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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 24, 2020


Magnetic field at Martian surface ten times stronger than expected
New data gleaned from the magnetic sensor aboard NASA's InSight spacecraft is offering an unprecedented close-up of magnetic fields on Mars.
How the urban environment affects the diet of its citizens
In the high-impact journal Appetite the UPV/EHU's Nursing and Health Promotion research group has published a study using photovoice methodology and which qualitatively compares citizens' perceptions about the food environment in three Bilbao neighbourhoods with different socioeconomic levels.
Defects add color to quantum systems
Researchers are investigating light-emitting defects in materials that may someday form the basis of quantum-based technologies, such as quantum computers, quantum networks or engines that run on light.
Intensive behavioral therapy and liraglutide 3.0 mg show positive results for weight loss
Intensive behavioral therapy (IBT) combined with liraglutide 3.0 mg (Saxenda) can produce clinically-meaningful weight loss in patients who receive the treatment in predominantly primary care settings, according to a study published online in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
Short film of a magnetic nano-vortex
For the first time, researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have recorded a '3D film' of magnetic processes on the nanometer scale.
Many older adults face new disabilities after hospital stays for serious illnesses
Older adults often face new disabilities after a hospital stay for a serious illness.
First direct seismic measurements of mars reveal a geologically active planet
The first reports of seismic activity and ground vibrations on Mars show the red planet has a moderate level of seismic activity, intermediate between Earth and the Moon, with a few quakes that contain distinct wave patterns similar to quakes on Earth caused by the movement of tectonic plates.
"CRISPR: A Screener's Guide" headlines the March edition of SLAS Discovery
The March edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, ''CRISPR: A Screener's Guide,'' by Carlos le Sage, Ph.D., Steffen Lawo, Ph.D., and Benedict C.S.
How sleep helps teens deal with social stress
Study found that adequate sleep allowed students to cope with discrimination and challenges associated with ethnic or racial bias.
Having an eye for colors: Printable light sensors
Cameras, light barriers, and movement sensors have one thing in common: they work with light sensors that are already found in many applications.
A study of economic compensation for victims of sexual violence in Europe
A study carried out by researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the efficiency of the Spanish system of economically compensating the victims of sexual violence.
When coronavirus is not alone
Interacting contagious diseases like influenza and pneumonia--and perhaps coronavirus too -- follow the same complex spreading patterns as social trends, like the adoption of new slang or technologies.
APS tip sheet: Listening to bursting bubbles
Sound signatures from violent fluid events, like bubbles bursting, can be used to measure forces at work during these events.
COPD patients' hospital stays 67% shorter due to one additional staff meeting, study finds
The average length of stay for patients with COPD at the hospital with ICCs was 3.37 days, compared to 5.55 days in the hospital without them.
InSight detects gravity waves, devilish dust on Mars
More than a year after NASA's Mars InSight lander touched down in a pebble-filled crater on the Martian equator, the rusty red planet is now serving up its meteorological secrets: gravity waves, surface swirling ''dust devils,'' and the steady, low rumble of infrasound, Cornell and other researchers have found.
Resetting immune cells improves traumatic brain injury recovery in mice
Targeting overactive immune cells and dampening their effects may serve as a new treatment for treating a traumatic brain injury, according to new research in mice published in JNeurosci.
Targeting hibernating breast cancer cells in the lung could reduce secondary cancers
Healthy lung cells support the survival of breast cancer cells, allowing them to hibernate in the lung before forming secondary tumors, according to new research, conducted in mice, from the Crick.
Researchers analyze influenza epidemiologic supervision and children cases in Catalonia
Two studies led by the UB analyzed several aspects involved in the detection of the influenza: the utility of the definition of the illness considering clinical manifestation and complementarity of supervision systems based on severe ambulatory cases that require hospitalization in Catalonia.
Antibodies: the body's own antidepressants
Antibodies can be a blessing or a curse to the brain -- it all depends on their concentration.
Solar storms could scramble whales' navigational sense
When our sun belches out a hot stream of charged particles in Earth's general direction, it doesn't just mess up communications satellites.
