Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 03, 2020
Losing coastal plant communities to climate change will weaken sea defences
New research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the impact of rising sea levels and the increased frequency and intensity of extreme storm events on coastal plants needs to be placed in greater focus.

Showing how the tiniest particles in our universe saved us from complete annihilation
Gravitational waves could contain evidence to prove that neutrino particles reshuffled matter and anti-matter, explains a new study.

How and when spines changed in mammalian evolution
Researchers compared modern and ancient animals to explore how mammalian vertebrae have evolved into sophisticated physical structures that can carry out multiple functions.

Heart disease risk grows as women move through menopause
A marker for heart disease risk considerably worsens as women transition through menopause, according to a new analysis from the largest and longest running study of women's health in midlife.

How nature tells us its formulas
A team from TU Wien and the University of Heidelberg has developed methods with which these models can be directly obtained from experimental measurements.

Exposing a virus's hiding place reveals new potential vaccine
By figuring out how a common virus hides from the immune system, scientists have identified a potential vaccine to prevent sometimes deadly respiratory infections in humans.

Bringing the 'sticky' back to pancreatic cancer
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Japan's Tohoku University has found that a gene regulator, called BACH1, facilitates the spread of pancreatic cancer to other parts of the body.

Scientists listen to whales, walruses, & seals in a changing arctic seascape
A year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington.

Shift workers at risk for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes
Working nights disrupts individuals' circadian rhythm, the body's internal clock responsible for neural and hormonal signaling.

Making light work
A collaboration between McMaster and Harvard researchers has generated a new platform in which light beams communicate with one another through solid matter, establishing the foundation to explore a new form of computing.

New research finds that ACOs are struggling to integrate social services with medical care
New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the February issue of Health Affairs, show that despite effort and attention on the part of some healthcare providers to better address their patients' social needs, little progress is being made to integrate social services with medical care.

Fragile: Handle with care
About 1.6 million patients are transferred between hospitals each year, but the risk of death remains higher for transfer patients than for patients admitted locally via the emergency department.

Hospital websites lack usability for non-English speakers
English proficiency shouldn't be a barrier to health care. But a patient who needs language services would have to navigate through one to four web pages in English to find information on such services at most hospitals in Washington, according to new WSU research.

Government grants deliver highest returns for college financing, says study
Merit-based grants are a government's best bet for providing effective student aid for long-term economic growth - increasing both welfare (measured in terms of long-term well-being outcomes) and efficiency, according to a new joint study from the University of British Columbia, Queen's, Princeton and Yale.

ESMO reaffirms commitment to education as key lever to make cancer prevention effective
ESMO reaffirms commitment to education as key lever to make cancer prevention effective.

APS tip sheet: modeling the matter after big bang expansion
Matter's fragmentation after the big bang.

Aerobic exercise training linked to enhanced brain function
Amsterdam, NL, February 3, 2020 - Individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) because of family history or genetic predisposition who engaged in six months of aerobic exercise training improved their brain glucose metabolism and higher-order thinking abilities (e.g., planning and mental flexibility) called executive function; these improvements occurred in conjunction with increased cardiorespiratory fitness.

Arctic permafrost thaw plays greater role in climate change than previously estimated
Abrupt thawing of permafrost will double previous estimates of potential carbon emissions from permafrost thaw in the Arctic, and is already rapidly changing the landscape and ecology of the circumpolar north, a new CU Boulder-led study finds.

Knowledge Engine is ready to accelerate genomic research
Five years ago, a team of computer scientists, biomedical researchers, and bioinformaticians set out to bring the power of collective knowledge to genomic research.

Cold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanoma
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the UCLA has developed a medicated patch that can deliver immune checkpoint inhibitors and cold plasma directly to tumors to help boost the immune response and kill cancer cells.

Personalized 3D printed models in optimizing cardiac computed tomography imaging protocols
Prof. Zhonghua Sun at Curtin University, Australia, explains the novel applications of personalised 3D printed cardiovascular models for developing cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols with the goal of obtaining acceptable image quality with minimal radiation doses.

Closely spaced hydrogen atoms could facilitate superconductivity in ambient conditions
An international team of researchers discovered the hydrogen atoms in a common metal hydride material are much more tightly spaced than had been predicted for decades--a feature that could possibly facilitate superconductivity at or near room temperature and pressure.

New argument presented to highlight the axion nature of dark matter
According to the hypothesis, axionic dark matter, provoking structural rearrangement in compact stars with a strong magnetic field, can protect them from a catastrophic loss of magnetic energy, but at the same time allows such objects to rotate abnormally fast.

