Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 29, 2020
Organoids (in vitro brains) to study pediatric brain tumors
Hundreds of miniature brains were grown in the laboratories of the University of Trento to study the genetic mechanisms responsible for the most common brain cancer affecting children.

SUTD develops revolutionary reversible 4D printing with research collaborators
Researchers from SUTD worked with NTU to revolutionise 4D printing by making a 3D fabricated material change its shape and back again repeatedly without electrical components

Scientists find far higher than expected rate of underwater glacial melting
Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that used robotic kayaks.

Watching bat coronaviruses with next-generation sequencing
This week in mSphere, an international group of researchers describe how to use enrichment -- one such emerging NGS strategy -- for monitoring coronaviruses, especially those that originate in bats.

Understanding how cells defend their genome against invaders
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have uncovered more details about the tiny defenders that ensure fertility by protecting the genomes of specialized cells called germ cells, which produce eggs and sperm.

The Lancet: 2019 novel coronavirus is genetically different to human SARS and should be considered a new human-infecting coronavirus
A new genetic analysis of 10 genome sequences of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) from nine patients in Wuhan finds that the virus is most closely related to two bat-derived SARS-like coronaviruses, according to a study published in The Lancet.

Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments
Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University.

Molecule modification could improve reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel
The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel could become safer and more efficient in future after researchers found a way to modify the structure of molecules to remove radioactive materials.

Scientists find record warm water in Antarctica, pointing to cause behind troubling glacier melt
A team of scientists has observed, for the first time, the presence of warm water at a vital point underneath a glacier in Antarctica -- an alarming discovery that points to the cause behind the gradual melting of this ice shelf while also raising concerns about sea-level rise around the globe.

Fungal decisions can affect climate
Research shows fungi may slow climate change by storing more carbon.

Catholic hospital market share and reproductive care access
Nearly 2 of every 5 women of reproductive age in the US live in counties where Catholic hospitals have a high market share, according to a new analysis.

Designing a puncture-free tire
Some golf carts and lawnmowers have airless tires, but we still have long way to go before they are on every vehicle that comes off the assembly line.

Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold
Around the world, each person eats an average of 70 pounds of corn each year, with even more grown for animal feed and biofuel.

Bluestar Genomics' breakthrough study highlights promising data for multi-cancer detection from a single blood draw
Bluestar Genomics published a new study demonstrating the efficacy of their 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) signal detection technology for its use in breast, lung, pancreatic, and prostate cancer.

Researchers capture first images of oxygen in cancer tumors during radiation therapy
Oxygen in cancer tumors is a known major factor in the success of radiation therapy, but currently there are no good ways to monitor tumor oxygenation during this treatment.

Research team investigates abnormal neuron activity in Rett syndrome
Research by Billy Lau, a postdoctoral researcher working with Assistant Professor Keerthi Krishnan at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, examines the time during which an adult female mouse first learns to recognize and respond to the distress cries of young mouse pups as an opportunity for the brain to rewire and learn again.

Smaller detection device effective for nuclear treaty verification, archaeology digs
Most nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide.

Branding in a hyperconnected world
A hyperconnected world is changing the role and management of brands.

Brain networks come 'online' during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life
New brain networks come 'online' during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Newspaper 'hierarchy' of injury glamorises war
British newspapers are routinely glamorising combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research published in the journal Media, War and Conflict.

Team creates game-based virtual archaeology field school
Before they can get started at their field site - a giant cave studded with stalactites, stalagmites and human artifacts -- 15 undergraduate students must figure out how to use their virtual hands and tools.

New study discovers inflammatory molecules controlling capillary loss
A study led by researchers at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine discovered that three major proinflammatory mediators -- interlukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and thrombin -- individually and especially when combined, directly drive capillary loss known to occur in diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and malignant cancer.

Swing feel in the lab
The role of temporal fluctuations for the swing feel in jazz music.

Unique new antiviral treatment made using sugar
New antiviral materials made from sugar have been developed to destroy viruses on contact and may help in the fight against viral outbreaks.

