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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 22, 2020


Mushrooms are older than we thought
According to a new study led by Steeve Bonneville from the Université libre de Bruxelles, the first mushrooms were already present on Earth between 715 and 810 million years ago, 300 million years earlier than the scientific community had believed until now.
Physicists trap light in nanoresonators for record time
An international team of Russian, Australian and Korean researchers have experimentally trapped an electromagnetic wave in a gallium arsenide nanoresonator for a record-breaking time, over 200 periods of one wave oscillation.
Old molecule, new tricks
Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel.
Researchers brew a formula for consistent espresso and industry savings
Espresso delivers a desired jolt of caffeine but getting a consistent good-taste is difficult.
E-cigarette popularity on Instagram is still growing despite an FDA anti-vaping campaign
Despite a recent FDA awareness campaign about the hazards of vaping, promotional Instagram posts are 10,000-fold more prevalent than the FDA's #TheRealCost hashtag, shows a recent study.
Tiny price gaps cost investors billions
New research shows that, millions of times each day, investors in the US stock market see different prices at the same moment -- and that these differing prices cost investors at least $2 billion dollars each year.
Traces of the European enlightenment found in the DNA of western sign languages
Sign languages throughout North and South America and Europe have centuries-long roots in five European locations, a finding that gives new insight into the influence of the European Enlightenment on many of the world's signing communities and the evolution of their languages.
First ancient DNA from West/Central Africa illuminates deep human past
An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.
What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.
Study uncovers unexpected connection between gliomas, neurodegenerative diseases
New basic science and clinical research identifies TAU, the same protein studied in the development of Alzheimer's, as a biomarker for glioma development.
In animal models, a 'shocking' step toward a potential HIV cure
Yerkes and UNC researchers report sustained latency reversal in two animal models of HIV infection.
Physicist obtain atomically thin molybdenum disulfide films on large-area substrates
Researchers have managed to grow atomically thin films of molybdenum disulfide spanning up to several tens of square centimeters.
Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide
Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization.
Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.
Sticky antibiotic provides glue for successful treatment
Researchers have found how an antibiotic used to treat a debilitating gut infection stays put inside the body giving it time to effectively treat the problem, a discovery that will pave the way for the development of more effective antibiotic treatments to fight superbugs.
The color of your clothing can impact wildlife
Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a study conducted by a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Self-moisturising smart contact lenses
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes.
Policymakers join experts at the European Parliament for radioligand therapy report launch
Ahead of the European Commission's official launch of 'Europe's Beating Cancer Plan', The Health Policy Partnership and an expert-led steering committee met at the European Parliament in Brussels today to launch a new report, Radioligand therapy: realising the potential of targeted cancer care.
Decline in late stage cancer diagnoses after health reform law
Advanced stage cancer diagnoses declined following health insurance expansion in Massachusetts, likely due to increased access to screening and diagnostic services that identified cancers earlier, according to new research led by health economists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.
Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot
Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded.
Biologists recommend urgent action to protect California spotted owls
In the Pacific Northwest, the range expansion of barred owls has contributed to a conservation crisis for northern spotted owls, which are being displaced from their habitat.
Antiviral treatments inspire researchers to develop a new kind of cancer drug
An effort to thwart viral diseases like hepatitis or the common cold led to a new collaboration and a novel class of cancer drugs that appears effective in mice.
New tool for investigating brain cells, Parkinson's, and more
Researchers have created a new chemical tool for revealing how specific types of brain cell receptors function in the brain.
New groundbreaking method could improve the accuracy of data used to produce lifesaving drugs
A new high-throughput method has revealed metals previously undetected in 3D protein structures.
Scientists isolate biomarkers that can identify delirium risk and severity
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers associated with both delirium duration and severity in critically ill patients.
Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests
Stanford researchers predict that climate change will reduce the diversity of symbiotic fungi that help trees grow.
New survey results reveal the experts and public's attitude towards gene-edited crops
To understand the attitudinal difference among experts and public towards gene-edited crops, a team of Japanese researchers, led by Dr.
Adults with pain at greater risk for cannabis use disorder, finds study
A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons found that non-medical cannabis use -- including frequent or problematic use -- is significantly more common in adults with pain than in those without pain.
Study examines a new model for older adult wellness
Community-based wellness instructors can provide tailored wellness care to older adults, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
Synthetic nerve conduit bridges the gap in arm nerve repair
A team of scientists has created a biodegradable, synthetic conduit that repairs large gaps in injured nerves, which supported recovery and accelerated neuronal healing in a macaque model.
The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed
Hyung Joon Cha and his research team identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion.