'Grand Challenge' review stresses global impact of microplastics
'Grand Challenge' review, commissioned to mark AGU's 100th anniversary, stresses that microplastics are not just an ocean problem.
Valley physicians pioneer groundbreaking technology to help dialysis patients
Phoenix-area kidney specialist Randy Cooper, MD, will present his initial four-year data on a new type of dialysis access called Ellipsys at the upcoming American Society for Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology (ASDIN), February 21-23, in Las Vegas.
Researchers propose new disease classification system for obesity
Researchers are proposing a new scientifically correct and medically actionable disease classification system for obesity, according to a paper published online in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
APS tip sheet: The neutron's electric dipole moment
Techniques for studying the neutron's electrical charges have reached a new level of sensitivity.
Mirrored chip could enable handheld dark-field microscopes
Engineers at MIT have developed a small, mirrored chip that helps to produce dark-field images, without dedicated expensive components.
Ancient DNA from Sardinia reveals 6,000 years of genetic history
A new study of the genetic history of Sardinia, a Mediterranean island off the western coast of Italy, analyzed genome-wide DNA data for 70 individuals from more than 20 Sardinian archaeological sites spanning roughly 6,000 years from the Middle Neolithic through the Medieval period.
Wildfire cycles and climate change
A study led by HAN Yongming from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed a linkage between glacial cycles and inland Asian high-intensity wildfire events by analyzing high-resolution soot deposition over the last 2.6 million years.
Could this plaque identifying toothpaste prevent a heart attack or stroke?
For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body -- in particular, heart attacks and strokes.
Supplementing diet with amino acid successfully staves off signs of ALS in pre-clinical study
The addition of dietary L-serine, a naturally occurring amino acid necessary for formation of proteins and nerve cells, delayed signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in an animal study.
'Resetting' immune cells improves traumatic brain injury recovery in preclinical trials
Targeting overactive immune cells and dampening their chronic neurotoxic effects may offer new therapeutic strategies for traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to new preclinical research in mice, which has been published today.
Shining a new light on biomimetic materials
Researchers have merged optical, chemical and materials sciences to utilize light to control the local dynamic behavior within a hydrogel, much like the ability of the iris and pupil in the eye to dynamically respond to incoming light.
Hospital admission & neurological consultations associated with improved TIA care quality
Patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as mini-stroke, are at high risk of more vascular events, including repeated TIAs, stroke and death yet are less likely to be admitted to the hospital for treatment than patients with stroke.
Alcohol ads lead to youth drinking, should be more regulated, experts say
The marketing of alcoholic beverages is one cause of underage drinking, public health experts conclude.
CNIO and Cabimer researchers show that DNA topological problems may cause lymphoma
Movements and changes in 3D genome structure form knots and tangles in the DNA.
Simple blood test could help reduce heart disease deaths
Scientists at Newcastle University have revealed how a simple blood test could be used to help identify cardiovascular ageing and the risk of heart disease.
Researchers adapt cognitive assessment for people with intellectual disability
The NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery -- an assessment of cognitive functioning for adults and children participating in neuroscience research -- can be adapted to people with intellectual disabilities by modifying some test components and making accommodations for the test-takers' disabilities, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Neural cells speed up function in 3D bioprinted skeletal muscle constructs
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists improve on 3D bioprinting research by investigating the effects of neural cell integration into bioprinted muscle constructs to accelerate functional muscle regeneration.
Just as tobacco advertising causes teen smoking, exposure to alcohol ads causes teens to drink
Exposure to alcohol advertising changes teens' attitudes about alcohol and can cause them to start drinking, finds a new analysis led by NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine.
Modern technology reveals old secrets about the great, white Maya road
The first lidar study of the 100-kilometer stone highway that connected the ancient cities of Cobá and Yaxuná on the Yucatan Peninsula 13 centuries ago may shed light on the intentions of Lady K'awiil Ajaw, the warrior queen who University of Miami anthropologist Traci Ardren believes commissioned its construction at the turn of the 7th century.
Glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed new insights into how the microscopic algae that thrives along the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet causes widespread darkening.