Natural herb kratom may have therapeutic effects and relatively low potential for abuse or harm, according to a user survey
Using results of a survey of more than 2,700 self-reported users of the herbal supplement kratom, sold online and in smoke shops around the U.S., Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that the psychoactive compound somewhat similar to opioids likely has a lower rate of harm than prescription opioids for treating pain, anxiety, depression and addiction.

Chemists unveil the structure of an influenza B protein
MIT chemists have discovered the structure of an influenza B protein called BM2, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and help prevent the virus from spreading.

How the development of skulls and beaks made Darwin's finches one of the most diverse species
Darwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success.

Research sheds light on the evolutionary puzzle of coupling
A UTSA researcher has discovered that, whether in a pair or in groups, success in primate social systems may also provide insight into organization of human social life.

Novel compound is promising drug candidate for Alzheimer's disease
As published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Chemical Communications, a compound known as 'C1' uses a novel mechanism to efficiently prevent the enzyme gamma-secretase from producing amyloids.

Seeing the invisible -- A novel gas imaging system
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University developed a novel device to image and quantify volatile gases that are released through the skin in real-time.

Scientists examined bacterial cannibalism
Researchers from Sechenov University and their colleagues summarised the results of various studies devoted to the process that can be described as bacterial cannibalism.

Shift in treatment modalities associated with improved outcomes in uveal melanoma patients with live
New retrospective study indicates that the shift of treatment from systemic chemotherapies to liver-directed therapies provides survival benefits.

Study: How to safely remove ovary in girls for best results in fertility preservation
Using an experimental piglet model, researchers defined the safest laparoscopic technique for removing the ovary in young girls that also results in the best quality ovarian tissue for fertility preservation.

Researchers study the intricate link between climate and conflict
New research from the University of Notre Dame is shedding light on the unexpected effects climate change could have on regional instability and violent conflict.

Assessing 'stickiness' of tumor cells could improve cancer prognosis
Researchers led by UC San Diego built a device that sorts and separates cancer cells from the same tumor based on how 'sticky' they are.

For complex decisions, narrow them down to two
When choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options.

French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani honoured with a new orb-weaver
Considered as one of the best studied spiders, the orb-weavers remain poorly known in the central parts of the Palearctic ecozone.

New method for removing oil from water
Oil poses a considerable danger to aquatic life. Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Aachen and the Heimbach-GmbH have developed a new technology for the removal of such contaminations: Textiles with special surface properties passively skim off the oil and move it into a floating container.

Water, water everywhere -- and it's weirder than you think
Researchers at The University of Tokyo show that liquid water has 2 distinct molecular arrangements: tetrahedral and non-tetrahedral.

Vast amounts of valuable energy, nutrients, water lost in world's fast-rising wastewater streams
Vast amounts of valuable energy, agricultural nutrients, and water could potentially be recovered from the world's fast-rising volume of municipal wastewater, a new UN study says.

Structural biology: Special delivery
Bulky globular proteins require specialized transport systems for insertion into membranes.

National study confirms nurses at higher risk of suicide than general population
In the first national study of its size, researchers at UC San Diego have found that nurses are at higher risk of suicide than the general population.

Viscosity measurements offer new insights into the earth's mantle
An international research group with Dr. Longjian Xie from the Bavarian Research Institute of Experimental Geochemistry & Geophysics (BGI) of the University of Bayreuth has succeeded for the first time in measuring the viscosity that molten solids exhibit under the pressure and temperature conditions found in the lower earth mantle.

Researchers identify link between decreased depressive symptoms, yoga and the neurotransmitter GABA
The benefits of yoga have been widely documented by scientific research, but previously it was not clear as to how yoga exerts its physiologic effect.

How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptance
In a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression.

Two million Americans lost health coverage/access in Trump's first year: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that two million more Americans avoided health care because of inability to pay, and/or did not have health insurance, at the end of 2017 compared to the end of 2016.

Homicide among pregnant, postpartum women in Louisiana
Researchers examined how often homicide was the cause of death among women in Louisiana who were pregnant or up to one year postpartum compared with other causes.

Agricultural area residents in danger of inhaling toxic aerosols
Excess selenium from fertilizers and other natural sources can create air pollution that could lead to lung cancer, asthma, and Type 2 diabetes, according to new UC Riverside research.

Lower protein diet may lessen risk for cardiovascular disease
A plant-based diet may be key to lowering risk for heart disease.

Designing an emergency stop switch for immunotherapies
CAR T-cell therapy is a highly promising treatment strategy for tumors, but is associated with life-threatening side effects.