Program reduces narcotic prescriptions after surgery with over-the-counter pain medicine
Surgeons at Houston Methodist Hospital are stemming the tide of addiction to prescription opioids by managing patients' pain after surgery.
Community-based counselors help mitigate grief among children orphaned in East Africa
A first-of-its-kind clinical trial involving more than 600 children in Kenya and Tanzania, in which community members were trained to deliver mental health treatment, showed improvement in participants' trauma-related symptoms up to a year after receiving therapy.
Blood tests can predict timing of final menstrual period
Blood tests could replace menstrual periods as a gauge for when a women is nearing menopause, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
Acousto-optic modulation of photonic bound state in the continuum
Applying bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic integrated circuits enables low-loss light guidance and routing in low-refractive-index waveguides on high-refractive-index substrates.
Sustainability strategies more successful when managers believe in them
New research from Cass Business School has found that business sustainability strategies can succeed alongside mainstream competitive strategies when managers believe in them.
NIH-supported scientists reverse HIV and SIV latency in two animal models
In a range of experiments, scientists have reactivated resting immune cells that were latently infected with HIV or its monkey relative, SIV, in cells in the bloodstream and a variety of tissues in animals.
The Lancet Global Health: Guided self-help intervention reduces refugees' psychological distress and improves wellbeing in humanitarian crises
A guided self-help approach that provides strategies for managing distress and coping with adversity is safe, and resulted in meaningful improvements in psychological distress and functioning compared to enhanced usual care over three months in female refugees living in a settlement in Uganda, according to a randomized trial involving almost 700 South Sudanese refugee women, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
Helping roadside soils bounce back after construction
Research shows tillage and vegetation can help alleviate compaction.
Reducing dangerous swelling in traumatic brain injury
After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most harmful damage is caused by secondary swelling of the brain compressed inside the skull.
Breastfeeding and childbearing linked to lower early menopause risk
Results of a new epidemiological analysis of more than 108,000 women observed a lower risk of early menopause among women who had at least one pregnancy lasting at least six months and among those who had breastfed their infants.
Signals from inside the Earth: Borexino experiment releases new data on geoneutrinos
The Borexino collaboration has presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth.
Study reveals 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions in 8th-century BCE Samaria
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that only 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions on an 8th-century BCE Samarian ostraca.
Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time?
Integrate micro chips for electronic skin
Researchers from Dresden and Osaka present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.
A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop
Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia.
Solving a biological puzzle: How stress causes gray hair
Harvard scientists have found evidence to support long-standing anecdotes that stress causes hair graying.
Researchers trace Coronavirus outbreak in China to snakes
Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks.
Ben-Gurion University researchers slash pre-drug screening time from years to days
'Our new approach will increase the understanding of the mechanisms and evolutionary origins of specific PPIs, and facilitate the rational design of specific inhibitors that can discriminate between structurally similar protein targets,' says Professor Niv Papo of BGU's Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev (NIBN).
Both simple and advanced imaging can predict best stroke patients for thrombectomy
Both simple and advanced computed tomography (CT) were effective in accurately predicting which stroke patients would benefit from endovascular thrombectomy to remove a large cerebral clot, but together they were even better, reported researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth in Houston.
Genetic identification of human remains from the Spanish Civil War and the dictatorship
The BIOMICs Research Team at the UPV/EHU have published the results of analyses which have enabled the genetic identification of 525 human remains recovered from different mass graves dating from the Spanish Civil War and the subsequent dictatorship.
Performance and age only partially explain gender pay gap for New Zealand researchers
Over her lifetime, the average female scientific researcher at a New Zealand university earns about NZ$400,000 less than her male counterparts, and less than half of this disparity can be explained by research performance and age.
3,000-year-old teeth solve Pacific banana mystery
Humans began transporting and growing banana in Vanuatu 3,000 years ago, a University of Otago scientist has discovered.
Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?
The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere.
Kids born to moms with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia at greater risk for obesity
A study in Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics found that when a mother experiences both gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, her child has a growth trajectory that leads to an increased risk of high childhood BMI over time.
Montana State researcher harnesses microorganisms to make living building materials
Chelsea Heveran, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, is the lead author of a new study showing that certain bacteria can be used to create an easily recyclable, concrete-like substance.
Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve
Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area.
Rising global temperatures turn northern permafrost region into significant carbon source
A new study that incorporates datasets gathered from more than 100 sites by institutions including the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, suggests that decomposition of organic matter in permafrost soil is substantially larger than previously thought, demonstrating the significant impact that emissions from the permafrost soil could have on the greenhouse effect and global warming.
