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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 13, 2020


Acid reflux drug is a surprising candidate to curb preterm birth
Lansoprazole, an over-the-counter acid reflux drug that is often taken by pregnant women, may be a promising therapy to reduce preterm birth, according to a computational drug repurposing study that also tested several of the drugs in mice.
Second antibiotic no advantage for treating super-bug Golden Staph
A world-first clinical trial has called into question the effectiveness of using more than one antibiotic to treat the deadly 'super-bug', Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteremia, commonly known as Golden Staph.
Pitt study uncovers new electronic state of matter
The discovery shows that when electrons can be made to attract one another, they can form bunches of two, three, four and five electrons that behave like new types of particles.
Heat transport property at the lowermost part of the Earth's mantle
Lattice thermal conductivities of MgSiO3 bridgmanite and postperovskite (PPv) phases under the Earth's deepest mantle conditions were determined by quantum mechanical computer simulations.
Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys
The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists.
Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons
A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution - but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction.
New, detailed molecular roadmap boosts fight against endometrial cancer
Scientists have taken an unprecedented look at the proteins involved in endometrial cancer, commonly known as uterine cancer.
Clinical practice guideline approval process introduces potential conflicts of interest
A new study of the approval processes used by the 43 medical-specialty-society members of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies in the US to create evidence-based guidelines finds that most use an approval procedure that has the potential to undermine editorial independence of the guideline development committee.
Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures
The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated the use of new spin structures for future magnetic storage devices has yet achieved another milestone.
Autophagy degrades liquid droplets, but not aggregates, of proteins
Autophagy is a mechanism through which cellular protein is degraded.
Fewer veterans dying or requiring amputations for critically blocked leg arteries
Between 2005 and 2014, there was a significant decline in the number of veterans hospitalized for critically blocked leg arteries.
Capillary shrinkage triggers high-density porous structure
The capillary shrinkage of graphene oxide hydrogels was investigated to illustrate the relationship between the surface tension of the evaporating solvent and the associated capillary force, which was released by Quan-Hong Yang et al. in Science China Materials.
Shaping waveforms
Researchers have succeeded for the first time in temporally shaping the electric field of an attosecond pulse.
Oceans: particle fragmentation plays a major role in carbon sequestration
A French-British team has just discovered that a little known process regulates the capacity of oceans to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2).
Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness
In a new discovery, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have detected widespread inflammation in the brains of veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Illness.
Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient.
Cigarette prices have risen following standardised packaging, despite warnings
New study highlights how the introduction of minimum excise tax and the advent of 'plain packs' for cigarettes in the UK has seen prices rise.
Electric solid propellant -- can it take the heat?
Electric solid propellants are being explored as a safer option for pyrotechnics, mining, and in-space propulsion because they only ignite with an electric current.
Study: Text messaging an effective tool to improve access to prenatal health information
Pregnant urban African American and immigrant Afro-Caribbean women are more likely to receive the prenatal health information they need if they are given access to mhealth apps like Text4baby.
Scientists propose new properties in hollow multishell structure
A new study led by Prof. WANG Dan from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposes a novel concept of temporal-spatial ordering and dynamic smart behavior in HoMSs.
Improving protection of wildlife in national parks
Researchers call for uniform regulations to manage wild animals in European national parks.
Molecular switch mechanism explains how mutations shorten biological clocks
A new study of molecular interactions central to the functioning of biological clocks explains how certain mutations can shorten clock timing, making some people extreme 'morning larks' because their internal clocks operate on a 20-hour cycle instead of being synchronized with the 24-hour cycle of day and night.
Method combination allows deep insights into ultrafast light-induced processes
Researchers from Graz University of Technology and the University of Vienna are demonstrating for the first time how the energy flow between strongly interacting molecular states can be better described.
Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking.
Ceramides predict vascular brain injury and dementia
In a study published in Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, a team led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital describes the role of plasma ceramides in dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their potential as a blood-based biomarker.
Study: Bariatric surgeries can double peak blood alcohol levels, patients may be unaware
Two popular forms of bariatric surgery may dramatically change women's sensitivity to and absorption of alcohol - but patients may be unaware, according to research led by professor of food science and human nutrition M.
