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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 05, 2020


Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons.
Protein could offer therapeutic target for breast cancer metastasis
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a protein known as heat shock protein 47 could be key for suppressing breast cancer metastasis.
Study provides new understanding of mitochondria genome with potential for new avenues of treatment for multiple cancers
A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center furthered understanding about mitochondria, the cell components known as the 'powerhouse of the cell.' Knowing more about the genome is crucial given that mitochondria play important roles in tumorigenesis.
Wasp nests used to date ancient Kimberley rock art
Mud wasp nests collected from Kimberley sites with the permission of traditional owners help scientists establish ancient art rock unique to the area is 12,000 years old not 17,000 years old
Fiber crossings ahead: Key enzymes affecting nervous system pathway identified
University of Tsukuba researchers found the absence of enzymes key for corticospinal tract guidance, Sulf1 and Sulf2, results in abnormal anatomy of the corticospinal tract and impairments in fine motor function.
Association of parent, family stressors with screen exposure among toddlers
This population-based study explored associations between parent and family stressors, such as parenting stress and lower household income, with child screen exposure and screen use paired with feeding in toddlers.
Study: Higher opioid doses fail to lessen pain
Researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs and three universities looked at prescribing data on more than 50,000 VA patients taking opioids and found that increased doses did not improve pain control.
Army scientists look inside batteries with a molecular eye
Scientists are closer to understanding exactly what happens inside batteries that make them prone to fire, thanks to a molecular eye of sorts.
Sediment loading key to predicting post-wildfire debris flows
The mudslides that follow wildfires in Southern California can be deadly and difficult to predict.
Bumble bees prefer a low-fat diet
Are bees dying of malnourishment? Professor Sara Diana Leonhardt examines the interactions between plants and insects with her work group at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan.
Community health worker program yields $2.47 for every $1 invested annually by Medicaid
Every dollar spent on patients receiving support from Penn Medicine's community health worker (CHW) program resulted in an annual return on investment (ROI) of $2.47 for every dollar invested annually by Medicaid, according to a new study published online today in Health Affairs.
Global cooling after nuclear war would harm ocean life
A nuclear war that cooled Earth could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, according to the first study of its kind.
Forest soils recovering from effects of acid rain
Study shows improvement of soils and streams in the southern Appalachians.
First-of-its-kind study examines toll of nuclear war on world's oceans
A new study reveals a previously unknown cost of nuclear war -- shifts in ocean chemistry that could have serious consequences for the world's coral reefs and other marine life.
A close-up look at mutated DNA in cancer cells
PCAWG, the largest cancer research consortium in the world, has set itself the task of improving our understanding of genetic mutations in tumors.
Lung cancer rates are rising in young women across multiple countries
An International Journal of Cancer study that examined lung cancer rates in young adults in 40 countries across five continents uncovered a trend of higher lung cancer rates in women compared with men in recent years.
Healthy habits still vital after starting blood pressure, cholesterol medications
Heart-healthy lifestyle habits are always recommended whether blood pressure or cholesterol medications are prescribed or not, yet many patients let healthy habits slip after starting the prescription drugs.
Keeping a stiff upper lip can hurt your health following death of a loved one
Some people facing the loss of a loved one try to maintain their composure, but it's healthier to ditch the stiff upper lip and freely express your emotions, according to a new study from Rice University.
Chromothripsis in human cancer
Newly discovered mutational phenomenon chromothripsis is prevalent across more cancers than previously thought.
Colossal oysters have disappeared from Florida's 'most pristine' coastlines
Oysters have gotten smaller, resulting in economic and environmental concerns.
New therapy option identified for early-stage breast cancer
Radionuclide therapy has been successful in delaying the growth of disseminated tumor cells in early-stage breast cancer.
Astronomers reveal rare double nucleus in nearby 'Cocoon Galaxy'
Iowa State astronomers have revealed that a well-known, nearby galaxy has a rare double-nucleus structure.
Dementia may reduce likelihood of a 'good death' for patients with cancer
As the population ages, the number of cancer patients with dementia has increased.
Roll up
For decades, carbon nanotubes held great promise of developments in the field of electronics and more.
