome risk
Fat cells beneath the skin can sense light, and they behave differently when exposed to light that mimics indoor lighting vs. natural sunlight.
Possible Alzheimer's breakthrough suggested
Researchers at the Case Western University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio say they have identified a previously unknown gene and associated protein (which they have named 'aggregatin') which could potentially be suppressed to slow the advance of Alzheimer's disease.
Possible Parkinson's treatment successfully targets two major nerve systems
Scientists have discovered that a non-invasive technique which could one day be used to treat Parkinson's disease, can successfully target a highly specific group of brain cells which play a key role in development of the condition.
University of Miami study explores cognitive function in people with mental illness
A study funded by the Veterans Administration and directed by researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has shown few differences in the profiles of genes that influence cognition between people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and the general population.
Global study finds predators are most likely to be lost when habitats are converted for human use
A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities.
Plants absorb lead from perovskite solar cells more than expected
Lead from metal-organic perovskite compounds can be absorbed particularly easily by plants.
New method to enable the production of cheaper, longer-lasting vaccines
A new method to produce vaccines that have a longer shelf-life, are cheaper and can be stored without the need for cooling is being presented in the open-access journal BMC Biotechnology.
Treatment for depression must also restore proper functioning of the blood-brain barrier
To better treat people with depression, not only must we treat the neurons affected by the disease, but we must also restore the integrity of the barrier that regulates exchanges between blood circulation and the brain.
New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones
Recent advances in computer graphics are making it possible to create computer-generated (CG) representations of human beings that are difficult to distinguish from their real-world counterparts.
Bend and snap: New interventions for rib fractures
As recently published in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, patients who underwent surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) for three or more rib fractures with partial dislocation reported less pain on the numeric pain scale and a better quality of life after their stabilization surgery.
Researchers identify a possible cause and treatment for inflammatory bowel disease
In a study published online in PNAS on Jan. 20, 2020, Prof.
Feeding the world without wrecking the planet is possible
A study led by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) now suggests a comprehensive solution package for feeding 10 billion people within our planet's environmental boundaries.
Scanning Raman picoscopy: A new methodology for determining molecular chemical structure
The strong spatial confinement of a plasmonic field at an atomically sharp tip has made it possible to visualize the inner structure of a single molecule and image its vibrational modes in real space.
New study reveals a life aquatic for many spider species
Researchers at the California Academy of Sciences and William Paterson University found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats.
Recreational marijuana availability in Oregon and use among adolescents
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation suggests that legalization and greater retail availability of recreational marijuana is positively associated with marijuana use among adolescents.
Cultural difference play crucial role in when people would sacrifice one to save group
Cultural differences play a pivotal role in how people in different parts of the world perceive when it is acceptable to sacrifice one person to save a larger group, new research has shown.
University of Barcelona study links weekend eating jet lag to obesity
A new study by the University of Barcelona (UB) concluded that irregularity in eating schedules during the weekend, named by the authors as eating jet lag, could be related to the increase of body mass index (BMI), a formula that measures weight and height to determine whether someone's weight is healthy.
Study finds flooding damage to levees is cumulative -- and often invisible
Recent research finds that repeated flooding events have a cumulative effect on the structural integrity of earthen levees, suggesting that the increase in extreme weather events associated with climate change could pose significant challenges for the nation's aging levee system.
Advanced polymers help streamline water purification, environmental remediation
It takes a lot of energy to collect, clean and dispose of contaminated water.
New roles found for Huntington's disease protein
A Duke University research team has identified a new function of a gene called huntingtin, a mutation of which underlies the progressive neurodegenerative disorder known as Huntington's Disease.
New study examines mortality costs of air pollution in US
Scholars from the Gies College of Business at Illinois studied the effects of acute fine particulate matter exposure on mortality, health care use and medical costs among older Americans through Medicare data and changes in local wind direction.
Recent health reforms in Oregon reduce infant deaths, improve access for women's health
Oregon's unique health care delivery system for low-income patients is resulting in fewer infant deaths, according to a recent study.
The little auks that lived in the Pacific
Findings from a 700,000-year-old fossil bone indicate that a close relative of the most abundant seabird species in the North Atlantic, the modern dovekie, or 'little auk,' used to thrive in the Pacific Ocean and Japan.
Women still face barriers to breastfeed at work
Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.
New study debunks notion that salt consumption contributes to weight loss
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that reducing sodium intake in adults with elevated blood pressure or hypertension decreased thirst, urine volume and blood pressure, but did not affect metabolic energy needs.
A model ecosystem fish story
Have I got a fish story for you. Any angler beginning a yarn like that usually ends up spinning a tall tale, an exaggeration or bald-faced lie.