New guidelines will improve treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism
Radioactive iodine is to be recommended as the frontline treatment for patients with thyroid gland overactivity caused by conditions such as Graves' disease, following an evidence review led by University of Birmingham researchers.

Researchers studying motivational aspects of mindfulness find quality differs by situation
What makes people more or less mindful from one situation to the next?

Openly acknowledging social inequalities
Members of disadvantaged social groups who engage in contact with members of privileged groups are less likely to support social change toward equality, a multinational study by social psychologists at the University of Zurich shows.

Who receives advanced stroke care? It may depend on traffic
When someone has an acute stroke, access to specialized care may be dependent on traffic conditions that most adversely affect socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Hermetically sealed semi-conductors
Researchers are searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow electronic configurations.

Space super-storm likelihood estimated from longest period of magnetic field observations
A 'great' space weather super-storm large enough to cause significant disruption to our electronic and networked systems occurred on average once in every 25 years according to a new joint study by the University of Warwick and the British Antarctic Survey.

Study challenges assumptions about social interaction difficulties in autism
Results from researchers at UT Dallas suggest that successful social interactions for autistic adults revolve around partner compatibility and not just the skill set of either person.

Researchers rank 'smartest' schools of fish when it comes to travel formations
A research team from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and New York University (NYU) has showcased a new mathematical model capable of determining what formations give a school's swimmers the biggest advantage when it comes to energy efficiency and speeds, particularly when compared to school-less fishes.

Butt emissions: Study finds even extinguished cigarettes give off toxins
Our researchers here at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have discovered that a used cigarette butt - even one that is cold to the touch - can give off the equivalent of 14% of the nicotine that an actively burning cigarette emits.

Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions
Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, Cornell University researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating.

Neural effects of acute stress on appetite: a magnetoencephalography study
The authors showed that the acute mental stress induced by the anticipation of forthcoming events could suppress subjective level of appetite in humans and this suppression of the appetite appeared to be associated with the neural activity of the frontal pole involved in the thinking and planning of future actions.

New study examines the accuracy of plastic surgery videos on social media
In the era of 'Dr. Google,' social media is a tremendous influence on patients interested in cosmetic surgery, and with more than two billion users -- representing almost one-third of the internet -- YouTube has emerged as an essential platform for reaching people interested in plastic surgery.

Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?
During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease.

After a bone injury, shape-shifting cells rush to the rescue
Conventional thinking is that bone regeneration is left to a small number of mighty cells called skeletal stem cells, which reside within larger groups of bone marrow stromal cells.

A host's genes likely influence the spread of antibiotic resistance
New findings in mSphere suggest that the genetic makeup of the host organism can influence the transfer of plasmids.

Higher maternal socioeconomics offer little protection against toxic prenatal stress
When pregnant women experience elevated anxiety, stress or depression, these prenatal stressors can alter the structure of the developing fetal brain and disrupt its biochemistry -- even if these women have uncomplicated pregnancies and high socioeconomic status, according to Children's National Hospital research published online Jan.

How to head off a Red Bull habit -- study
Regular consumers of popular caffeinated energy drinks may need help kicking the habit.

NYUAD researchers develop new approach to more efficiently store and preserve human cells
Researchers from the Division of Engineering at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) have developed a new technique that utilizes filter paper to cryopreserve human cells, offering scientists an efficient alternative to conventional, long-term cryopreservation methods.

Graphene Flagship publishes handbook of graphene manufacturing
The EU-funded research project Graphene Flagship has published a comprehensive guide explaining how to produce and process graphene and related materials (GRMs).

Understanding long-term trends in ocean layering
Tohoku University geophysicist Toshio Suga collaborated with climate physicist Ryohei Yamaguchi of Korea's Pusan National University to investigate how upper-ocean stratification has changed over a period of 60 years.

Never too late to quit -- protective cells could cut risk of lung cancer for ex-smokers
Protective cells in the lungs of ex-smokers could explain why quitting smoking reduces the risk of developing lung cancer, Cancer Research UK-funded researchers have determined.

Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem
WSU study finds that environmental transmission rather than antibiotic use explains the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in people, domestic animals and wildlife.

Medicaid expansion reduce cancer, saves black lives
Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina could sharply lessen the burden of colon cancers in the state and save the lives of thousands of Black men as well as improving access to care for men of all races, UConn Health and University of North Carolina researchers report in the 27 January issue of PLOS One.

Sex pheromone named for Jane Austen character alters brain in mouse courtship
The infamously aloof Mr. Darcy had a hard time attracting members of the opposite sex in Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice.' But the same cannot be said for a sex pheromone named for him, called darcin.

Suicidal thoughts among US Army soldiers deployed to Afghanistan
Among nearly 4,000 US Army soldiers deployed in Afghanistan, 11.7% reported suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives, 3.0% within the past year and 1.9% within the past 30 days on questionnaires completed at the midpoint of their deployment in 2012.

Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota
Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients as is a key component for healthy crop production globally.

Buck researchers discover how cellular senescence leads to neurodegeneration
Although a link has been established between chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases, there have been many open questions regarding how cellular senescence, a process whereby cells that stop dividing under stress spew out a mix of inflammatory proteins, affects these pathologies.

Releasing artificially-infected mosquitoes could reduce global dengue cases by 90%
Releasing mosquitoes infected with a type of bacteria that prevents them transmitting dengue could cut cases of the disease by as much as 90%.

Discovery reveals antibiotic-resistant strep throat may be too close for comfort
Infectious disease scientists identified strains of group A streptococcus that are less susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, a sign that the germ causing strep throat and flesh-eating disease may be moving closer to resistance to penicillin and other related antibiotics known as beta-lactams.

Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons
Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin.

On the menu: Study says dining out is a recipe for unhealthy eating for most Americans
Study finds most restaurant meals eaten by Americans are of poor nutritional quality; minimal changes over 14 years.

Infectious disease experts warn of outbreak risks in US border detention centers
Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the US Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency.

Scientists have identified the role of chronic inflammation as the cause of accelerated aging
Claudio Franceschi, a world-renowned scientist, professor at the University of Bologna (Italy) and head of the Research Laboratory for Systems Medicine of Healthy Aging at Lobachevsky University, together with other members of an international research team, has described the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and identified several risk factors leading to disease.

NRL researchers' golden touch enhances quantum technology
US Naval Research Laboratory scientists discover a new platform for quantum technologies by suspending two-dimensional (2-D) crystals over pores in a slab of gold.

Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom
To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology.

Meteorites reveal high carbon dioxide levels on early Earth
Tiny meteorites no larger than grains of sand hold new clues about the atmosphere on ancient Earth, according to scientists.

NSF's newest solar telescope produces first images, most detailed images of the sun
Just released first images from the National Science Foundation's Daniel K.

Guardian angel of the eye
The lens of the human eye comprises a highly concentrated protein solution, which lends the lens its great refractive power.

Food packaging that's good enough to eat
These days, many people are concerned about plastic waste; however, the convenience, mechanical properties and cost of plastic food packaging are hard to beat.

Identified a determinant protein for tumor progression and metastasis in Rhabdomyos
LOXL2 increases the metastatic capacity of tumors from Rhabdomyoarcoma, a childhood cancer.

Researchers identify mechanism that triggers a rare type of muscular dystrophy
A study led by the IBB-UAB has identified the molecular mechanism through which a protein, when carrying genetic mutations associated with a rare disease known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1G, accelerates its tendency to form amyloid fibrils and finally triggers the appearance of the disease.

Take-home' exposures are public health hazard: BU and Harvard researchers
A new review by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the Harvard T.H.

Prescribed burns benefit bees
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

Demand for drone delivery in e-retail is high, ability to meet that demand low
Consumers want what they want, and they want it now.

Siri, help me quit -- what does your smart device say when you ask for help with addiction?
A new study published in Nature Partner Journal's Digital Medicine finds that the leading intelligent virtual assistants fail to understand questions about where to find help for substance misuse.