Fake news makes disease outbreaks worse, research shows
The rise of fake news could be making disease outbreaks worse -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Consider workplace AI's impact before it's too late, study says
The paper, ''Beyond Design and Use: How Scholars Should Study Intelligent Design Technologies,'' states that scholars and policymakers need to start thinking about it far more broadly if they want to have a say in what the future looks like.
University of Notre Dame-developed home lead screening kits shown to be highly accurate
An inexpensive lead sample collection kit distributed to homes in St.
Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery
New research from University of Colorado Boulder reveals that even simultaneous bark beetle outbreaks are not a death sentence to the state's beloved forests.
How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins
A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging.
From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: cost-efficient and more sustainable
An interdisciplinary team of bio-engineers and economists from KU Leuven has mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry.
Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app
A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed -- and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for 'rapid action' action on.
Transparent human organs allow 3D maps at the cellular level
For the first time, researchers managed to make intact human organs transparent.
The demise of tropical snakes, an 'invisible' outcome of biodiversity loss
That tropical amphibian populations have been crippled by the chytrid fungus is well-known, but a new study linking this loss to an 'invisible' decline of tropical snake communities suggests that the permeating impacts of the biodiversity crisis are not as apparent.
The curious case of the disappearing snakes
A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study featured on the cover of this week's Science magazine should sound alarm bells regarding the ''biodiversity crisis'' or the loss of wildlife around the world.
Immune cells consult with neighbors to make decisions
Researchers have uncovered new evidence that immune cells count their neighbors before deciding whether or not the immune system should kick into high gear.
Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness
A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study.
Brain imaging study reveals new clues about PTSD in victims of terrorist attacks
A new study published in Science suggests new therapeutic avenues for PTSD patients, after researchers explored the brainq of victims of the November 13, 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.
Per-Person Health Care Spending Grew 18% from 2014 to 2018, Driven Mostly by Prices
Average employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) spending rose to $5,892 per person in 2018, according to the Health Care Cost Institute's annual Health Care Cost and Utilization Report, which analyzes 2.5 billion medical claims to inform the public about trends affecting approximately 160 million US individuals with employer-sponsored insurance.
Artificial intelligence finds disease-related genes
An artificial neural network can reveal patterns in huge amounts of gene expression data, and discover groups of disease-related genes.
Simple N-terminal modification of proteins
Osaka University researchers report efficient one-step modification of protein N termini using functional molecules containing 1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carbaldehyde (TA4C) groups.
Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'
In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing on the seafloor.
Protecting pipelines during land movements
Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a cost-effective and practical method to protect pipelines and keep them operating during significant fault rupture incidents and large ground movements.
California agricultural employers, workers approach smoke concerns differently
A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds that while wildfires and smoke exposure are recognized by farmworkers and employers as a growing threat and safety concern, the means to address these concerns differs between the two groups.
Smelling your lover's shirt could improve your sleep
The scent of a romantic partner can improve sleep, suggests new psychology research from the University of British Columbia.
When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets
A new study in the journal Science, shows that the snake community become more homogenized and the number of species declined dramatically after chytrid fungus decimated frog populations in a remote forest in Panama.
UIC researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells
Researchers have discovered that endothelial cells have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body.
Polymers to the rescue! Saving cells from damaging ice
Research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by University of Utah chemists Pavithra Naullage and Valeria Molinero provides the foundation to design efficient polymers that can prevent the growth of ice that damages cells.
New Brazilian study describes neural inflammatory processes in lab-developed human cells
Astrocytes are neural cells with many important functions in the nervous system.
'Quit vaping searches increased during lung-disease outbreak
Researchers found that searches on such terms as ''quit vaping'' increased as much as 3.7-fold during the vaping-related illness outbreak.
Factors associated with health-related quality of life in patients with facial palsy
Patients with facial palsy completed questionnaires to help identify socioeconomic, personality and mental health factors associated with their health-related quality of life, information that may be beneficial in interpreting treatment outcomes.
Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity
Scientists have developed an energy harvesting device that generates over 5 volts of electricity from a liquid droplet.
Face-to-face contact with police builds trust in fledgling states
The paper, ''Relational State Building in Areas of Limited Statehood: Experimental Evidence on the Attitudes of the Police,'' finds that personal contact between police officers and citizens encourages a positive attitude about the country's central authority because such relationships provide information and facilitate social bonds.