Doubts raised about effectiveness of HPV vaccines
A new analysis of the clinical trials of HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer raises doubts about the vaccines' effectiveness.
Less may be more in next-gen batteries
Rice University engineers build full lithium-ion batteries with silicon anodes and an alumina layer to protect cathodes from degrading.
Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees
Researchers discover that neonicotinoid seed treatments are driving a dramatic increase in insecticide toxicity in U.S. agricultural landscapes, despite evidence that these treatments have little to no benefit in many crops.
Environmentally friendly shipping helps to reduce freight costs
The shipping sector has potential to gain profit by reducing carbon dioxide emissions.
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids.
Discovery of beneficial fungal taxa may help restore native plant in the PNW
Camas, a seed-producing forb, grows in prairie and wetland habitats in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and carries profound prehistoric and current significance as a food resource and article of commerce among indigenous cultures of the PNW.
Kirigami designs hold thousands of times their own weight
Researchers find a new set of geometric motifs that can create self-locking, lightweight, durable structures out of soft materials.
Improving cardiovascular health of the most vulnerable
A two-year pilot project led by Rick Stouffer, MD, shows how the cardiovascular health of the most vulnerable patients can be improved with free medications.
Study assesses absorption, blood levels of active ingredients in sunscreen
A randomized clinical trial with 48 healthy volunteers assessed the absorption of six active ingredients (avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene, homosalate, octisalate and octinoxate) in four sunscreen products formulated as lotion and sprays (aerosol, nonaerosol and pump).
Immune cell health discovery could optimise cancer therapies
Scientists at UCL have discovered how immune cells, essential for tackling life-threatening infections and cancers, are able to 'recycle' material within themselves in order to stay healthy and function, a breakthrough finding which could lead to more effective immunotherapies.
Zebrafish teach researchers more about atrial fibrillation
Genetic research in zebrafish at the University of Copenhagen has surprised the researchers behind the study.
Mixing the unmixable -- a novel approach for efficiently fusing different polymers
Cross-linked polymers are structures where large molecular chains are linked together, allowing exceptional mechanical properties and chemical resistance to the final product.
Corals' partnership with microalgae helps in stressful times but there's a trade-off
In the warmer and brighter shallow waters of Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu Hawaiian rice coral host more heat-tolerant microbes in their tissues compared to rice coral communities in cooler and darker deep waters, according to research published recently by scientists at the University of Hawai'i.
Kazan University chemists teach neural networks to predict properties of compounds
The international team works on a computational model able to predict the properties of new molecules based on the analysis of fundamental chemical laws.
Vitamin D supplementation linked to potential improvements in blood pressure in children
Overweight and obese vitamin D-deficient children who took a relatively high dose of vitamin D every day for six months had lower blood pressure and improved insulin sensitivity than their peers who took a lower dose.
Researcher discovers previously rejected function in the brain's blood vessels
Contrary to previous belief, a neuroscientist from the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences has shown the existence of a particular type of sphincter in the brain's blood supply in mice.
Let the europium shine brighter
A stacked nanocarbon antenna makes a rare earth element shine 5 times more brightly than previous designs, with applications in molecular light-emitting devices.
TB bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil
Scientists from the University of Surrey and University of Geneva have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung.
Cyberbullying Linked to Increased Depression and PTSD
Cyberbullying had the impact of amplifying symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people who were inpatients at an adolescent psychiatric hospital, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.
New policy reduces anti-psychotic medications in foster children
Rutgers researchers have found that a Texas strategy to reduce anti-psychotic medication for children can serve as a model for other state Medicaid programs.
Banning food waste: Lessons for rural America
Effective July 1, 2020, Vermont will be the first state in the nation to ban all household food waste from landfills statewide.
'Love hormone' improves attachment issues in people with autism
Oxytocin, often dubbed the 'love hormone', is known to promote social bonding.
Select few cancer patients enroll in potentially life-extending clinical trials
Patient enrollment in clinical trials as the first course of treatment after cancer diagnosis is low, despite the fact that enrollment may increase life expectancy, according to researchers at Penn State.
Entrepreneurs have different storytelling styles for presenting business
New pioneering research shows that entrepreneurs communicate to strengthen their professional image and stakeholder relationships -- and avoid blaming others.
New opportunity for cancer drug development
After years of research on cell surface receptors called Frizzleds, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden provide the proof-of-principle that these receptors are druggable by small molecules.
Certain liver cells may help prevent organ rejection after transplant, study finds
Mesenchymal stromal cells from fat tissue and bone marrow are widely used in therapeutic trials for their anti-inflammatory qualities, but new Mayo Clinic research finds that liver cells may be of greater value.