Anti-solar cells: A photovoltaic cell that works at night
What if solar cells worked at night? That's no joke, according to Jeremy Munday, professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC Davis.

Cheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the lab
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells.

Scientists discover link between autism and cognitive impairment
Scientists have found how a single gene fragment impacts social behaviour and cognitive ability, revealing a common molecular mechanism for autism and Fragile X syndrome.

Mixed chimerism improves long-term kidney transplant outlook
Mixed chimerism - the continued mixing of donor and recipient blood cells following a transplant of blood progenitor cells - could improve outcomes for kidney transplant recipients, according to a new clinical study in about 50 patients.

Finer particulate matter (PM1) could increase cardiovascular disease risk
In addition to harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, air pollution contains tiny particles that have been linked to health problems, including cardiovascular disease and asthma.

Success and failure of ecological management is highly variable
What do we really know about reasons attributed to the success or failure of wildlife management efforts?

Blind as a bat? The genetic basis of echolocation in bats and whales
Scientists reveal that similar genetic mutations led to the establishment of echolocation in both bats and whales.

Fungi as food source for plants
The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed.

New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues, describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells.

Drug lord's hippos make their mark on foreign ecosystem
UC San Diego scientists and their colleagues have published the first scientific assessment of the impact that an invasive hippo population, imported by infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar, is having on Colombian aquatic ecosystems.

Immune responses to tuberculosis mapped across 3 species
A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.

A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems.

Associations between work environment and rushed, missed care tasks in nursing homes
Associations between work environment (including staffing, culture and leadership) and self-reported missed or rushed tasks by care aides in nursing homes in Canada were analyzed in this observational study.

New way of recycling plant-based plastics instead of letting them rot in landfill
Scientists at the University of Bath have developed a chemical recycling method that breaks down plastics into their original building blocks, potentially allowing them to be recycled repeatedly without losing quality.

NEJM: transcatheter aortic valve replacement shows similar safety outcomes as open-heart surgery
A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and other centers nationwide shows that patients who underwent a minimally invasive transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), had similar key 5-year clinical outcomes of death and stroke as patients who had traditional open-heart surgery to replace the valve.

Quantum logic spectroscopy unlocks potential of highly charged ions
Scientists from the PTB and the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK), both Germany, have carried out pioneering optical measurements of highly charged ions with unprecedented precision.

Brain tumors remodel neuronal synapses to promote growth
Scientists discovered that glioma, a lethal form of brain cancer, alters the activity of neighboring neurons, accelerating a vicious cycle that drives tumor-associated epilepsy and tumor progression.

Poverty associated with suicide risk in children and adolescents
Between 2007 to 2016, nearly 21,000 children ages 5-19 years old died by suicide.

A new method of artificial intelligence inspired by the functioning of the human brain
Researchers at the University of Liège (ULiège) have developed a new algorithm based on a biological mechanism called neuromodulation.

Study finds economic assistance in Afghanistan largely failed to reduce support for the Taliban
A Dartmouth-led study finds that two common economic interventions in Afghanistan designed to improve economic livelihoods and win the ''hearts of minds'' of civilians was ineffective in reducing support for the Taliban in the long run.

Gut reaction: How immunity ramps up against incoming threats
A new study has revealed how the gut's protective mechanisms ramp up significantly with food intake, and at times of the day when mealtimes are anticipated based on regular eating habits.

The Lancet: Report provides largest clinical and treatment data set from cases of new coronavirus in China
A new analysis, published in The Lancet, includes 99 patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) who were transferred to Jinyintan Hospital, an adult infectious disease hospital admitting the first 2019-nCoV cases from hospitals across Wuhan, between January 1 and January 20, 2020.

Stress test reveals graphene won't crack under pressure
Graphene is a paradox. It is the thinnest material known to science, yet also one of the strongest.

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections
According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health.

Hope for enhanced UTI treatments to minimize bladder pain
The fight against Urinary Tract Infection pain, discomfort and a constant urge to urinate has taken a step forward with scientists identifying how the immune systems defence against bladder infection causes nerves to magnify sensations felt by patients.