Children miss more school when their mothers experience high physical violence
A new study published in Maternal and Child Health Journal, led by Anna M.
New process for preserving lumber could offer advantages over pressure treating
Researchers have developed a new method that could one day replace conventional pressure treating as a way to make lumber not only fungal-resistant but also nearly impervious to water -- and more thermally insulating.
Computer-based weather forecast: New algorithm outperforms mainframe computer systems
The exponential growth in computer processing power seen over the past 60 years may soon come to a halt.
One's internal clock could be targeted to prevent or slow the progression of breast cancer
City of Hope scientists have identified an unlikely way to potentially prevent or slow the progression of aggressive breast cancer: target one's internal clock.
'Rosetta stone' for urban scaling makes sense of how cities change across time and space
New work reconciles divergent methods used to analyze the scaling behavior of cities.
Predicting autism risk may begin with a drop of blood
A novel research study by UC San Diego researchers will determine whether testing stored blood drops, recorded at birth, for 1,000 different molecules and chemicals can help predict autism risk years before symptoms would likely appear.
Research calls for graphic warning labels to be added to cigarette packages
Experts at the Center for Tobacco Research and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center are making a case for why the U.S.
UConn biomedical engineer creates 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds
A new 'smart bandage' developed at UConn could help improve clinical care for people with chronic wounds.
How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime
During human embryonic development, a small pool of germ cells that will eventually become gametes is set aside, and all sperm or eggs that humans produce during their lives are the descendants of those original few germ cells.
I spy with my digital eye ... a tiger's breathing, a lion's pulse
A pilot study undertaken by researchers from the University of South Australia at Adelaide Zoo, has developed a new way to undertake basic health checks of exotic wildlife using a digital camera, saving them the stress of an anaesthetic.
Kisspeptin hormone injection can boost brain activity associated with attraction
The hormone kisspeptin can enhance brain activity associated with attraction, according to a new study.
Organic photovoltaic cell with 17% efficiency and superior processability for large-area coating
The research group from the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, led by Prof.
Hydropower dams cool rivers in the Mekong River basin, satellites show
Using 30 years of satellite data, UW researchers discovered that within one year of the opening of a major dam in the Mekong River basin, downstream river temperatures during the dry season dropped by up to 3.6 degrees F (2 degrees C).
Babies mimic songs, study finds
Researchers -- and parents -- have long known that babies learn to speak by mimicking the words they hear.
Caribbean sharks in need of large marine protected areas
Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) PhD Candidate, Oliver Shipley.
Researchers uncover the moscow subway microbiome
Recently, a group of ITMO University researchers has looked into the microbiome of the Moscow Subway.
70% of Americans rarely discuss the environmental impact of their food
American consumers are hungry for more climate-friendly plant-based diets, but they need more information, according to a new survey by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the Earth Day Network.
Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes
Mathematical modeling helps researchers to understand how enzymes in the body work to ensure normal functioning.
Timing of brain cell death uncovers a new target for Alzheimer's treatment
Alzheimer's disease affects millions of people worldwide and is characterized by neuron loss and beta-amyloid plaque formation in the brain.
Mending a broken heart -- the bioengineering way
Bioengineers from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have developed a prototype patch that does the same job as crucial aspects of heart tissue.
Can beauty be-er ignored?
This Valentine's Day, psychologists from Edge Hill University explore the science behind the 'beer goggles' effect and suggests there is some truth to this when considering the attractiveness of potential suitors.
Fewer liquor stores may lead to less homicide
Reducing the number of businesses in Baltimore that sell alcohol in urban residential areas may lower the homicide rate, according to new research.
Tourists pose continued risks for disease transmission to endangered mountain gorillas
Researchers at Ohio University have published a new study in collaboration with Ugandan scientists, cautioning that humans place endangered mountain gorillas at risk of disease transmission during tourism encounters.
How early life trauma can contribute to functional neurological disorder
Findings may provide a better understanding of what happens in the brains of some patients with FND, as well as those with various other trauma-related brain disorders.
UH Law center professors urge tighter controls on data held by health tech companies
University of Houston Law Center Professors Jim Hawkins and Jessica L.
Novel targeted drug shows promise in advanced kidney cancer
Scientists report promising activity of a novel drug that targets a key molecular driver of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) in patients with metastatic disease.
