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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 26, 2020


Scientists discover dust from Middle East cools the Red Sea
Researchers at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have discovered dust from the Middle East has a positive cooling effect over the land and the Red Sea.
Nanosize device 'uncloaks' cancer cells in mice and reveals them to the immune system
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have designed and successfully tested an experimental, super small package able to deliver molecular signals that tag implanted human cancer cells in mice and make them visible for destruction by the animals' immune systems.
Antioxidant precursor molecule could improve brain function in patients with MS
The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis.
Cannabis compound acts as an antibiotic 
Public health agencies worldwide have identified antibiotic resistance of disease-causing bacteria as one of humanity's most critical challenges.
How low can you go? Lower than ever before
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made the most sensitive measurements to date of how quickly electric charge moves in silicon, a gauge of its performance as a semiconductor.
Widowhood accelerates cognitive decline among those at risk for Alzheimer's disease
A new study finds that widowhood can have another profound effect: It may accelerate cognitive decline.
Comparing greenhouse gas footprints of online versus traditional shopping
When consumers are trying to decide between traditional and online shopping, many factors come into play, such as price, quality, convenience and timeframe.
Vertical fibers in the suckerfish's suction cup-like fin help it hitchhike
As the hitchhikers of the marine world, the remora fish is well known for getting free rides by gripping onto hosts with its suction disc, a highly modified dorsal fin on its head.
Study finds long-term endurance exercise is associated with enlarged aorta
Study finds high percentage of long term endurance athletes had aortas larger than the upper limit of clinical normality.
Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals
San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute.
HKUST scientists shed light on COVID-19 vaccine development
A team HKUST scientists has recently identified a set of potential vaccine targets for SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, to guide experimental efforts towards vaccine development against novel pneumonia (COVID-19).
ALS mystery illuminated by blue light
The first optogenetic ALS animal model is developed using zebrafish, in which the key symptoms of ALS, including TDP-43 aggregation, are reproducible in the intact neuromuscular system by external light illumination.
Sweat sensor detects stress levels; May find use in space exploration
Caltech researcher has developed a sweat sensor capable of monitoring levels of cortisol in the body.
Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health
A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health.
Small precipitates make big difference in mitigating strength-ductility tradeoff
Researchers from the Institute of Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, teaming up with scientists from Singapore and the US, have found that nanoscale precipitates provide a unique sustainable dislocation source at sufficiently high stress.
Intensive blood pressure control can extend life up to 3 years
Investigators from the Brigham describe how aggressively lowering blood pressure levels can extend a person's life expectancy.
New bile discovery will rewrite textbooks
Forget what you know about bile because that's about to change, thanks to a new discovery made by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Nature.
Billions lost as illicit fisheries trade hurting nations who can afford it least
More than eight million to 14 million tonnes of unreported fish catches are traded illicitly every year, costing the legitimate market between $9 billion and $17 billion in trade each year, according to new UBC research.
Researchers develop gene catalog comprising community of microbes in vaginal microbio
University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) researchers have created the first catalogue of genes that comprise the community of microbes, which inhabit the human vagina.
TRAX air quality study expands
In a new study published in Urban Science, researchers including Daniel Mendoza and Logan Mitchell report the latest from the TRAX Observation Project, including data validation studies that bolster the data's value for other researchers and three case studies from recent events showcasing the abilities of the mobile air quality sensors.
Scientists find link between genes and ability to exercise
A team of researchers have discovered a genetic mutation that reduces a patient's ability to exercise efficiently.
Mount Sinai physicians first in US analyzing lung disease in coronavirus patients
Findings from CT scans of COVID-19 cases from China provide new insight that could lead to quicker diagnosis.
Bifunctional nanobodies protect against botulinum neurotoxins including Botox
New study reveals potential for developing novel antibody-based antitoxins against botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), including the most commonly used, yet most toxic one, Botox.
Sugary drinks a sour choice for adults trying to maintain normal cholesterol levels
Adults who drank sugary beverages daily had an increased risk of developing abnormal blood cholesterol and triglycerides compared to those who did not, according to new findings from a prospective study by researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.