Highly active adults vary their workouts to meet exercise recommendations
Highly active adults engage in a greater variety of physical activities than do less active adults, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

Study finds black and Hispanic patients face more barriers when making doctor appointments
Discrimination may cause black and Hispanic patients to wait longer for a scheduled primary care appointment, according to a new Tulane University study published in JAMA Network Open.

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds
For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice.

Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes
ETH researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows.

Researchers combine technologies to resolve plant pathogen genomes
With the help of new genomic sequencing and assembly tools, plant scientists can learn more about the function and evolution of highly destructive plant pathogens that refuse to be tamed by fungicides, antibacterial, and antivirals.

Monitoring intermediates in CO2 conversion to formate by metal catalyst
The production of formate from CO2 is considered an attractive strategy for the long-term storage of solar renewable energy in chemical form.

Yale-NUS research shows airborne microbes link Great Barrier Reef and Australian continent
A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College Professor of Science (Environmental Studies) Stephen Pointing has discovered a link between two different ecosystems, continental Australia and the Great Barrier Reef, due to airborne microbes that travel from the former to the latter.

Express yourself: Dermal fillers restore youthful facial movement, don't just fill wrinkles
Used for facial rejuvenation, dermal fillers do more than just fill in wrinkles.

Ordering in? Plants are way ahead of you
Dissolved carbon in soil can quench plants' ability to communicate with soil microbes, allowing plants to fine-tune their relationships with symbionts.

Study shows promising new web approach to prevent firearm suicide
Clinicians and researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus created Lock to Live, a web resource to help suicidal adults - and family, friends or providers -- make decisions about reducing access to firearms, medications, and other potential suicide methods.

Researchers develop new bio-inspired wing design for small drones
Taking a cue from birds and insects, Brown University researchers have come up with a new wing design for small drones that helps them fly more efficiently and makes them more robust to atmospheric turbulence.

Molecular motors direct the fate of stem cells
Scientists at the University of Groningen and the University Medical Center Groningen used molecular motors to manipulate the protein matrix on which bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are grown.

One step closer to tailored treatment of severe rheumatic diseases
A new research project from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark suggest that it is the composition of cells in the joint of the individual patient which determines whether the medicine is effective or not.

Synchronized swimming: Biology on a micro-scale
Researchers model interactions between unique fluids and tiny structures.

Does lung damage speed pancreatic cancer?
High levels of CO2 in the body, due to chronic respiratory disorders, may exacerbate pancreatic cancer, making it more aggressive and resistant to therapy.

Long life, good health
The American Heart Association 2030 Impact Goals aim to help all people live healthier for more years of their life.

Hybrid technique to produce stronger nickel for auto, medical, manufacturing
Purdue University innovators have created a hybrid technique to fabricate a new form of nickel that may help the future production of lifesaving medical devices, high-tech devices and vehicles with strong corrosion-resistant protection.

Common form of heart failure could be treated with already approved anticancer drug
Thanks to new research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, a drug capable of reversing a common form of heart failure known as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) may soon be available.

A new treatment strategy against MERS
First identified in 2012, the MERS-coronavirus is capable of causing severe pneumonia.

Tougher start could help captive-bred game birds
Tougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests.

Genetics contributes to mental health risks in adoptees
The adoption of children is a fundamental method of building families.

What a pair! Coupled quantum dots may offer a new way to store quantum information
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have for the first time created and imaged a novel pair of quantum dots -- tiny islands of confined electric charge that act like interacting artificial atoms.

Study reveals new way to treat stroke using an already FDA-approved drug
Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is currently used to treat neutropenia due to chemotherapy and has been successfully used for patients who require bone marrow transplants.

UCLA researchers find chronic inflammation contributes to cancer metastasis
The study reveals a detailed epigenetic mechanism for how interleukin-1-beta, a common cytokine that helps fight infections during inflammation, plays a critical role in cancer metastasis.