Unilateral terms of service change may put health-tech consumer welfare at risk
Given the intimate nature of the data handled by health technology companies, Jessica Roberts and Jim Hawkins argue, in this Policy Forum, for stronger consumer protections.
Mechanism of controlling autophagy by liquid-liquid phase separation revealed
Japanese scientists elucidated characteristics of PAS through observing the Atg protein using a fluorescence microscope and successfully reconstituted PAS in vitro.
Kazan University's telescope assists in discovering a binary star system
In this article, a group of Polish scientists, based on international cooperative observations and their own theoretical calculations, built a geometric picture of the occurrence of the Gaia16aye microlensing phenomenon.
Studying electrons, bridging two realms of physics: connecting solids and soft matter
Condensed matter physics, which analyzes the behavior of electrons in organized solid matter, has been treated as a completely separate field of study from soft matter physics, which deals with liquids, gels, etc.
E-cigarette use among teens may be higher than previously thought, study finds
Juul may have influenced high school students' perception of vaping such that some Juul users do not consider themselves e-cigarette users, a Rutgers-led study finds.
Romance, scent, and sleep: The stuff that dreams are made of
New research accepted for publication in the journal Psychological Science suggests that the scent of a romantic partner can improve your quality of sleep.
NASA finds wind shear affecting tropical cyclone Uesi
NASA satellite imagery revealed that vertical wind shear appears to be affecting Tropical Cyclone Uesi in the Southern Pacific Ocean.
Texas Heart Institute and UCLA reveal innovative pacing system in Scientific Reports
Researchers at Texas Heart Institute and UCLA crossed a major milestone in the development of a wirelessly powered, leadless pacemaker and further advanced the possibility of using wirelessly powered, biventricular pacing to address cardiac resynchronization challenges.
Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities
Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a revolutionary desalination process that has the potential to be operated in mobile, solar-powered units.
Fragile topology: Two new studies explain the strange electron flow in future materials
Crystalline materials known as topological insulators conduct surface current perfectly, except when they don't.
mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone
Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump -- a major climate regulator -- a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans.
10,000 steps a day: Not a magical formula for preventing weight gain
For years now, 10,000 steps a day has become the gold standard for people trying to improve their health -- and recent research shows some benefits can come from even just 7,500 steps.
Living in greener neighborhoods may postpone the natural onset of menopause
For the first time, a study led by the University of Bergen and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a centre supported by 'la Caixa', has found that living in a greener neighbourhood is associated with older age at the onset of menopause.
Scientists finally figure out how millipedes actually do it
Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery -- until now.
Genetic profile may predict type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes
Women who go on to develop type 2 diabetes after having gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes are more likely to have particular genetic profiles, suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring
University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms.
Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet
Researchers at the University of Plymouth, Natural England, the University of Exeter and the University of Derby are the first to investigate -- within a single study -- the contribution of both nature contact and connection to human health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours.
Nitrogen-fixing trees help tropical forests grow faster and store more carbon
New research published in Nature Communications shows that the ability of tropical forests to lock up carbon depends critically upon a group of trees that possess a unique talent -- the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere.
Autophagy genes act as tumor suppressors in ovarian cancer
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and University of California at San Diego report in PLOS Genetics that the loss of BECN1 promoted early ovarian cancer formation and genomic instability.
Taking a bite out of mosquito-borne disease
An innovative -- and inexpensive -- technique targets mosquito larvae where they live.
Researchers validate link between genetic variant and poor outcomes in advanced prostate cancer
In a new Cleveland Clinic-led study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers show that a testosterone-related genetic variant -- HSD3B1(1245C) -- is associated with more aggressive disease and shorter survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer.
Research pinpoints rogue cells at root of autoimmune disease
Breakthrough cellular genomics technology has allowed Garvan and UNSW Sydney researchers to reveal genetic mutations causing rogue behaviour in the cells that cause autoimmune disease.
Gentle touch loses its pleasure in migraine patients
Psychophysical data suggest that migraine patients may have abnormal affective aspects of sensorial functioning, by showing reduced sensation of pleasure associated with touch.
Very tough and essential for survival
The brains of most fish and amphibian species contain a pair of conspicuously large nerve cells.