Homicide is a leading cause of pregnancy-associated death in Louisiana
Homicide is a leading cause of death among pregnant and postpartum women in Louisiana, according to an analysis of birth and death records from 2016 and 2017.

Birth timing may affect brain development
Moving birth a day early triggers an early start to widespread neuron death, according to new research in mice published in eNeuro.

Green infrastructure provides benefits that residents are willing to work for, study shows
Urban areas face increasing problems with stormwater management. Green infrastructure, including features such as rain barrels, green roofs, rain gardens, and on-site water treatment, can provide affordable and environmentally sound ways to manage precipitation.

Butterflies can acquire new scent preferences and pass these on to their offspring
Two studies from the National University of Singapore demonstrate that insects can learn from their previous experiences and adjust their future behaviour for survival and reproduction.

The sleeping Sigma-Factor
previously unknown mechanism enables bacterial antibiotic resistance

Fireflies face global threats
Worldwide declines in insect populations have garnered significant attention of late.

Link between chronic kidney disease and heart failure is identified in patients
People with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk for heart disease and heart-disease death.

Making high-temperature superconductivity disappear to understand its origin
Purely electronic interactions could be behind copper-oxygen compounds conducting electricity without resistance at relatively high temperatures.

New way to study pituitary tumors holds potential for better diagnoses and treatments
Houston Methodist neurosurgeons are looking at a new way to classify pituitary tumors that could lead to more precise and accurate diagnosing for patients in the future.

If cancer were easy, every cell would do it
A new paper puts an evolutionary twist on a classic question.

UT scientists' fossil-finding board game is a success in classrooms
Drawing inspiration straight from the source material, two researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have designed their own game of chance and skill -- a board game that puts students in the role of time-travelling paleontologists -- to teach key concepts about how fossils form.

A study identifies 17 key compounds in wine aromas
The research focused on a kind of wine made with alternative aging methods other than the classic barrel method

IDIBELL researchers discover that a molecule of blood is effective against autoimmune kidney disease
A research team from IDIBELL identifies C3BP (beta-) as a potential treatment for lupidic nephritis in an animal model.

Researchers validate transferable & accessible method to quantify flavanols & procyanidins
Building on over two decades of research, Mars and the University of California Davis have developed a new methodology to measure cocoa flavanols and procyanidins that is more accurate and more reliable than previous analytical approaches.

Building a safer CAR-T therapy
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has devised a new type of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell -- a family of promising immunotherapies for cancer -- that can be switched on and off on demand.

Authentic behavior at work leads to greater productivity, study shows
Matching behavior with the way you feel -- in other words, not faking it -- is more productive at work and leads to other benefits, according to a new study co-authored by Chris Rosen, management professor in the Sam M.

Army-developed Zika vaccine induces potent Zika and dengue cross-neutralizing antibodies
A new study led by WRAIR scientists has shown for the first time that a single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine in a dengue-experienced individual can boost pre-existing flavivirus immunity and elicit protective cross-neutralizing antibody responses against both Zika and dengue viruses.

Study: Aerosols have an outsized impact on extreme weather
A reduction in manmade aerosols in Europe has been tied to a reduction in extreme winter weather in the region.

Tumbleweeds or fibrils: Tau proteins need to choose
Simulations by Rice scientists suggests two paths tau proteins may take in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's and Pick's diseases.

Finding the source of chemical reactions
In a collaborative project with MIT and other universities, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have experimentally detected the fleeting transition state that occurs at the origin of a chemical reaction.

Brain study identifies possible causes of ethnic pain disparities
In a new study, researchers identify possible brain and social factors underlying racial and ethnic disparities in pain.

Early life experiences biologically and functionally mature the brain, new research shows
Experiences early in life have an impact on the brain's biological and functional development, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists.

Lights out? Fireflies face extinction threats of habitat loss, light pollution, pesticides
Habitat loss, pesticide use and, surprisingly, artificial light are the three most serious threats endangering fireflies across the globe, raising the specter of extinction for certain species whose features render them more vulnerable to specific threats.

Math models add up to improved cancer immunotherapy
A merger of math and medicine may help to improve the efficacy of immunotherapies, potentially life-saving treatments that enhance the ability of the patient's own immune system to attack cancerous tumors.

Researchers turbocharge hydrogen fuel cells with novel ion-conducting copolymer
New research led by Miguel Modestino, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at NYU Tandon, detailed in the report 'Highly Permeable Perfluorinated Sulfonic Acid Ionomers for Improved Electrochemical Devices: Insights into Structure -- Property Relationships,' published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, details a hybrid material that could boost power of hydrogen fuel cells while reducing the need for expensive materials like platinum.