The 'purrfect' music for calming cats
Taking a cat to the vets can be a stressful experience, both for cat and owner.
Columbia team discovers new way to control the phase of light using 2D materials
A Columbia University team, led by Michal Lipson, Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering and professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, announced that they have discovered a new way to control the phase of light using 2D materials -- atomically thin materials, ?
Stress may drive people to give as well as receive emotional support
Penn State researchers found that experiencing stress made people both more likely to give and receive emotional support from another person.
Specific gut bacteria may be associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension
Researchers have found a specific bacterial profile in the gut of people with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a chronic and progressive disease that causes constriction of arteries in the lungs.
Predicting persistent cold pool events
In a multi-institutional field campaign with NOAA and other laboratories, researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are working to better identify and forecast the occurrence of cold pool events.
Study: Patients commonly prescribed opioids and antibiotics for dental conditions at EDs
A study in the March issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that antibiotics and opioids are frequently prescribed during emergency department visits for dental conditions, further emphasizing the need for continued efforts to combat both opioid abuse and overuse of antibiotics.
A promising new strategy to help broken bones heal faster
To improve how broken bones heal in people with diabetes, University of Pennsylvania researchers are leading work to develop an affordable oral therapy -- grown in plants.
PA school nurses on the frontlines of the opioid epidemic
As opioid overdoses continue to grab headlines, more states are providing their communities with easier access to naloxone, which can prevent death by reversing opioid overdoses.
Spinal deformities in Sacramento-San Joaquin delta fish linked to toxic mineral selenium
Native fish discovered with spinal deformities in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in 2011 were exposed to high levels of selenium from their parents and food they ate as juveniles in the San Joaquin River, new research has found.
New study shows vision rehab treatment effective for stroke and injury related blindness
Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, co-authored a recently published international study that shows that visual rehabilitation is effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury.
1 billion-year-old green seaweed fossils identified, relative of modern land plants
'This fossil is about twice as old as the oldest tree, or oldest land plants' -- Researcher Shuhai Xiao.
Anonymous no more: combining genetics with genealogy to identify the dead in unmarked graves
A method developed by a team of geneticists, archaeologists and demographers may make it possible to identify thousands of individuals whose remains lie in unmarked graves.
The dangers facing fireflies
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
Looking for local levers
Coral reefs are not doomed. Although human activities threaten the iconic ecosystems in many different ways, scientists maintain that reefs can continue to thrive with the right assistance.
New tool aids patients in selecting a transplant center
A new website developed by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI) and the University of Minnesota (UMN) is making it easier for organ transplant candidates to choose which transplant center is right for them.
Want to catch a photon? Start by silencing the sun
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have created a 3D imaging system that uses light's quantum properties to create images 40,000 times crisper than current technologies, paving the way for never-before seen LIDAR sensing and detection in self-driving cars, satellite mapping systems, deep-space communications and medical imaging of the human retina.
Leukemia drugs hold promise for treatment-resistant lung cancer
New live-cell drug discovery tool developed at the University of Toronto identifies two leukemia drugs and other small molecules as potential treatments for lung tumours that stopped responding to therapy.
New tech takes radiation out of cancer screening
Researchers have developed a new, inexpensive technology that could save lives and money by routinely screening women for breast cancer without exposure to radiation.
The seismicity of Mars
Fifteen months after the successful landing of the NASA InSight mission on Mars, first scientific analyses of ETH Zurich researchers and their partners reveal that the planet is seismically active.
As oceans warm, fish flee
New research shows that nations in the tropics are especially vulnerable to the loss of fish species due to climate change.
Electron microscopy allows scientists to understand the molecular trigger of allergic reactions
For the first time, researchers from the Department of Engineering and the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University have described the structure of an IgE antibody responsible for allergic reactions.
CRISPR gene cuts may offer new way to chart human genome
In search of new ways to sequence human genomes and read critical alterations in DNA, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used the gene cutting tool CRISPR to make cuts in DNA around lengthy tumor genes, which can be used to collect sequence information.