Social media content matters for job candidates, researchers find
According to researchers at Penn State, job recruiters are less likely to select candidates who appear to be too self-involved or opinionated in their social media posts.
Study catalogues cancer 'fingerprints' in decade-long global effort to map cancer genomes
A global research collaboration, led by world class institutions in Singapore, the UK and the USA, has developed the most detailed catalogue of mutational fingerprints found in most types of cancers that could help clarify their developmental history and lead to new prevention and treatment strategies.
Gene variants provide insight into brain, body incongruence in transgender
Some of the first biological evidence of the incongruence transgender individuals experience, because their brain indicates they are one sex and their body another, may have been found in estrogen receptor pathways in the brain of 30 transgender individuals.
CIGSe thin-film solar cells: EU Sharc25 project increases efficiency
Thin-film solar cells made of copper, indium, gallium, and selenium (CIGSe) are cost-effective to produce and now achieve efficiencies of significantly more than 20%.
USC scientists advance better imaging tool to study disease
USC scientists have developed a new tool to peer more deeply and clearly into living things so science can be used to develop better diagnostics and treatments, including detecting lung cancer or damage from pollutants.
Nanoparticles produced from burning coal result in damage to mice lungs
Titanium oxide found in coal smog and ash can cause lung damage in mice after a single exposure, with long-term damage occurring in just six weeks.
Focus on context diminishes memory of negative events, researchers report
In a new study, researchers report they can manipulate how the brain encodes and retains emotional memories.
Is it possible to reduce political polarization?
In the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election, an unusual experiment suggested that it might be possible to influence American voters to adopt less polarized positions.
Energy choices can be contagious -- but why?
A growing body of research shows that the behavior of peers can significantly influence an individual's energy-related decisions, but why that occurs is less clear.
Incarceration of a family member during childhood associated with diabetes in men
Men who experienced a family member's incarceration are 64% more likely to have diabetes in later adulthood, compared to those who were not exposed to this childhood adversity, report researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Alabama in a recent study in SAGE-Open Medicine.
Novel intervention in senior housing communities increases resilience and wisdom
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Mather Institute, developed a method to enhance resilience and reduce subjective stress in residents living in senior housing communities.
Astronomers discover unusual monster galaxy in the very early universe
An international team of astronomers led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found an unusual monster galaxy that existed about 12 billion years ago, when the universe was only 1.8 billion years old. Dubbed XMM-2599, the galaxy formed stars at a high rate and then died.
Wilderness Medical Society issues important new clinical practice guidelines
The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) has released new clinical practice guidelines in a supplement to Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier.
Traces of immortality in tumor DNA
To gain an infinite lifespan, cancer cells need to maintain the ends of their chromosomes, known as telomeres.
Treating obesity benefits children's mental health
Treating obesity in children and adolescents improves self-esteem and body image, according to an analysis of all relevant studies published to date.
ALMA catches beautiful outcome of stellar fight
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which ESO is a partner, have spotted a peculiar gas cloud that resulted from a confrontation between two stars.
Are there racial/ethnic disparities in treatment for acne?
Whether there are differences in treatment of acne by race/ethnicity, sex and type of insurance was the focus of this observational study that analyzed treatment and prescribing patterns for acne for nearly 30,000 patients.
Induced flaws in metamaterials can produce useful textures and behavior
A new Tel Aviv University study shows how induced defects in metamaterials -- artificial materials the properties of which are different from those in nature -- also produce radically different consistencies and behaviors.
Research brief: Ocean temperatures impact Central American climate more than once thought
In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, UNLV researchers and colleagues at Indiana State University, the University of Venice, and other institutions examined the rainfall history of Central America over the last 11,000 years.
Choosing common pain relievers: It's complicated
About 29 million Americans use over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain.
What's your brand?
Researchers created an algorithm that successfully predicted consumer purchases. The algorithm made use of data from the consumers' daily activity on social media.
Examining patterns after shift to reference pricing for drugs
An economic evaluation of 3.3 million drug insurance claims looked at whether implementing reference pricing was associated with physicians and patients adjusting to using the least expensive alternative within a drug class.
Researchers revise timing of Easter island's societal collapse
The prehistoric collapse of Easter Island's monument-building society did not occur as long thought, according to a fresh look at evidence by researchers at four institutions.
