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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 27, 2020


New study highlights prevalence of PTSD among obstetricians and gynaecologists
A new University of Liverpool led study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology today (Tuesday, 28 January 2020), has revealed the prevalence of work-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among obstetricians and gynaecologists.
New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment
Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms - too tiny to be seen by the naked eye - and their response to threats to their ecosystems.
An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease
The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine.
Ecofriendly catalyst for converting methane into useful gases using light instead of heat
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), National Institute for Materials Science, Kochi University of Technology, Shizuoka University, and Kyushu University developed a catalyst to convert abundant methane gas into more useful synthesis gas.
Physicists develop a new experimental model for 'lipid rafts' in human cells
Lipid Raft describes sections of a cell membrane that are responsible for signaling and molecular exchange.
Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks
Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away -- from the inside out -- portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.
Study reveals similar survival of African-American and white men with prostate cancer in an equal-access health care system
Among men with prostate cancer who received care from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health System, an equal-access health care system, African-American men did not have more advanced disease at the time of diagnosis or die earlier than white men, unlike trends seen in the greater US population of patients with prostate cancer.
Burden of health care costs greatest among low-income Americans
Health care costs have been steadily rising, but how a great a burden that places on American housholds is difficult for both the public and industry experts to fully calculate.
Science at the interface: Bioinspired materials reveal useful properties
In a new study, researchers at ASU's Biodesign Institute and their colleagues explore new materials with physical properties that can be custom-tailored to suit particular needs.
A new model has been developed that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes
A team of physicists has designed an experiment that simulates the formation of a new type of lipid raft on a nanometric scale.
New aspects of globular glial tauopathy could help in the design of more effective drugs
This study, led by Dr. Isidre Ferrer, has described that protein inclusions that damage neurons and glial cells are responsible for the pathology showed by globular glial tauopathy patients.
Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer
Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer by one-third, according to an analysis of all relevant published studies.
'Cinderella subject' of Sport & Exercise Science vital to keeping Wales healthy & wealthy
Sport and Exercise Science has been described as the 'Cinderella' subject of Wales and a key part of the Welsh economy, according to new labour market data being released at an event in the Assembly tomorrow (Tuesday).
AI to help monitor behavior
Algorithms based on artificial intelligence do better at supporting educational and clinical decision-making, according to a new study.
Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses
Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.
An old plant virus inspires the design of a modern vaccine to fight against malaria
WRAIR scientists demonstrated that a novel, second-generation malaria vaccine candidate based on the tobacco mosaic virus may offer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.
Climate costs smallest if warming is limited to 2°C
Using computer simulations of a model by US Nobel Laureate William Nordhaus, they weight climate damages from, for instance, increasing weather extremes or decreasing labor productivity against the costs of cutting greenhouse gas emission by phasing out coal and oil.
Successfully predicting bone marrow failure caused by drugs, radiation, and disease
A new human Bone Marrow Chip that more closely recapitulates drug- and radiation-induced responses observed in patients (e.g., as a result of cancer treatments), and was used to uncover a previously unknown abnormality in the bone marrow of patients with a rare genetic disorder, and sets the stage for better toxicology studies and personalized medicine.
How personality predicts seeing others as sex objects
Several personality traits related to psychopathy -- especially being openly antagonistic -- predict a tendency to view others as merely sex objects, finds a study by psychologists at Emory University.
'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces
One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers -- something that most other insects cannot do -- signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together.
Enhancing drug testing with human body-on-chip systems
Scientists at Tel Aviv University and Harvard University have devised a functioning comprehensive multi-Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) platform that enables effective preclinical drug testing of human drug pharmacology.
Effects of contact between minority and majority groups more complex than once believed
For more than 50 years, social scientists and practitioners have suggested that having members of different groups interact with each other can be an effective tool for reducing prejudice.
Unique centromere type discovered in the European dodder
Commonly, the presence of histone variant CENH3 epigenetically determines the positioning of centromeres.
Discovery could lead to new treatment for rare blood disease
A new study shows cancer cells found in the lesions on the skin of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients originate from the blood, not the skin as was believed.
A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds
Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning.
Study examines prostate cancer treatment decisions
A five-year follow-up study of more than 2,000 US men who received prostate cancer treatment is creating a road map for future patients regarding long-term bowel, bladder and sexual function in order to clarify expectations and enable men to make informed choices about care.