Extra chromosomes in cancers can be good or bad
Extra copies of chromosomes are typical in cancerous tumor cells, but researchers taking a closer look find that some extra copies promote cancer growth while others actually inhibit cancer metastasis.
Childhood physical abuse linked to heavy cigarette use among teens who smoke
A new study in kids at risk for maltreatment shows that physical abuse, especially when they're toddlers or teens, dramatically increases the odds that their adolescent experimentation with cigarettes will lead to a heavy smoking habit.
Too much of a good thing may lead to too much of a liver as well
UC San Diego researchers suggest that prolonged exposure to a pair of antioxidant proteins may contribute to enlargement of the liver and fatty liver diseases.
Weight gain associated with accelerated lung function decline in adulthood
Lung function declines naturally over the course of the human lifespan.
There's a better way to think about being kept waiting at work
Generally, abstract thinking leads to better outcomes, such as more creativity, wider vision and feeling more powerful.
An 'exceptionally stable' single-atom catalyst
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have shown that single platinum atoms trapped in C12A7 crystals act as a stable and effective catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes, an essential process in the production of many kinds of fine chemicals.
Why monkeys choose to drink alone
Why do some people almost always drop $10 in the Salvation Army bucket and others routinely walk by?
Swarming robots avoid collisions, traffic jams
Researchers have developed the first decentralized algorithm with a collision-free, deadlock-free guarantee and validated it on a swarm of 100 autonomous robots in the lab.
New tool for an old disease: Use of PET and CT scans may help develop shorter TB treatment
Experts believe that tuberculosis, or TB, has been a scourge for humans for some 15,000 years, with the first medical documentation of the disease coming out of India around 1000 B.C.E.
Watching magnetic nano 'tornadoes' in 3D
Scientists have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique to observe complex behaviours in magnets, including fast-moving waves and 'tornadoes' thousands of times thinner than a human hair.
Study finds inflammation caused by radiation can drive triple-negative breast cancer
While radiation is successfully used to treat breast cancer by killing cancer cells, inflammation caused as a side-effect of radiation can have a contrary effect by promoting the survival of triple-negative breast cancer cells, according to research published online in the International Journal of Radiation Biology by Jennifer Sims-Mourtada, Ph.D., director of Translational Breast Cancer Research at ChristianaCare's Helen F.
ETRI develops optical communications technology to double data transfer speed
Researchers in South Korea have developed a new optical communications technology that can transfer data in lightning speed.
A simple retrofit transforms electron microscopes into high-speed atom-scale cameras
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have developed a way to retrofit the transmission electron microscope -- a long-standing scientific workhorse for making crisp microscopic images -- so that it can also create high-quality movies of super-fast processes at the atomic and molecular scale.
Validating Toolbox to evaluate cognitive processing in people with intellectual disability
Researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute have updated and validated a series of tests in the NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery.
Forest 'duff' must be considered in controlled burning to avoid damaging trees
Many decades of forest fire prevention and suppression has resulted in a thick buildup of organic matter on the forest floor in many regions of the United States, according to a Penn State researcher, whose new study suggests that the peculiar way that these layers burn should be considered in plans for controlled burns.
Directing nanoparticles straight to tumors
Modern anticancer therapies aim to attack tumor cells while sparing healthy tissue.
Study puts spin into quantum technologies
The ability to manipulate and read out single electron spins in solids has the potential to advance applications in fundamental science, defence and industry--scientists say.
Climate change will cause a loss of olive production in Andalusia
A study led by the University of Cordoba estimates close to a 30% decrease in production in the province of Seville, which will most suffer the effects of climate change
Solar storms may leave gray whales blind and stranded
A new study reported in the journal Current Biology on February 24 offers some of the first evidence that gray whales might depend on a magnetic sense to find their way through the ocean.
Releasing brakes: Potential new methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapies
Testing of small molecules in mouse models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy shows promise for restoration of muscle structure and function.
Why Edgar Allan Poe probably did not kill himself
A computational analysis of language used by the writer Edgar Allan Poe has revealed that his mysterious death was unlikely to have been suicide.