Coral 'helper' stays robust under ocean acidification
A type of algae crucial to the survival of coral reefs may be able to resist the impacts of ocean acidification caused by climate change.
Designer-defect clamping of ferroelectric domain walls for more-stable nanoelectronics
Engineered defects in ferroelectric materials provides key to improved polarisation stability, a significant step forward for domain-wall nanoelectronics in data storage.
Esports organisations look to optimise player sleep
A study has used sleep tracking devices and mood measures (anxiety and depression) to determine how well esports athletes around the world sleep, and the effect this has on their mental health and well being.
Antiviral compound offers hope against deadly flu
A study in mice finds that a compound modeled on a protein found in bananas safely protects against multiple strains of the influenza virus, Ebola and coronaviruses.
Determining the atomic structure of natural products more rapidly and accurately
Many drugs are derived from natural products. But before natural products can be exploited, chemists must first determine their structure and stereochemistry.
Taming electrons with bacteria parts
In a new study, scientists at the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory report a new synthetic system that could guide electron transfer over long distances.
Light-up wheels: Unique organic light-emitting molecular emitters
Researchers at Osaka University synthesized novel OLEDs based on efficient ring-shaped molecular macrocycles.
Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people -- and now scientists know why
Despite their reputation as blood-suckers, mosquitoes actually spent most of their time drinking nectar from flowers.
Study: Pharmaceutical companies marketing stimulants to physicians
Results of a new study show that a large number of physicians in the US may have received marketing payments from pharmaceutical companies that produce stimulant medications.
'Ancient' cellular discovery key to new cancer therapies
Australian researchers have uncovered a metabolic system which could lead to new strategies for therapeutic cancer treatment.
New glaucoma test to help prevent blindness
Researchers have identified 107 genes that increase a person's risk of developing the eye disease glaucoma, and now developed a genetic test to detect those at risk of going blind from it.
Police shootings linked to inaccurate dispatch information
306 law enforcement officers from 18 agencies were involved in a simulation examining impact of dispatch information on an officer's decision to fire their weapon.
Persistent environmental contaminant changes the gut microbiome of mice
An industrial chemical -- phased out since 2002, but previously used in stain and water-repellent products and firefighting foam -- alters the gut microbiome of mice and could have implications for human health, according to an international team of researchers.
New self-assembled monolayer is resistant to air
Organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been around for over forty years.
The adaptability of debris is successfully proven as a raw material for roads
A research project at the University of Cordoba (Spain) studied the behavior of a highway made from recycled materials in situ from nearby demolished homes for 10 years.
Maternal depression on rise in poor countries
Women in low and medium-income countries struggle with many health issues in pregnancy and childbirth, but little attention is given to antenatal depression -- which is on the rise in many developing countries, new PLOS ONE paper shows.
Low power metal detector senses magnetic fingerprints
Recent studies have shown metallic objects have their own magnetic fingerprints based on size, shape and physical composition.
Blue light triggers memory and emphatic fear in mice via a non-invasive approach
IBS researchers have engineered an improved biological tool that controls calcium (Ca2+) levels in the brain via blue light.
Drug profiling and gene scissors open new avenues in immunotherapy
Researchers have discovered ways to boost CAR T-cell therapy.
Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away
A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern US traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.
News aggregator websites play critical role in driving readers to media outlet websites
News aggregators help to simplify consumers' search for news stories by gathering content based on viewing history or other factors.
Modified plants to curb climate change
New technologies are needed to combat climate change. Now bioinformatics specialists from Würzburg might have found a way of enabling plants to store more carbon dioxide.
Examining low-carbohydrate, low-fat diets, risk of death
An analysis of self-reported national dietary data from more than 37,000 US adults suggests associations between low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets and the risk of death may depend on the quality and food sources of the carbohydrates, proteins and fats people eat.
Changing cancer care, one organoid at a time
A patient-specific tumor organoid platform developed by Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers and their cancer center colleagues could someday take the guessing game out of immunotherapy treatments.
How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters
Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a study published today in eLife.
Glutamate in the brain has unexpected qualities, researchers show with new analysis method
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and Gothenburg University in Sweden have achieved something long thought almost impossible -- counting the molecules of the neurotransmitter glutamate released when a signal is transferred between two brain cells.
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
Researchers (UNIGE) have identified the SLC6A6 gene, which encodes taurine.
Sustainable markets must be created and defended
Creating sustainable markets poses particular obstacles: a sustainable market must be continuously shaped and reshaped.
Groups publish statements on CT contrast use in patients with kidney disease
The risk of administering modern intravenous iodinated contrast media in patients with reduced kidney function has been overstated, according to new consensus statements from the American College of Radiology and the National Kidney Foundation.