White lupin: The genome of this legume has finally been sequenced
White lupin is a particularly abstemious crop, requiring very little fertiliser and producing high-protein seeds of great nutritive quality.
The great e-scooter hack
New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions.
Strict adherence to traditional masculinity associated with more severe PTSD in vets
To help service members perform better in the field, military training emphasizes the importance of certain traits associated with traditional masculinity, including suppression of emotion and self-reliance.
Political Islamophobia may look differently online than in person
Islamophobia was rampant on social media during the midterm elections, but researchers say future Muslim candidates running for office should know that the hatred they see online may be different than what they experience on the campaign trail.
Study urges national review of support services for male survivors of sexual violence
A call for a complete review of national support services for male survivors of sexual violence and abuse has been made following a study by Lancaster University, launched today.
A sustainable alternative to crude oil
A research team from the Fraunhofer Society and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Volker Sieber has developed a new polyamide family which can be produced from a byproduct of cellulose production -- a successful example for a more sustainable economy with bio-based materials.
Most young people do not vape, and even fewer vape regularly
While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don't vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.
Switching grape varieties can help save world's wine-growing regions: UBC study
Hotter temperatures threaten global wine production, with multiple studies now forecasting that more than half of regions suitable to planting wine grapes could be lost to climate change.
NHS staff shortages mean patients miss out on early bowel cancer diagnosis
Around 1,100 people in England could miss out on the chance of an early stage bowel cancer diagnosis through screening each year because of NHS staff shortages, according to new calculations released by Cancer Research UK.
New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma
Large holes in our cells have been implicated in depression, Alzehimer's disease, asthma, and even taste.
New study debunks myth of Cahokia's Native American lost civilization
A UC Berkeley archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America's most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis.
'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace
The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries.
Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed
Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists from the University of Bristol have been tracking patterns of mass loss from Pine Island -- Antarctica's largest glacier.
UCI oceanographers predict increase in phytoplankton by 2100
A neural network-driven Earth system model has led University of California, Irvine oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century.
Rural kids carrying handguns is 'not uncommon' and starts as early as sixth grade
Roughly one-third of young males and 1 in 10 females in rural communities have carried a handgun, reports a new University of Washington study.
Method detects defects in 2D materials for future electronics, sensors
To further shrink electronic devices and to lower energy consumption, the semiconductor industry is interested in using 2D materials, but manufacturers need a quick and accurate method for detecting defects in these materials to determine if the material is suitable for device manufacture.
Research leads to life changing improvement for some people living with depression
UCalgary researchers have completed a study investigating the effects of two different methods of deep brain stimulation (DBS), short pulse and long pulse, for treatment-resistant depression.
Cutting road transport pollution could help plants grow
Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests.
Study points to 'unintended consequences' of heavy data surveillance in rugby
New research suggests that intense monitoring and surveillance in rugby can lead players to think more about their own results than those of the team.
Buildings can become a global CO2 sink if made out of wood instead of cement and steel
A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction by wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization.
Wild tomatoes resist devastating bacterial canker
Many tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker - the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that can spoil an entire season's planting.
UBC research reveals young children prefer to learn from confident people
Researchers found that young children between the age of four and five not only prefer to learn from people who appear confident, they also keep track of how well the person's confidence has matched with their knowledge and accuracy in the past (a concept called 'calibration') and avoid learning new information from people who have a history of being overconfident.
NASA catches the dying remnants of Tropical Cyclone 12P
Tropical Cyclone 12P formed in the Southern Pacific Ocean on January 25 and two days later, NASA's Aqua satellite observed the storm's demise.
Prairie plants need fiery romance
In a new study, researchers found that prescribed, expert-controlled fires are critically important to successful reproduction in prairie plants.
Superfast insights into cellular events
Even more detailed insights into the cell will be possible in future with the help of a new development in which Goethe University was involved: Together with scientists from Israel, the research group led by Professor Harald Schwalbe has succeeded in accelerating a hundred thousand-fold the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for investigating RNA.
For cheaper solar cells, thinner really is better
Researchers at MIT and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have outlined a pathway to slashing costs further, this time by slimming down the silicon cells themselves.
'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements
An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows.