Transport protein efficiently uses three independent lifts to shuttle the goods
The structure of a transport complex used by bacteria to import aspartate has been mapped in unique detail by University of Groningen scientists.
New in the Hastings Center Report: A call to confront mistrust in the US health care system
'For those who have faced exploitation and discrimination at the hands of physicians, the medical profession, and medical institutions, trust is a tall order and, in many cases, would be naïve,' writes Laura Specker Sullivan in 'Trust, Risk, and Race in American Medicine.'
Immunotherapy combo effective for patients with high-grade neuroendocrine cancer
Many patients with rare, fast-growing neuroendocrine tumors respond well to a common immunotherapy drug combination, according to the first peer-reviewed publication out of DART, short for Dual Anti-CTLA-4 and Anti-PD-1 Blockade in Rare Tumors, a unique rare cancer clinical trial.
Boost soybean yields by adapting photosynthesis to fleeting shadows, according to model
Today a team from the University of Illinois reports a new mathematical computer model that is used to understand how much yield is lost as soybean crops grapple with minute-by-minute light fluctuations on cloudy and sunny days.
'Make two out of one' -- division of artificial cells
Max Planck scientists uncover a novel and generic mechanism for the division of artificial cells into two daughter cells.
How cancer cells stiff-arm normal environmental cues to consume energy
Using human lung cancer cells, UT Southwestern researchers have uncovered how cells in general modulate their energy consumption based on their surroundings and, furthermore, how cancer cells override those cues to maximize energy use.
Self-reported student mistreatment in US medical schools
An analysis of annual surveys from graduating students at all U.S.
Let it snow: Researchers put cloud seeding to the test
Cloud seeding has become an increasingly popular practice in the western United States, where states grapple with growing demands for water.
Rice scientists simplify access to drug building block
Rice University chemists further simplify their process to make essential precursor molecules for drug discovery and manufacture.
TMS shows promise in treating stroke, dementia and migraines
TMS shows promise in treating a broad range of neurological disorders, including stroke, dementia and migraines.
Social determinant screening not enough to capture patients at risk of utility shut-off
Researchers at Boston Medical Center have found that only a fraction of patients at risk of having their utilities shut off were identified through social determinants of health (SDOH) screening.
Quadrupling turbines, US can meet 2030 wind-energy goals
The United States could generate 20% of its electricity from wind within 10 years, without requiring any additional land, according to Cornell University research published in Nature Scientific Reports.
Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link farming, herding with emergence of new disease
Using Salmonella enterica genomes recovered from human skeletons as old as 6,500 years, an international team of researchers illustrates the evolution of a human pathogen and provides the first ancient DNA evidence in support of the hypothesis that the cultural transition from foraging to farming facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens that persist until today.
Obesity embargo alert for March 2020
All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed news releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.
Camera trap study captures Sumatran tigers, clouded leopards, other rare beasts
Scientists deployed motion-sensitive camera traps across a 50-square-mile swath of Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in southern Sumatra and, over the course of eight years, recorded the haunts and habits of dozens of species, including the Sumatran tiger and other rare and endangered wildlife.
Research finds support for 'Trump effect'
In the years since the 2016 presidential election, many have speculated Donald Trump's racially inflammatory speech empowered people with latent prejudices to finally act on them -- a phenomenon known as the 'Trump effect.' Now, a new study from a team of political scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found empirical support that suggests Trump's inflammatory remarks on the campaign trail emboldened particular members of the American public to express deeply held prejudices.
McGill researchers end decade-long search for mechanical pain sensor
Researchers at McGill University have discovered that a protein found in the membrane of our sensory neurons are involved in our capacity to feel mechanical pain, laying the foundation for the development of powerful new analgesic drugs.
UW researchers contribute to quantifiable observation of cloud seeding
Scientists found that cloud seeding in the Idaho mountains produced a total of about 235 Olympic-sized swimming pools' worth of water.
USask computer-based simulator tests insects for effects of new pesticide
University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have used a novel combination of techniques to compare the effects of two families of pesticides used in agriculture, and found that at low dosages the newer pesticide is less toxic than a currently used neonicotinoid one.