Faster than a speeding bullet: Asian hornet invasion spreads to Northern Germany
Known to prey on many insects, including honey bees and other beneficiary species, the Asian hornet, which had recently invaded parts of Europe, presents a serious threat to apiculture and even to ecosystems.
Majority of veterans with GWI report moderate/severe fatigue, sleep, and pain symptoms
An online survey of nearly 500 veterans with Gulf War illness (GWI) suggests a high burden of disease almost three decades after the conflict.
Fecal excretion of PFAS by pets
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are used in a wide range of consumer products, from pizza boxes to carpets to non-stick cookware.
Controlling light with light
Researchers from Harvard have developed a new platform for all-optical computing, meaning computations done solely with beams of light.
A gold butterfly can make its own semiconductor skin
A nanoscale gold butterfly provides a more precise route for growing/synthesizing nanosized semiconductors that can be used in nano-lasers and other applications.
Does tramadol increase hip fracture risk?
An analysis published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research reveals that use of the pain medication tramadol was linked with a higher risk of hip fractures compared with the use of other pain medications in an analysis of a patient database from the United Kingdom.
Solitary confinement significantly increases post-prison death risk
Even just a few days of solitary confinement may significantly increase inmates' risk of death after serving their sentences.
Researchers brighten path for creating new type of MRI contrast agent
University of Texas at Dallas researchers are breathing new life into an old MRI contrast agent by attaching it to a plant virus and wrapping it in a protective chemical cage.
Do elevated mercury levels in the blood increase skin cancer risk?
Higher levels of mercury in the blood were linked with a higher prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most common human malignancy, in a study published in the British Journal of Dermatology.
Fastest high-precision 3D printer
3D printers working in the millimeter range and larger are increasingly used in industrial production processes.
Thwarting hacks by thinking like the humans behind them
Research from Michigan State University reveals the importance of pinpointing a hacker's motive to predict, identify and prevent cyberattacks.
Not all in-home drinking water filters completely remove toxic PFAS
A new study by scientists at Duke University and North Carolina State University finds that -- while using any drinking water filter is better than using none -- many in-home water filters are only partially effective at removing toxic perfluoroalkyl substances, commonly known as PFAS.
Self-perception of aging may affect the prognosis of older patients with cancer
Self-perception of aging -- or attitudes toward one's aging experience -- may affect older individuals' risk of dying early after being diagnosed with cancer, according to results from a study published in Cancer Medicine.
A new substance prevents vascular calcification
The calcification of blood vessels and other soft tissues is problematic.
Bending diamond at the nanoscale
A team of Australian scientists has discovered diamond can be bent and deformed, at the nanoscale at least.
Putting a finger on plant stress response
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that a PHD zinc finger-like domain in SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 is essential for protein function in Arabidopsis.
MOF@hollow mesoporous carbon spheres as bifunctional electrocatalysts
A recent work presents a facile in-situ growth method for the rational synthesis of MOFs@hollow mesoporous carbon spheres (HMCS) yolk-shell structured hybrid material for the first time.
Finding genetic cancer risks
As part of the Pan-Cancer project, EMBL scientists have examined whole patient and cancer genomes in the search for genetic factors that influence cancer development.
Analysis of human genomes in the cloud
Scientists from EMBL present a tool for large-scale analysis of genomic data with cloud computing.
Improving adhesives for wearable sensors
By conveniently and painlessly collecting data, wearable sensors create many new possibilities for keeping tabs on the body.
Novelty speeds up learning thanks to dopamine activation
Brain scientists led by Sebastian Haesler (NERF, empowered by IMEC, KU Leuven and VIB) have identified a causal mechanism of how novel stimuli promote learning.
Crystal-stacking process can produce new materials for high-tech devices
Stacking ultrathin complex oxide single-crystal layers allows researchers to create new structures with hybrid properties and multiple functions.
Medical marijuana laws may affect workers' compensation claims
New research published in Health Economics indicates that after US states passed medical marijuana laws, workers' compensation claims declined.