To reverse engineer dynamics of microbial communities, researchers construct their own
Scientific and public appreciation for microbes -- and the key role their communal actions play in environmental health, food production, and human wellness -- has grown in recent years.
Drug combo reverses arthritis in rats
Salk researchers have discovered that a powerful combination of 2 experimental drugs reverses the cellular and molecular signs of osteoarthritis in rats as well as in isolated human cartilage cells.
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia.
New technique to study molecules and materials on quantum simulator discovered
A new technique to study the properties of molecules and materials on a quantum simulator has been discovered.
Traumatic brain injury impairs hormone production, disrupting sleep, cognition, memory
The team has learned more about how a TBI triggers a reduction in growth hormone secretion and why most TBI patients improve after growth hormone replacement treatment.
Montana State astrophysicist finds massive black holes wandering around dwarf galaxies
A new search led by MSU astrophysicist Amy Reines has revealed more than a dozen massive black holes in dwarf galaxies that were previously considered too small to host them, surprising scientists with their location within the galaxies.
Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion.
Mars' water was mineral-rich and salty
Presently, many scientists believe Mars is the best candidate in the search for life beyond Earth because it is relatively nearby and there is good evidence that liquid water flowed on Mars' surface billions of years ago.
Researchers solve protein structures to fight asthma
Biophysicists shed light on the structure and functioning mechanism of the CysLT receptors, which regulate inflammatory responses associated with allergic disorders.
Engagement and education key to changing attitudes towards virginity testing
Virginity testing is a complex, culturally mediated practice that is poorly understood by Western clinicians.
Influenza vaccination of children cuts hospitalization in half: Ben-Gurion U. researchers
The findings reveal that the flu vaccine reduced hospitalizations associated with the flu by more than half.
Study provides the first data on concussion risk in youth football
'These are the first biomechanical data characterizing concussion risk in kids,' said Steve Rowson, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the director of the Virginia Tech Helmet Lab.
New AGA guideline outlines treatment best practices for ulcerative colitis patients
An increasing number of drugs are available for long-term management of moderate to severe UC, leading to questions about treatment strategies for optimal patient care.
Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena
Caltech's Lihong Wang has adapted his picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves.
New tool assesses risk of depression in adolescence
A study involving researchers from King's College London, has developed a predictive tool that can recognize adolescents who are at high or low risk of depression in young adulthood.
Addressing global warming with new nanoparticles and sunshine
Harvesting sunlight, IBS scientists reported a new strategy to transform carbon dioxide (CO2) into oxygen (O2) and pure carbon monoxide (CO) without side-products in water.
Opioid prescriptions affected by computer settings
Researchers found that when default settings, showing a preset number of opioid pills, were modified downward, physicians prescribed fewer pills.
First detailed electronic study of new nickelate superconductor finds 3D metallic state
Unlike cuprates -- the first known class of unconventional superconductors -- the new nickelates are inherently metallic, sharing electrons with intervening layers of rare earth material to create a 3D metallic state.
Study verifies a missing piece to urban air quality puzzle
Air quality models have long failed to accurately predict atmospheric levels of secondary organic aerosol, which comprises a substantial fraction of the fine particulate matter in cities.
Vitamin C-B1-steroid combo linked to lower septic shock mortality in kids
Treating septic shock in children with a combination of intravenous vitamin C, vitamin B1 and hydrocortisone (a commonly used steroid) is associated with lower mortality, according to a study from Ann & Robert H.
Preparing land for palm oil causes most climate damage
New research has found preparing land for palm oil plantations and the growth of young plants causes significantly more damage to the environment, emitting double the amount of greenhouse gases than mature plantations.
Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'
Arctic sea ice cannot 'quickly bounce back' if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests.
Platypus on brink of extinction
New UNSW research calls for national action to minimise the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.
Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons
Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new CU Boulder-led study.
Visits to pediatricians on the decline
Commercially insured children in the US are seeing pediatricians less often than they did a decade ago, according to a new analysis led by a pediatrician-scientist at the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh.
Autism study finds later diagnoses for girls, high rates of co-occurring disorders
A study analyzing the first 1,000 patients from the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment found that girls receive autism diagnoses an average of 1.5 years later than boys, and people with autism often have co-occurring medical and psychiatric conditions.
Gut bacteria may be one culprit for increase of colorectal cancer in younger people
A bacteria typically linked to periodontal disease, Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.
Opioid addiction treatment is increasing, except in the young
National statistics on medication treatment for opioid addiction show that buprenorphrine use is increasing in all age groups except the young.
Cell biology: All in a flash!
Scientists of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed a tool to eliminate essential proteins from cells with a flash of light.

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