Artificial intelligence is becoming sustainable!
A research group from Politecnico di Milano has developed a new computing circuit that can execute advanced operations, typical of neural networks for artificial intelligence, in one single operation.
Understanding how a protein wreaks havoc in the brain in Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease is a long-term (chronic) neurological condition that affects the way the brain co-ordinates body movements like walking and talking, as well as cognitive abilities.
A close-up of Arrokoth reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed
The farthest, most primitive object in the Solar System ever to be visited by a spacecraft - a bi-lobed Kuiper Belt Object known as Arrokoth -- is described in detail in three new reports.
Moving precision communication, metrology, quantum applications from lab to chip
Photonic integration has focused on communications applications traditionally fabricated on silicon chips, because these are less expensive and more easily manufactured, and researchers are exploring promising new waveguide platforms that provide these same benefits for applications that operate in the ultraviolet to the infrared spectrum.
Novel biotechnological route developed to obtain fine chemicals from agricultural waste
Preliminary calculations show that the new biotechnological route can increase the value of sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw up to 5,000-fold and multiply the price of ferulic acid by a factor of up to 75 when these residues are converted into coniferol.
Are all sources of carbohydrates created equal?
Potatoes are often equated with refined grains due to their carbohydrate content.
Kitsch religious souvenirs can rekindle pilgrimage experience
'Tacky and 'kitsch' religious souvenirs brought back from pilgrimage sites offer pilgrims and their friends and family who cannot make the journey a deeper religious connection.
Blood and sweat: Wearable medical sensors will get major sensitivity boost
Scientists explain how to increase the sensitivity of biosensors to the point where they can be integrated into smartphones, smart watches, and other wearable devices.
Scholarly journals work together to disseminate knowledge in ob-gyn
Rutgers-led study found substantial differences between top-cited ob-gyn articles that were published in non-specialty journals compared to those published in ob-gyn journals.
Much shorter radiation treatment found to be safe, effective for people with soft tissue sarcoma
A new study led by researchers at UCLA found that treating soft tissue sarcoma with radiation over a significantly shorter period of time is safe, and likely just as effective, as a much longer conventional course of treatment.
Study surveys molecular landscape of endometrial cancer
The most comprehensive molecular study of endometrial cancer to date has further defined the contributions of key genes and proteins to the disease.
State of mind: The end of personality as we know it
In a study published today researchers propose that changing states of mind are holistic in that they exert all-encompassing and coordinated effects simultaneously on our perception, attention, thought, affect, and behavior.
Feasibility of using cells from fat tissue to treat scarred vocal cords
This small trial examined the feasibility and effectiveness of injecting cells with regenerative properties that are from a patient's fat tissue into scarred vocal cords of patients who had difficulty speaking.
BU Study: State alcohol laws focus on drunk driving; they could do much more
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds a substantial increase in the number and strength of state laws to reduce impaired driving over the last 20 years, while laws to reduce excessive drinking remained unchanged.
As groundwater depletes, arid American West is moving east
Loss of groundwater may accelerate drying trends in the eastern United States, according to research that applied supercomputing to create an in-depth model of how groundwater will respond to warming.
Poop matters: Making the mouse gut microbiome more human-like
Caltech researchers find that when rodents are prevented from consuming feces, their small-intestine microbiota more closely resembles the microbial communities found in human intestines.
Benefits and barriers of prescription drug lists for asthma medications
A new study led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute examines the benefits and barriers of Prescription Drug List coverage for preventive asthma medications.
Can bilingualism protect the brain even with early stages of dementia?
A study by York University psychology researchers provides new evidence that bilingualism can delay symptoms of dementia.
New potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning identified
One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters--the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan--may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.
New gene mutation associated with Fabry cardiomyopathy
The A143T variant of the GLA gene is associated with an increased risk of Fabry cardiomyopathy, according to a new study.
Effectiveness of travel bans -- readily used during infectious disease outbreaks -- mostly unknown, study finds
While travel bans are frequently used to stop the spread of an emerging infectious disease, a new University of Washington and Johns Hopkins University study of published research found that the effectiveness of travel bans is mostly unknown.
Clinical trial examines subconcussive head impacts from soccer
Subconcussive head impacts from sports are those that don't cause symptoms of a concussion.

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