Cook County's short-lived 'soda' tax worked, says new study
A study of beverage sales in Cook County, Illinois, shows that for four months in 2017 -- when the county implemented a penny-per-ounce tax on both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened drinks -- purchases of the taxed beverages decreased by 21%, even after an adjustment for cross-border shopping.
Marijuana use among older adults in US
Cannabis use apparently continues to increase among older adults in the U.S. based on findings reported in this research letter.
The Lancet Digital Health: Video game-like intervention shows promise in improving attention of children with ADHD
A four-week randomised controlled trial of 348 children aged 8-12 years, published in journal The Lancet Digital Health, suggests that a digital intervention for paediatric attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might help to improve inattention with minimal adverse effects.
New method gives glaucoma researchers control over eye pressure
Neuroscientists have developed a new method that permits continuous regulation of eye pressure without damage, becoming the first to definitively prove pressure in the eye is sufficient to cause and explain glaucoma.
Cardiologists: Big data advances research, but shouldn't do so at the cost of privacy
Your doctor protects your sensitive health data. But in a new publication, experts assert it's important to check if that app you just downloaded will, too.
Clemson researchers ID protein function in parasites that cause sometimes fatal diseases
In the quest to develop more effective treatments for parasitic diseases, scientists look for weaknesses in the organisms' molecular machinery.
Going super small to get super strong metals
Metals get stronger as the size of the grains making up the metal get smaller -- up to a point.
Recent research points the way toward a practical nutraceutical strategy for coping with RNA virus infections including influenza and coronavirus
In a compelling article in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, published by Elsevier, Mark McCarty of the Catalytic Longevity Foundation, San Diego, CA, USA, and James DiNicolantonio, PharmD, a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USA, propose that certain nutraceuticals may help provide relief to people infected with encapsulated RNA viruses such as influenza and coronavirus.
The combination of plant-based particles and water forms an 'eco' super-glue
Plant-based cellulose nanocrystals have remarkable inherent properties, and when combined with water, a powerful adhesive is formed that competes in strength with Superglue, without the need for toxic solvents.
Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.
Study links physical activity to quality of life in African American cancer survivors
New research published in CANCER suggests that regular exercise may improve the well-being of African American cancer survivors, but most survivors do not meet current recommendations for physical activity.
Soft robot fingers gently grasp deep-sea jellyfish
Marine biologists have adopted ''soft robotic linguine fingers'' as tools to conduct their undersea research.
UBC researchers develop strategy to protect wine grapes from smoke-taint
It's a problem plaguing grape-growers worldwide -- in an ever-changing climate, how can they protect their crops from the undesirable effects of wildfire smoke exposure.
Threatened birds and mammals have irreplaceable roles in the natural world
A new study led from the University of Southampton has shown that threatened birds and mammals are often ecologically distinct and irreplaceable in their environment.
USU herpetologist reports surprising evolutionary shift in snakes
A multi-national team of scientists reports a case of a vertebrate predator switching from a vertebrate prey to an invertebrate prey for the selective advantage of obtaining the same chemical class of defensive toxins.
ACR releases reproductive health guideline for patients with rheumatic diseases
Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published the 2020 Guideline for the Management of Reproductive Health in Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Diseases.
New study offers clues to origin of laws
The study found that despite living in separate countries and legal codes separated by thousands of years, people have a universal intuition about whether a punishment fits a crime.
Design of the W7-X fusion device enables it to overcome obstacles
Advanced design of the world's largest and most powerful stellarator demonstrates the ability to moderate heat loss from the plasma that fuels fusion reactions.
Research identifies how new cancer treatments can activate tuberculosis infection
Researchers at the University of Southampton have identified how new checkpoint inhibitor treatments for cancer can activate tuberculosis in some patients.
Engaging with schizophrenia -- experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham.
Scientists develop a composite membrane for long-life zinc-based flow batteries
Researchers led by Profs. LI Xianfeng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a composite membrane for long-life zinc-based flow batteries.
Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity
Researchers have developed novel probes to track cellular events that can lead to obesity.

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