The Global Reef Expedition: Kingdom of Tonga
The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation has published their findings from extensive coral reef surveys conducted in the Kingdom of Tonga.

Owners of high-status cars are on a collision course with traffic
Self-centred men who are argumentative, stubborn, disagreeable and unempathetic are much more likely to own a high-status car.

An ultrafast microscope for the quantum world
Processes taking place inside tiny electronic components or in molecules can now be filmed at a resolution of a few hundred attoseconds and down to the individual atom.

Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor
Researchers discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound.

It's closeness that counts: how proximity affects the resistance of graphene
Graphene is seen as the wonder material of the future.

Do DIY DNA kits revive a harmful perceived link between genetics and race?
When genetic-ancestry kits first emerged, social scientists worried they would revive an old and harmful view that genetics determined race and a person's abilities.

Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea
New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea.

A targeted therapy for triple negative breast cancer may lie existing drugs
A newly published study in the journal Cancer Research signals a potential treatment breakthrough for patients with triple negative breast cancer -- a form of the disease that disproportionately affects and also tends to develop more aggressively in black women.

Researchers develop first all-optical, stealth encryption technology at Ben-Gurion University
'Basically, the innovative breakthrough is that if you can't detect it, you can't steal it,' Professor Sadot says.

Living longer is important, but those years need to be healthy ones
In a new Presidential Advisory, the American Heart Association outlines 2030 Impact Goals for the United States and globally, to help all people live healthier for more years of their life.

ASHG survey finds Americans strongly support human genetics research and potential
Americans are excited and optimistic about genetics and its emerging health applications, per a new survey by ASHG and Research!America.

Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease
The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome.

Avoid paying so people work
Unlike the case in many developed countries, the Russian government is ready to provide financial support to all people who are registered unemployed.

Engineers design bionic 'heart' for testing prosthetic valves, other cardiac devices
Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a bionic 'heart' that offers a more realistic model for testing out artificial valves and other cardiac devices.

First release of genetically engineered moth could herald new era of crop protection
For decades, the agriculture industry has been trying to find biological and environmentally friendly ways to manage the diamondback moth, which is widely resistant to insecticides.

Scientists discover how malaria parasites import sugar
Researchers at Stockholm University has established how sugar is taken up by the malaria parasite, a discovery with the potential to improve the development of antimalarial drugs.

Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments
Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles.

Not 'brains in a dish': Cerebral organoids flunk comparison to developing nervous system
A new UC San Francisco study offers a more restrained perspective on brain organoids suggested for lab experiments, by showing that widely used organoid models fail to replicate even basic features of brain development and organization, much less the complex circuitry needed to model complex brain diseases or normal cognition.

Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside
Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas.

Single-cell sequencing of CLL therapy: Shared genetic program, patient-specific execution
Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine and partners in Budapest have studied the response to targeted leukemia therapy in unprecedented detail, using single-cell sequencing and epigenetic analysis.

Missing link in rare inherited skin disease exposed
Hokkaido University scientists are getting closer to understanding how a rare hereditary disease impairs the skin's barrier function, which determines how well the skin is protected.

Are you 'at risk' of being a habitual tofu eater?
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) in Japan and colleagues at Osaka University have found genetic variations in humans related to specific dietary habits.

A nanoscale lattice of palladium and yttrium makes for a superlative carbon-linking catalyst
A group of materials scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology has shown that a palladium-based intermetallic electride, Y3Pd2, can improve the efficiency of carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions.

To make amino acids, just add electricity
By finding the right combination of abundantly available starting materials and catalyst, Kyushu University researchers were able to synthesize amino acids with high efficiency through a reaction driven by electricity.

One quarter of bacterial pathogens can spread antibiotic resistance directly to peers
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that at least 25 percent of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria found in clinical settings are capable of spreading their resistance directly to other bacteria.

Low-calorie sweeteners do not mean low risk for infants
Researchers discovered consuming low-calorie sweeteners like aspartame and stevia while pregnant increased body fat in their offspring and disrupted their gut microbiota.
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