Sea level rise to cause major economic impact in the absence of further climate action
Rising sea levels, a direct impact of the Earth's warming climate, is intensifying coastal flooding.
Gene scissors against incurable muscular disease
Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of twelve and reducing life expectancy.
Diabetes screening in barbershops to identify undiagnosed black men
This research letter reports on diabetes screening in barbershops to identify undiagnosed black men.
Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes
Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011.
Nearly all middle school teachers are highly stressed, MU study finds
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that 94% of middle school teachers experience high levels of stress, which could contribute to negative outcomes for students.
Study finds association between therapy time, length of stay after hip fracture surgery
Researchers in the George Washington University Advanced Metrics Lab found that a hip fracture patient's length of stay in a rehabilitation facility has a greater impact on functional independence than therapy time per day
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Diane's quick fade
Tropical Cyclone Diane formed late on January 24 and by the next day it was reduced to a remnant low-pressure system in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Protein AKAP8 suppresses breast cancer metastasis
A protein naturally produced in the body has been found to suppress breast cancer metastasis in animal models of human tumors.
Algae shown to improve gastrointestinal health
A green, single-celled organism called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model species for topics spanning algae-based biofuels to plant evolution.
Kiss and run: How cells sort and recycle their components
What can be reused and what can be disposed of?
New Dartmouth study explores prevalence of drug promotions in primary care practices
A new Dartmouth study finds that pharmaceutical companies' promotional access to outpatient practices that deliver primary care in the US is substantial, especially in smaller practices, those outside of healthcare systems, and those without academic affiliation, possibly impacting prescribing quality and cost.
AI can jump-start radiation therapy for cancer patients
Artificial intelligence can help cancer patients start their radiation therapy sooner -- and thereby decrease the odds of the cancer spreading -- by instantly translating complex clinical data into an optimal plan of attack.
Researchers advance solar material production
A WSU team has developed a more efficient, safer, and cost-effective way to produce cadmium telluride (CdTe) material for solar cells or other applications, a discovery that could advance the solar industry and make it more competitive.
Parkinson's disease may start before birth
People who develop Parkinson's disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to EMBARGOED Cedars-Sinai research that will publish Jan.
New bacteriophage fully characterized and sequenced
Researchers have identified a new bacteriophage that can infect and destroy bacteria in the genus Pantoea, for which few bacteriophage have been identified and characterized.
Getting to the root of plant survival
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have been able to identify hormones and proteins that interact to regulate root emergence.
Discovery of a new liquid-liquid interfacial deformation by partial miscibility
The international collaborative team has discovered for the first time in the scientific development that ''partially miscibility'', in which the two liquids do not mix completely with finite solubility, is capable of deforming the liquid-liquid interface.
Autism diagnosis test needs improvement, Rutgers researchers say
Rutgers researchers have found that a test widely used to diagnose whether children have autism is less reliable than previously assumed.
Researchers identify opportunities to advance genomic medicine
New study highlights milestones in the history of genetic discoveries; equitable and fair access required to address disparities.
Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides
A study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, authored by a New York Institute of Technology anatomy professor, suggests that neuromuscular adaptations in mammals and birds may have allowed them to become more nimble than reptiles and amphibians.
Simple test identifies patients at high risk for future dialysis or transplant
A low-cost test that screens for excess protein in the urine has been shown to accurately identify patients at higher risk for progressive kidney disease after being hospitalized for acute kidney injury, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
New type of curved acoustic beams to provide manipulations with nanoparticles
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University and Tomsk State University jointly with their colleagues from Spain modeled and experimentally confirmed the existence of a new type of curved acoustic wave beams -- acoustical hooks.
Organic farm advantages in biodiversity and profits depend on location
A large-scale meta-analysis found that organic agriculture sites had 34% more biodiversity and 50% more profits than conventional agriculture sites, even though the organic sites had 18% lower crop yields.
Revving up the engine
Research using heart cells from squirrels, mice and people identifies an evolutionary mechanism critical for heart muscle function.
NASA's Aqua satellite reveals Tropical Cyclone Esami's dissipation
Tropical Cyclone Esami formed in the Southern Indian Ocean and just three days later, visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed the storm had dissipated.
Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change
The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a 'Viewpoint' article published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Susan E.
Another reason to reduce man-made ozone: To cool a warming planet
In a News and Views article in Nature Climate Change ('Cleaner Air is a Win-Win,') Lehigh University Professor of Earth and Environmental Science, Benjamin S.