Gluten- and casein-free diets found not to affect behavior of autistic children
The study, conducted by the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Granada, involved more than 50 children diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorders
NYUAD researchers design proteins that can be utilized to combat Alzheimer's disease
A team of researchers, led by NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Biology Mazin Magzoub, has developed small proteins called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) that prevent the aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer's disease.
Researchers identify commonly overlooked key attributes of effective leaders
Two leadership experts looked at the underlying processes that contribute to leaders' decision-making and behavior: their mindsets
Regioselective functionalization of perylenes reduces voltage loss in organic solar cells
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science and Shizuoka University in Japan report that regioselective bay-functionalization of perylene derivatives and the use of the synthesized perylene diimide (PDI) as an acceptor material reduces the open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells (OSCs).
Parkinson's and the immune system
Mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of hereditary forms of Parkinson's disease.
Can ionic liquids transform chemistry?
Table salt is a commonplace ingredient in the kitchen, but a different kind of salt is at the forefront of chemistry innovation.
Activating immune cells could revitalize the aging brain, study suggests
Researchers at Albany Medical College in New York have discovered that a specific type of immune cell accumulates in older brains, and that activating these cells improves the memory of aged mice.
Not all hormone therapy protects equally against heart disease in postmenopausal women
Hormone therapy has proven to slow down heart fat deposition and the progression of atherosclerosis, depending on the type of hormone therapy and route of administration.
Certain meditation strategies may help perfectionists
Mindfulness meditation with a focus on nonjudgment of emotions may help perfectionists recover from stress, according to a study published in Psychophysiology.
Diversity on city councils increases noninfrastructure spending -- for better or worse
When city councils are elected by district rather than at large, spending on noninfrastructure projects increases, and the impact is not necessarily good, according to new research from a Rice University economist.
Tumor secreted ANGPTL2 facilitates recruitment of neutrophils to the lung to promote lung pre-metastatic niche formation and targeting ANGPTL2 signaling affects metastatic disease
The authors determined that tumor-derived ANGPTL2 stimulates lung epithelial cells, which is essential for primary tumor-induced neutrophil recruitment in lung and subsequent pre-metastatic niche formation.
Re-engineered plant compound treats opioid addiction in mice
The abuse of prescription and illegal opioids, such as morphine and heroin, is a major problem in the US, with devastating public health, economic and social consequences.
Medical students become less empathic toward patients throughout medical school
The nationwide, multi-institutional cross-sectional study of students at DO-granting medical schools found that those students -- like their peers in MD-granting medical schools -- lose empathy as they progress through medical school.
Helping discover the diversity in soil
Microbiological communities reveal a great deal of information about the state of soils.
Treating wastewater with ozone could convert pharmaceuticals into toxic compounds
With water scarcity intensifying, wastewater treatment and reuse are gaining popularity.
Targeting the cancer microenvironment
The recognition of bacterial infections or foreign substances is mediated and controlled by the human immune system.
Studying DNA rearrangement to understand cancer
Using the dataset from the Pan-Cancer project, a team including EMBL scientists has developed methods to group, classify, and describe structural variants -- large rearrangements of the genome that are a key driver of cancer.
Bumblebees carry heavy loads in economy mode
Bumblebees are the big lifters of the insect world, able to fly back to the hive with almost their own bodyweight in nectar on board.
Less advertising for high-calorie snacks on children's TV
The number of overweight children has increased significantly. Some food and beverage companies have signed a voluntary commitment at EU level to restrict advertising of foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children.
First comprehensive survey of virus DNA found within cancer cells
Researchers have carried out the first comprehensive survey of viruses found within different types of cancer.
Prehistoric skeleton discovered in Southern Mexico
A prehistoric human skeleton found in southern Mexico is at least 10,000 years old and most likely dates from the end of the most recent ice age.
The invisibility cloak of a fungus
The human immune system can easily recognize fungi because their cells are surrounded by a solid cell wall of chitin and other complex sugars.
NYU scientists sequence the genome of basmati rice
Using an innovative genome sequencing technology, researchers assembled the complete genetic blueprint of two basmati rice varieties, including one that is drought-tolerant and resistant to bacterial disease.
Improving AI's ability to identify students who need help
Researchers have designed an artificial intelligence (AI) model that is better able to predict how much students are learning in educational games.