Extinction is difficult to prove for Earth's ultra-rare species
A recent study by the University of Kent has called for an increase in scientific surveys and collection of specimens to confirm the extinction of ultra-rare species.

Australia's orroral valley fire consumes over 155,000 acres in a week
NASA's Terra satellite saw yet another fire, known as the Orroral Valley Fire, break out in the Canberra region of Australia, specifically in and around the Namadgi National Park.

Examining consumption of processed meat, unprocessed red meat, poultry or fish with risk of CVD, death
Data for nearly 30,000 adults from six study groups in the US were used to investigate associations between eating processed meat, unprocessed red meat, poultry or fish and the risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause.

Occupational gender bias prevalent in online images, Rutgers study finds
Rutgers researchers say gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms.

Hepatitis B: New therapeutic approach may help to cure chronic hepatitis B infection
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have developed a novel therapeutic approach to cure chronic hepatitis B.

The secret life of microbes -- a snapshot of molecules in a deep-sea symbiosis
Mussels in the deep sea can only survive there thanks to symbiotic bacteria living inside of them.

The one ring -- to track your finger's location
UW researchers have created AuraRing, a ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone's index finger and continuously track hand movements.

Symbiotic viruses help host insects override the plant's defenses
Aphids, small sap-sucking insects, are virus carriers responsible for significant economic losses in many crops worldwide.

Sound of music: How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginess
New research suggests melodic alarms could improve alertness, with harsh alarm tones linked to increased levels of morning grogginess.

Pioneering SFU research customizes vaccines to reduce bacterial disease
The invention of vaccines for disease prevention is often cited as one of the miracles of modern medicine.

'Wristwatch' monitors body chemistry to boost athletic performance, prevent injury
Engineering researchers have developed a device the size of a wristwatch that can monitor an individual's body chemistry to help improve athletic performance and identify potential health problems.

New score measuring multiple chronic illnesses performs better than current method
A new score that measures multiple long-term health conditions performs better than the current Charlson Comorbidity Index and may help in health care planning and delivery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

HIV antibody therapy is associated with enhanced immune responses in infected individuals
Studies have demonstrated that immunotherapy combining two anti-HIV antibodies can suppress HIV, similar to antiretroviral therapy (ART).

New device identifies high-quality blood donors
Blood banks have long known about high-quality donors - individuals whose red blood cells stay viable longer in storage and in the recipient's body.

How the ocean is gnawing away at glaciers
The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster today than it did only a few years ago.

Tailor-made vaccines could almost halve rates of serious bacterial disease
New research has found that rates of disease caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae could be substantially reduced by changing our approach to vaccination.

Ancient Greek tholos-like architecture composed of archaeal proteins
Collaborative research groups discovered a unique supramolecular structure composed of hyperthermophilic archaeal proteins.

New study links autism to specific cell, paves way for potential approach to treatment
People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appear to suffer malfunctions in a cell that produces a special coating around nerve fibers that facilitates efficient electrical communication across the brain.

Helping patients with binge eating disorders: There's an app for that
Study suggests that adaptation of smartphone technology is a scalable option that significantly improves clinical outcomes.

Study demonstrates liquid biopsy as effective predictor of stage III melanoma relapse and treatment
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that circulating tumor cells (CTCs), a form of liquid biopsy, was independently associated with melanoma relapse, suggesting CTC assessment may be useful in identifying patients at risk for relapse who could benefit from more aggressive therapy following primary treatment.

New electrode design may lead to more powerful batteries
New research by engineers at MIT and elsewhere could lead to batteries that can pack more power per pound and last longer, based on the long-sought goal of using pure lithium metal as one of the battery's two electrodes, the anode.

Value transformation framework model seeks to guide transition to value-based healthcare
With a new focus on quality of care and outcomes achieved, healthcare organizations are challenged to make the transition to value-based care.

Drexel study: Physical activity is good for your appetite, too
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) at Drexel University found exercise to be a protective factor in a study where participants in a weight loss program, who were following a reduced-calorie diet, engaged in exercise in their real-world environments.

Flickering light mobilizes brain chemistry that may fight Alzheimer's
The promise of flickering light to treat Alzheimer's takes another step forward in this new study, which reveals stark biochemical mechanisms: 40 Hertz stimulus triggers a marked release of signaling chemicals.

Questions and answers about cannabis use during pregnancy
A new study shows that women have many medical questions about the use of cannabis both before and during pregnancy, and during the postpartum period while breastfeeding.

Microplastic hotspots
A new study from the University of Delaware found high concentrations of microplastics in so-called convergence zones, the areas where the fresher water from the Delaware River meets the saltier water of the Atlantic Ocean and the surface currents converge.