A brain link to STI/HIV sexual risk
Data show that young adult women in the United States have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that increase their risk of HIV.
Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout
A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure.
Making sense of flexible sensor systems
A team of researchers from Osaka University and Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research developed the world's thinnest and lightest magnetic sensor matrix sheet system that visualizes the two-dimensional distribution of magnetism on various surfaces, with a sensitivity ten times higher than that of conventional systems.
Research shows the sexes have equal spatial cognition skills
Men are not better than women at spatial cognition -- such as map reading -- is the principal finding from ground-breaking work by researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, hosted at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.
The brain may need iron for healthy cognitive development
Iron levels in brain tissue rise during development and are correlated with cognitive abilities, according to research in children and young adults recently published in JNeurosci.
Survival of preterm babies improves by 25% after quality-improvement program
The rate of survival of very preterm babies in Canada increased 25% after the national Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ) program was introduced in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
New treatment kills off infection that can be deadly to cystic fibrosis patients
The findings, which are published in the journal Scientific Reports, show that scientists from Aston University, Mycobacterial Research Group, combined doses of three antibiotics -- amoxicillin and imipenem-relebactam and found it was 100% effective in killing off the infection which is usually extremely difficult to treat in patients with cystic fibrosis.
Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements
Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves -- warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems -- and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation.
More rain and less snow means increased flood risk
By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western US, scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of precipitation falls as rain, offering insight into how flood risks may change in a warming world with less snow.
Airborne measurements point to low EPA methane estimates in south central US
Approximately twice as much methane is seeping into the atmosphere than the Environmental Protection Agency estimates from oil and gas facilities in the south central U.S., according to a series of measurements taken by meteorologists using NASA aircraft.
19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems
About 120 clusters of 19th-century orchid bee nests were found during restoration work on the altarpiece of Basilica Cathedral in Casco Viejo (Panamá).
Micro-scaled method holds promise as improved cancer diagnostic platform
A new-method analyzes the combination of tumor genetic material (genomics) with deep protein and phosphoprotein characterization (proteomics) using a single-needle core biopsy from a patient's tumor, providing more detailed information about the cancer than conventional approaches.
How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired».
With high fiber diets, more protein may mean more bloating
People who eat high fiber diets are more likely to experience bloating if their high fiber diet is protein-rich as compared to carbohydrate-rich, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of heart failure and premature death
Compared with routine care, weight loss surgery was linked with a reduced risk of hypertension, heart failure, and early death in a study based on information from a primary care database in the UK.
Poll: 71% of Americans say their overall health and wellness is good or excellent
A survey assessing Americans' health-related behaviors and attitudes found 71% rate their overall health and wellness as good (54%) or excellent (17%).
More youth suicide found in poor communities across US
A study led by Jennifer Hoffmann, M.D., from Ann & Robert H.
Human longevity largest study of its kind shows early detection of disease & disease risks
Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced the publication of a ground-breaking study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Rice lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash
Scientists at Rice University are using high-energy pulses of electricity to turn any source of carbon into turbostratic graphene in an instant.
Young age does not equal low risk for patients needing aortic valve replacement
While transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) continues to expand its pool of eligible patients, open heart surgery -- resulting in excellent patient survival and fewer strokes when compared to TAVR--is the best option for young and middle-aged adults with aortic valve disease -- at least for now.
Study examines poverty, suicide associations among US youth
Associations between county-level concentrations of poverty in the United States and suicide rates among children and adolescents (ages 5 to 19) were explored in this observational study.
The Lancet Planetary Health: Discriminatory redlining practices in the 1930s associated with present-day rates of emergency department visits due to asthma
Current rates of emergency department visits due to asthma are around 2.4 times higher in areas that were redlined - deprioritised for mortgage investment- in the 1930s, than in areas rated as the least risky investments (63.5 versus 26.5 visits per 10,000 residents per year), according to an observational study from eight Californian cities, published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.
Consequences of Zika virus attack on glial cells
Few studies have identified the effects of zika virus infection on astrocytes, as well as their association with developmental alterations, including brain malformations and microcephaly.
Hundreds of UCLA students publish encyclopedia of 1,000 genes linked to organ development
A research team including 245 UCLA undergraduates has published an encyclopedia of more than 1,000 genes, including 421 genes whose functions were previously unknown.