Cancer mutations occur decades before diagnosis
A large-scale pan-cancer analysis of the evolutionary history of tumours reveals that cancer-causing mutations occur decades before diagnosis.
Proposed hydropower dams pose threat to Gabon's fishes
Proposed hydropower dams in Gabon pose a substantial threat to the African nation's most culturally and economically important fishes, according to a new study.
Autism screening rate soars with use of CHICA system developed by Regenstrief and IU
Universal early screening for autism is recommended for all children but is not routinely performed.
Direct touch of food makes eating experience more enjoyable
When high self-control individuals touch food directly with their hands (vs. indirectly with a utensil), they not only experience it as tastier and more satisfying, but they eat more of it.
Earlier detection of women's vascular health issues can affect heart disease risk
Men and women differ in the way their vascular systems age and the rate at which atherosclerosis -- the hardening of artery walls or buildup of arterial blockage -- progresses over time.
Unveiling how lymph nodes regulate immune response
The Hippo pathway keeps lymph nodes' development healthy. If impaired, lymph nodes become full of fat cells or fibrosis develops.
Cathode 'defects' improve battery performance
Chemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have made a new finding about battery performance that points to a different strategy for optimizing cathode materials.
How manipulating ligand interactions in metal clusters can spur advances in nanotechnology
Ligand-protected metal clusters in assembled structures show peculiar properties, which are different from those of corresponding bulk metals.
Fruit flies respond to rapid changes in the visual environment
Researchers have discovered a mechanism employed by the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster that broadens our understanding of visual perception.
Unprecedented exploration generates most comprehensive map of cancer genomes to date
An international team has completed the most comprehensive study of whole cancer genomes to date, significantly improving our fundamental understanding of cancer and signposting new directions for its diagnosis and treatment.
Does abdominal fat affect the cognitive function of older adults with diabetes?
Higher levels of abdominal fat were linked with reduced cognitive function in a Clinical Obesity study of older Asians with type 2 diabetes -- even in individuals with normal weight.
The economic burden of kidney transplant failure in the United States
A recent analysis published in the American Journal of Transplantation estimates that for the average US patient who has undergone kidney transplantation, failure of the transplanted organ (graft failure) will impose additional medical costs of $78,079 and a loss of 1.66 quality-adjusted life years.
Paternal involvement might improve health of mom, infant
Unmarried women are less likely to have prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy, to ever breastfeed, to breastfeed at least eight weeks and are more likely to drink alcohol and smoke during and after pregnancy.
NASA satellite observes Tropical Storm Francisco's formation
Shortly after Tropical Cyclone Francisco formed on Feb. 5, 2020 in the Southern Indian Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm.
UT team develops model to predict hernia surgery recovery outcomes
Could patients experience less pain and possibly have better recovery outcomes if their fears or emotional issues were addressed before surgery?
Programmed vascular endothelium remodeling using a remote-controlled 'smart' platform
Vascular regeneration is of high significance in cardiovascular disease treatment, while it remains challenging due to the difficulty of endothelialization.
Study links three key variables to higher rural mortality rates in US
Since the 1980s, the all-cause mortality rate for rural residents in the US has exceeded that of urban residents.
Scientists learn more about the first hours of a lithium-ion battery's life
The first hours of a lithium-ion battery's life largely determine just how well it will perform.
The shape of water: What water molecules look like on the surface of materials
Water is a familiar substance that is present virtually everywhere.
Study identifies potential risk factors for cognitive decline in older adults
New findings published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society may eventually point to different strategies for preventing cognitive decline in different groups of older adults.
Increased traffic injuries are a surprising result of restricting older drivers
Research from Japan's University of Tsukuba examined impacts of mandated cognitive testing at driver's license renewal for people aged 75+.
Fireproof, lightweight solid electrolyte for safer lithium-ion batteries
Lithium-ion batteries are in everything from cell phones to cars.
Retinoid X receptor boosts brain recovery after stroke in preclinical trial
A regulator of gene expression, retinoid X receptor (RXR), can boost scavenging cells in their mission to clear the brain of dead cells and debris after a stroke, thus limiting inflammation and improving recovery, according to preclinical research led by Jarek Aronowski, M.D., Ph.D., of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
Characterising RNA alterations in cancer
The largest and most comprehensive catalogue of cancer-specific RNA alterations reveals new insights into the cancer genome.