Weather radar records drastic drop in mayfly populations
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, the University of Notre Dame and Virginia Tech applied radar technology -- the same used for meteorology -- to quantify the number of mayflies that emerged annually from two different bodies of water: the Upper Mississippi River and the Western Lake Erie Basin.

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others?

Scientists discover new non-sticky gels
Scientists from the University of Bristol and Université Paris-Saclay have discovered a new class of material - non-sticky gels.

New quantum switch turns metals into insulators
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have demonstrated an entirely new way to precisely control electrical currents by leveraging the interaction between an electron's spin and its orbital rotation around the nucleus.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: First clinical trial of antibody to neutralize henipaviruses finds it is safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers
The first ever treatment for preventing a group of viruses from causing potentially lethal infections has been tested in a phase I clinical trial, and was found to be safe and able to neutralize the viruses, according to results from 40 patients published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.

More grocery stores means less food waste -- and a big carbon cut
One strategy for reducing food waste's environmental impact is as counterintuitive as it is straightforward: Open more grocery stores.

Kids diagnosed with ADHD often don't take medication regularly
Children diagnosed with ADHD inconsistently take their prescribed medication, going without treatment 40 per cent of the time, a new study has found.

Climate change affects soil health
Climate change is affecting the health of agricultural soils. Increased heat and drought make life easy for the pathogenic fungus Pythium ultimum.

Many with military-related PTSD do poorly in treatment with first-line psychotherapies
A review of recent clinical trials paints a sobering picture of the usefulness of first-line psychotherapies in treating active duty military personnel and veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

OU study finds the fingerprint of paddy rice in atmospheric methane concentration dynamics
A University of Oklahoma-led study shows that paddy rice (both area and plant growth) is significantly related to the spatial-temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia, where 87% of paddy rice fields are situated in the world.

Flushing nitrogen from seawater-based toilets
With about half the world's population living close to the coast, using seawater to flush toilets could be possible with a salt-tolerant bacterium.

Meat isn't good for you
A large study links red and processed meat with higher risk of heart disease and death.

First-ever experimental Sudan virus specific antibody treatment protects animals
Army scientists working with partners from industry and academia have developed an experimental treatment that protects animals from Sudan virus, which is closely related to Ebola.

New deep learning model can accurately identify sleep stages
A new deep learning model developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland can identify sleep stages as accurately as an experienced physician.

SwRI-led team identifies low-energy solar particles from beyond Earth near the Sun
Using data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe (PSP), a team led by Southwest Research Institute identified low-energy particles lurking near the Sun that likely originated from solar wind interactions well beyond Earth orbit.

UNH researchers find clues to how hazardous space radiation begins
Scientists at the University of New Hampshire have unlocked one of the mysteries of how particles from flares on the sun accumulate at early stages in the energization of hazardous radiation that is harmful to astronauts, satellites and electronic equipment.

Invest in social equity to improve health for low-income people
Canada must invest in social spending and recognize that our health care system is not 'universal' if Canadians living in low-income neighborhoods are to have the same chance of good health as other Canadians, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Changes in the cost over tine of HIV antiretroviral therapy in US
Researchers calculated the average cost of recommended initial HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in the US from 2012 to 2018 and analyzed how this cost has changed over the years.

Elevated fasting blood sugar in pregnancy linked to harmful outcomes for mothers, babies
Women with gestational diabetes who have elevated blood sugar levels before eating are at higher risk for complications than those whose blood sugar is only elevated after meals -- even when their diabetes is treated, according to a new study from the University of Alberta.

A fundamental discovery about how gene activity is regulated
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a fundamental mechanism that regulates gene activity in cells.

Political TV ads referencing guns increased eightfold over four election cycles
The number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in US media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Army develops big data approach to neuroscience
A big data approach to neuroscience promises to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between brain activity and performance.

Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weed
The herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history.

One single primitive turtle resisted mass extinction in the northern hemisphere
Sixty-six million years ago, in the emerged lands of Laurasia -now the northern hemisphere- a primitive land tortoise, measuring about 60 cm, managed to survive the event that killed the dinosaurs.

Past climate safe havens now most vulnerable
The profound threat of future climate change to biodiversity demands that scientists seek ever more effective ways to identify the most vulnerable species, communities, and ecosystems.

Blood test identifies risk of disease linked to stroke and dementia
A UCLA-led study has found that levels of six proteins in the blood can be used to gauge a person's risk for cerebral small vessel disease, a brain disease that affects an estimated 11 million older adults in the U.S.
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