New compounds thwart multiple viruses, including coronavirus
According to a Feb. 13 report from the World Health Organization, the Wuhan coronavirus has stricken more than 46,000 people and has caused over 1,300 deaths since the first cases in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.
Breaking down stubborn molecules
Seawater is more than just saltwater. The ocean is a veritable soup of chemicals.
Scientists discover new clue behind age-related diseases and food spoilage
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a surprising discovery that could help explain our risk for developing chronic diseases or cancers as we get older, and how our food decomposes over time.
Are cats the 'canary in the coal mine' for wildfire effects on human health?
Cats who suffered burns and smoke inhalation in recent California wildfires also had a high incidence of heart problems, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.
Researchers make asthma breakthrough
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough that may eventually lead to improved therapeutic options for people living with asthma.
Comparing PFAS exposures in female firefighters and office workers
Firefighters have higher rates of some cancers than the general population, which might not be surprising given the many potential carcinogens they encounter while battling blazes.
UCLA engineers develop miniaturized 'warehouse robots' for biotechnology applications
UCLA engineers have developed minuscule warehouse logistics robots that could help expedite and automate medical diagnostic technologies and other applications that move and manipulate tiny drops of fluid.
Cognitive impairment after intensive care linked to long-lasting inflammation
People who have been treated in intensive care commonly suffer from residual cognitive impairment, but the reason for this is unknown.
'Mars quakes': First seismological data help understand the Red Planet's composition
Almost 14 months after the landing of NASA's InSight Mission on Mars, researchers present the first data ever gathered on the Red Planet's seismic activity.
Quitting smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy still puts the baby at risk
Although quitting smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy reduces the risk of low birth weight, it isn't enough to protect the unborn child from being born shorter and with smaller brain size, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
Tax rule for industry rewards carbon capture
When it comes to encouraging manufacturers to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a carrot might be more effective than a stick.
Possible new treatment strategy for fatty liver disease
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular pathway that when silenced could restore the normal function of immune cells in people with fatty liver disease.
Stretchable, wearable coils may make MRI, other medical tests easier on patients
The Purdue team created an adaptable, wearable and stretchable fabric embroidered with conductive threads that provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio for enhanced MRI scanning.
These feet were made for walking
Many of us take our feet for granted, but they have a challenging job in the biomechanics department.
Metal-organic frameworks can separate gases despite the presence of water
Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for inexpensive and less energy-intensive gas separation even in the presence of impurities such as water.
Abandoned cropland helps make Europe cooler
As nations prepare to mitigate climate change, decision makers need to understand how land use fits into the climate equation.
KIER developed separator that reduced gas crossover for water electrolyzer
Dr. Won-chul Cho of Hydrogen Research Department of the Korea Institute of Energy Research has developed a separator membrane that significantly reduces gas crossover while exhibiting high performance comparable to the commercial separator for alkaline water electrolyzer.
Crowdfunding -- entrepreneurs should resist the urge to promise to save the Earth
Entrepreneurs seeking funds on business-oriented crowdfunding platforms should avoid over-emphasizing the social or environmental benefits of their start-ups or products if they are to maximize potential investment.
Researchers identify novel anti-aging targets
A recent study published in Nature has reported two conserved epigenetic regulators as novel anti-aging targets.
Perovskite solar cells made of peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives, preventing lead leakage
Professor Taiho Park and his research team from POSTECH developed eco-friendly-solvent processable hole transport polymers by using peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives and the polymer can prevent lead leakage.
The best preoperative definition of cancer-related malnutrition depends on cancer type
The best approach for surgeons to identify malnourished cancer patients before they have a cancer operation may be specifically related to the type of cancer.
Examining enlargement of the aorta among older endurance athletes
Researchers in this observational study evaluated dimensions of the aorta in 442 older competitive runners and rowers (ages 50 to 75) to examine the association between long-term endurance exercise and enlargement of the artery.
Overlooked arch in the foot is key to its evolution and function
A long-overlooked part of the human foot is key to how the foot works, how it evolved, and how we walk and run, a Yale-led team of researchers said.