Viruses and cancer -- systematic overview published
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center systematically investigated the DNA of more than 2,600 tumor samples from patients with 38 different types of cancer to discover traces of viruses -- which they found in 13% of the samples studied.
The benefits of physical activity for older adults
New findings published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports reveal how physically active older adults benefit from reduced risks of early death, breast and prostate cancer, fractures, recurrent falls, functional limitations, cognitive decline, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and depression.
High-precision imaging revealed what holds on the smallest light responsive gold chain
Manufacture of chemical sensors and catalysts based on gold nanoclusters gained new light from recent cutting-edge research.
Development of the immune system varies according to age, location and anaemia
Age and geographical location have the strongest influence on immune composition and vaccine responses, with anaemia having a considerable effect, according to a study co-led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), the Babraham Institute and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with the Manhiça Health Research Center (CISM).
Waterbug from european rivers found in the Iberian Peninsula
Aphelocheirus aestivalis, a waterbug found in mid and high sections of well-oxygenated and preserved rivers in the European continent, has been found for the first time in Catalonia (Spain)-specifically in rivers Ter and Llobregat- according to an article published in the journal Limnetica.
Researcher's technology differentiates between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy
Scientists have found a way to distinguish between two progressive neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), using a technology developed by a researcher at UTHealth.
Excessive sports in case of eating disorders: Psychological mechanisms decoded
Excessive and obsessive exercise is very harmful to health, particularly for persons suffering from eating disorders.
An end-to-end general framework for automatic diagnosis of manufacturing systems
A framework, derived from convolutional neural network, is proposed to diagnosis and monitoring performances in diverse manufacturing applications.
Extreme difficulty breathing and swallowing linked to teen's vaping?
After a teen was transferred to Children's National Hospital suffering from severe difficulty breathing and swallowing, a multidisciplinary team continued the detective work and surmises that vaping was to blame for her unusual symptoms.
Why males pack a powerful punch
Elk have antlers. Rams have horns. In the animal kingdom, males develop specialized weapons for competition when winning a fight is critical.
Scientists find common approach to self-organization problem
An international group of scientists, with the participation of University of Tyumen (UTMN), has presented an overview of cluster systems research, offering a fresh and generalized approach to the problem of self-organization.
Scientists identify new genetic drivers of cancer
Analysis of whole cancer genomes gives key insights into the role of the non-coding genome in cancer.
Landscape-level surveys are necessary to address large-scale wildlife losses from poaching
Widespread poaching in tropical biodiversity hotspots is causing unprecedented declines in wildlife populations, known as defaunation.
A 3D study of a tiny beetle that attacks the fruits of coffee reveals details of its anatomy and secret life that can help fight this pest
Scientists from the University of Granada, thanks to microtomography techniques, reveal secret, and until now unknown, aspects of tunnel construction strategies, and how to exploit the fruit, in addition to the internal structures of a tiny beetle known as the 'coffee berry borer.'
New study provides criteria for good infant sleep for the first time
According to a new study, sleep problems among infants are very common and normally improve by the time the child reaches the age of 2.
Study reveals seasonal variations in hypertensive disorders during pregnancy
Researchers observed seasonal variations in the risk of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy -- including gestational hypertension and preeclampsia -- in a Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica study of Danish women.
Scientists document collapse of key Central American forest engineer
White-lipped peccaries have declined by as much as 87% to 90% from their historical range in Central America, signaling a population collapse of a key species in the region.
Ultracold gases in time-dependent magnetic fields
Zk Noor Nabi from Zhejiang University, China and co-workers from the Indian Institute of Technology studied the phase transition between the Mott insulating (MI) and superfluid (SF) states of an ultracold gas in a time-dependent magnetic field.
Gut bacteria help control healthy muscle contraction in the colon
Micro-organisms in the gut support healthy digestion by helping nerve cells within the intestine to regulate the contraction and relaxation of the muscle wall of the colon, according to new research from the Crick and Bern University.
Short, intensive training improves children's health
Many children don't get enough exercise and as a result often have health problems such as being overweight and having high blood pressure.

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