Action needed to ensure research is carried out ethically in global health emergencies
Governments, funders, and research bodies must take action to ensure that research is undertaken ethically during global health emergencies, says a new report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.
Shortness of breath and cough increase as first symptom of lung cancer
GPs are being urged to consider shortness of breath and cough as potential predictors of lung cancer, after a study found they were becoming more common as the first symptom in diagnosis.
'Lethal' mutation made tuberculosis bacteria resistant to important antibiotic
Antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis is a common and serious problem globally. In a new article, researchers from Uppsala University describe how tuberculosis bacteria that carries a mutation that in theory should kill them manages to stay alive.
Discovery could help slow down progression of Parkinson's disease
A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and Scripps Research leads to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease
anti-cancer drug safe and effective for treating light chain (AL) amyloidosis
There's a new treatment option available for patients with AL amyloidosis: daratumumab.
Doctors and immunologists implement a new approach for melanoma treatment
Worldwide, the incidence rates of skin cancer, like other types of cancer, is increasing.
Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete
The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows.
First-of-its-kind technology lights up lung cancer cells, helps improve patient outcomes
A groundbreaking tumor-highlighting technology -- OTL38 -- enhances the visualization of lung cancer tissue, providing surgeons with a significantly better chance of finding and removing more cancer than previously possible.
Genomics experts dispute nine genes linked to congenital heart condition
The Clinical Genome Resource's (ClinGen) expert panel has critically reevaluated the scientific evidence for all 17 reported genes linked to long QT syndrome, disputing nine of the genes and revealing only three of the genes to be definitively associated with the most common form of the disease.
Human Body-on-Chip platform enables in vitro prediction of drug behaviors in humans
Wyss Institute researchers have created a human Body-on-Chips platform that lays the foundation for better and faster drug testing.
Keto diet works best in small doses, Yale researchers find
A ketogenic diet -- which provides 99% of calories from fat and only 1% from carbohydrates -- produces health benefits in the short term, but negative effects after about a week, Yale researchers found in a study of mice.
The virome of HPV-positive tonsil squamous cell carcinoma and neck metastasis
In this prospective study, a pan-pathogen microarray was used to determine the virome of early stage, p16-positive OPSCC and neck metastasis treated with transoral robotic surgery and neck dissection.
Driven by Earth's orbit, climate changes in Africa may have aided human migration
New research describes a dynamic climate and vegetation model that explains when regions across Africa, areas of the Middle East, and the Mediterranean were wetter and drier and how the plant composition changed in tandem, possibly providing migration corridors throughout time.
Detection of very high frequency magnetic resonance could revolutionize electronics
A team of scientists led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered an electrical detection method for terahertz electromagnetic waves, which are extremely difficult to detect.
Unanticipated response to estrogen at the single cell level
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that not only do individual mammalian cells in a population fail to respond synchronously to estrogen stimulation, neither do individual gene copies, known as alleles.
Research suggests benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible
Last year, a UN report on global biodiversity warned one million species are at risk of extinction within decades, putting the world's natural life-support systems in jeopardy.
Discharge 3 days following open heart surgery is safe
Patients who undergo open heart surgery and head home 3 days later are not at increased risk for complications.
Unmet need for physicians, services among US adults
Twenty years of survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to examine the unmet need to see a physician and for services among insured and uninsured adults from 1998 to 2017, a time of change in the U.S. health care system that included passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
Mild cognitive impairment, ISS produces the first epidemiological estimation
In a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISS researchers estimated about 680,000 cases of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in a total of 12,730,960 migrants, aged between 60 and 89 years, living in the European Union (EU) in 2018.
Histamine: an unexpected defender against heart and kidney damage
Chronic kidney disease and heart failure are closely associated in a phenomenon known as 'cardiorenal syndrome.' Here, a University of Tsukuba research team found elevated levels of histamine in a mouse model of cardiorenal damage, and showed that enhancement of the effects of histamine could alleviate both heart and kidney damage in these mice.
APS tip sheet: Network dynamics of online polarization
Interaction dynamics reveals the mechanisms behind online polarization and social media echo chambers.
How to take a picture of a light pulse
Until now, complex experimental equipment was required to measure the shape of a light pulse.
Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays
Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers.

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