Nature study: First ancient DNA from West Africa illuminates the deep human past
The research team sequenced DNA from four children buried 8,000 and 3,000 years ago at Shum Laka in Cameroon, a site excavated by a Belgian and Cameroonian team 30 years ago.
Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO).
Full influenza vaccination among children cuts hospitalization in half
Fully vaccinating children reduces the risk of hospitalization associated with influenza by 54%, according to a study by researchers at the University of Michigan, the Clalit Research Institute, and Ben-Gurion University in Israel.
PET/MRI identifies notable breast cancer imaging biomarkers
Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
Mapping the path of climate change
Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states.
Light at the end of the tunnel for most individuals with low-vision
Progress in research and technology is giving rise to an optimistic future for compensation and restoration of low vision, according to research in a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, published by IOS Press.
Spikes in blood pressure among young adults spell trouble in mid-age
Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease by middle age, a new analysis led by Duke Health researchers shows.
Earthquake catalog shows complex rupturing during 2019 ridgecrest sequence
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence.
Scientific evidence found for role of stress in hair whitening
Partnering with scientists at Harvard, a group of Brazilians affiliated with the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID), supported by FAPESP, described the mechanisms that cause hair color loss in extreme situations.
Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right.
Hope for patients with a rare genetic condition linked to severe infections
A research team sheds light on the mechanisms underlying chronic granulomatous disease.
Potential way to halt blinding macular degeneration identified
It would be the first treatment for dry age-related macular degeneration and could significantly improve treatment for wet AMD.
Scientists take the first step towards extending the Standard Model in physics
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and a number of German scientific organizations, calculated previously unexplored effects in atoms.
Ghostly particles detected in condensates of light and matter
Discover 'ghostly' particles and quantum depletion. FLEET study led by researchers at the Australian National University makes the first observation of 'ghost particles' from Bose-Einstein condensates via 'quantum depletion': particles expelled by interaction-induced quantum fluctuations.
Residues in fingerprints hold clues to their age
Police have long relied on the unique whorls, loops or arches encoded in fingerprints to identify suspects.
Life's Frankenstein beginnings
When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive.
FSU Research: Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit
Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to Florida State University researchers.
Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream
A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research from the University of Leeds.
Status report: OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale
OSIRIS-REx successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities.
Researchers reverse HIV latency, important scientific step toward cure
Overcoming HIV latency -- induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body - is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV.
Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth
The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation.
Researchers regrow damaged nerves with polymer and protein
University of Pittsburgh researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide -- a polymer tube -- filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need for transplanting stem cells or a donor nerve.
Industry funding of patient groups lacks governance and transparency
Industry funding of patient groups is common in many high income countries, but few patient groups have formal policies that govern corporate funding and financial transparency is inadequate, warn experts in The BMJ today.
Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan.
Sustainability claims about rubber don't stick
Companies work hard to present an environmentally responsible image. How well do these claims stack up?
Depression common during perimenopause but not regularly assessed by providers
Almost 40% of women experience symptoms of depression during perimenopause, yet it often goes undetected and untreated because many healthcare providers aren't screening for it and aren't prepared with treatment options.
Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems
Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
Anthropologists confirm existence of specialized sheep-hunting camp in prehistoric Lebanon
Anthropologists at the University of Toronto have confirmed the existence more than 10,000 years ago of a hunting camp in the mountains along the modern-day border between Lebanon and Syria -- one that straddles the period marking the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural settlements at the onset of the last stone age.
Study highlights effectiveness of behavioral interventions in conflict-affected regions
A new study, published in The Lancet Global Health, highlights the effectiveness of behavioral intervention in reducing psychological distress in conflict-affected regions.
Is it time to stop ringing the cancer bell?
A study published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics finds that patients who celebrate the end of cancer treatment by ringing a bell report more distressful memories of treatment than those who finish without ringing a bell.
Urine reuse as fertilizer is not likely to transfer antibiotic resistance
Urine is a goldmine of useful substances that can be captured and converted into products such as fertilizer.
2019's new medicines
With 48 drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 2019 was another highly productive year for the pharmaceutical industry.
Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria
New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.
Study results will inform immunization programs globally
The results of the B Part of It study -- the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted -- are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
New SwRI models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon
A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor.
A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA
The key of the extraordinary functionality of ribonucleic acid, better known as RNA, is a highly flexible and dynamic structure.
How're your cells' motors running?
Kyoto University researchers develop a device that parks individual molecular motors on nano scale platforms and found that two types of 'kinesin' possess different properties of coordination.
Pitt researchers propose solutions for networking lag in massive IoT devices
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have proposed a system that would use currently underutilized resources in an existing wireless channel to create extra opportunities for lag-free connections.
Locomotor engine in the spinal cord revealed
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have revealed a new principle of organization which explains how locomotion is coordinated in vertebrates akin to an engine with three gears.
Study provides insight into 'rapport-building' during victim interviews
A University of Liverpool research paper, published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, provides details of the approaches needed to help build rapport with victims of crime during interviews.
Controlled-release opioid may be leading to heart infections in persons who inject drugs
A new study from ICES, Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that injection drug users prescribed controlled-release hydromorphone are three times more likely to develop endocarditis, a serious bacterial heart infection, when compared to those prescribed other opioids.
Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive
Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide.
New research finds Earth's oldest asteroid strike linked to 'big thaw'
Curtin University scientists have discovered Earth's oldest asteroid strike occurred at Yarrabubba, in outback Western Australia, and coincided with the end of a global deep freeze known as a Snowball Earth.
Domesticated wheat has complex parentage
Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent.
Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles, but does not provide full protection
Adults who are exposed to a child with chickenpox (varicella) in the home are around 30% less likely to develop shingles (herpes zoster) over 20 years, finds a study in The BMJ today.
Poor mental health 'both cause and effect' of school exclusion
Children with mental health needs require urgent support from primary school onwards to avoid exclusion, which can be both cause and effect of poor mental health, new research concludes.
Study shines light on spread of Candida auris
Candida auris is capable of forming high burden biofilms, which may help explain why this fungal pathogen is spreading in hospitals worldwide, according to a study published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations
To better understand the broad demographic history of pre-Hispanic Mexico and to search for signatures of adaptive evolution, scientists have sequenced the complete protein-coding regions of the genome, or exomes, of 78 individuals from five different indigenous groups from Northern (Rara?muri or Tarahumara, and Huichol), Central (Nahua), South (Triqui, or TRQ) and Southeast (Maya, or MYA) Mexico.
A roadmap for adding ivermectin to the malaria toolbox
A group of experts led by Regina Rabinovich and Carlos Chaccour from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has published a roadmap to evaluate -- and subsequently implement -- ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool against malaria.
What it's like to live without a sense of smell
New research from the University of East Anglia (UK) reveals the impact of smell loss.
Late Neolithic Italy was home to complex networks of metal exchange
During the 4th and 3rd millennia BC, Italy was home to complex networks of metalwork exchange, according to a study published Jan.
How to keep boron inside cells during radiotherapy: a novel approach to cancer treatment
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique in which p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is transferred to cancer cells, and the boron in it undergoes nuclear fission reaction upon irradiation of thermal neutrons, releasing high energy particles that kill the cells.
Male fertility after chemotherapy: New questions raised
Professor Delbès, who specializes in reproductive toxicology, conducted a pilot study in collaboration with oncologists and fertility specialists from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) on a cohort of 13 patients, all survivors of pediatric leukemia and lymphoma.
Hopkins news: Climate change could unlock new microbes and increase heat-related deaths
The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published 'Viewpoint' articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans' ability to regulate body temperature.
Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland
New study is the first to use machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise.
Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression
A group of scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality.
Medicare may overpay for many surgical procedures
For most surgical procedures, Medicare provides physicians a single bundled payment that covers both the procedure and related postoperative care over a period of up to 90 days.
Are BMD and CT-FEA effective surrogate markers of femoral bone strength?
An International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) position paper reviews experimental and clinical evidence showing that hip bone strength estimated by bone mineral density (BMD) and/or finite element analysis (FEA) reflects the actual strength of the proximal femur.
New study provides insights for detecting the invasive brown treesnake
Visual surveys alone cannot sufficiently detect the Brown Treesnake (BTS), which was introduced to the island of Guam around the time of WWII and has contributed to significant biodiversity loss.
Texas A&M engineers develop recipe to dramatically strengthen body armor
Researchers at Texas A&M University have formulated a new recipe that can prevent weaknesses in modern-day armor.
Climate-friendly food choices protect the planet, promote health, reduce health costs
Increased uptake of plant-based diets in New Zealand could substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions while greatly improving population health and saving the healthcare system billions of dollars in the coming decades, according to a new University of Otago study.
Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally
In Nature, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup.
Fighting microbes with microbes
Researchers studying the effects associated to the consumption of antibiotics discover a bacterium that has a super protective effect, able to reduce the risk of acquiring infections.
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same.
Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 tossup
It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research from Stevens Institute of Technology.

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