Targeting stromal cells may help overcome treatment resistance in glioblastoma
The deadly brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) is often resistant to chemotherapy and radiation, but new research shows targeting stromal cells -- the cells that serve as the connective tissue of the organs -- may be an effective way of overcoming that resistance.
What we learned after 5,000 non-surgical rhinoplasties
As patients continue to seek non-invasive treatments across the cosmetic spectrum, 'liquid rhinoplasty' is emerging as the non-surgical alternative to the traditional nose job.
A tadpole with a twist: Left-right asymmetric development of Oikopleura dioica
Oikopleura dioica, a tadpole-like tunicate, shows a left-right patterning strategy that is distinct from other chordates, with left-right asymmetry emerging in the four-cell embryo.
Motley crew: Rust and light a possible answer to the conundrum of hydrogen fuel production
Production of hydrogen fuel is a key goal towards the development of sustainable energy practices, but this process does not have feasible techniques yet.
New patented invention stabilizes, rotates satellites
Many satellites are in space to take photos. But a vibrating satellite, like a camera in shaky hands, can't get a sharp image.
Chemists learn how to detect phenols in smoked food samples using vitamin B4
They propose to extract these phenols by use of choline chloride, otherwise known as vitamin B4.
Omega-3 fatty acids may prevent breast implant complications, like capsular contracture
For women receiving breast implants during reconstructive or cosmetic breast surgery, scarring around the implant - called capsular contracture - is a common, costly, and painful complication.
Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics
A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency.
STATICA: A novel processor that solves a notoriously complex mathematical problem
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed a novel processor architecture that can solve combinatorial optimization problems much faster than existing ones.
Scientists discover new compound which could improve photodynamic therapy for cancer
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have synthesized a new compound which could improve the success rate of photodynamic therapy when treating cancer.
KAT6A syndrome: Advances on the genetic bases and clinical picture of a rare disease
A research team has described five new cases of a rare disease -- known as KAT6A syndrome -- of which there are only eighty dominant cases worldwide.
Explained: Why water droplets 'bounce off the walls'
University of Warwick researchers can now explain why some water droplets bounce like a beach ball off surfaces, without ever actually touching them.
Understanding the link between nicotine use and misuse of 'benzos'
Lately, misuse of prescription benzodiazepines (such as alprazolam or Xanax, and diazepam or Valium) has been linked to nicotine use.
Freshwater flowing into the North Pacific plays key role in North America's climate
Massive freshwater river flows stemming from glacier-fed flooding at the end of the last ice age surged across eastern Washington to the Columbia River and out to the North Pacific Ocean, where they triggered climate changes throughout the northern hemisphere.
Surveillance after surgery does not improve outcomes for patients with glioblastoma
A retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care showed patients who underwent surveillance imaging after surgery for brain tumor resection did not have better outcomes than patients who did not have imaging and returned when they felt symptoms of recurrence.
Job insecurity negatively affects your personality: Study
Drawing on Cybernetic Big Five Theory, this study proposes that chronic job insecurity is associated with an increase in neuroticism and decreases in agreeableness and conscientiousness.
Fur-friendly 'wearable for pets' developed at Imperial
Imperial College London researchers have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing.
Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research.
Potential new heartburn drug studied at VUMC
An investigational drug that binds bile acids in the stomach can reduce the severity of heartburn symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when combined with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), a new study suggests.
Mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland solved
The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century.
Cold sintering produces capacitor material at record low temperatures
Barium titanate is an important electroceramic material used in trillions of capacitors each year and found in most electronics.
Structural framework for tumors also provides immune protection
Aggressive colorectal cancers set up an interactive network of checkpoints to keep the immune system at bay, scientists report.
Turbulent times revealed on Asteroid 4 Vesta
Planetary scientists at Curtin University have shed some light on the tumultuous early days of the largely preserved protoplanet Asteroid 4 Vesta, the second largest asteroid in our solar system.
Poor cleaning can jeopardize sterilization of medical tools
Vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) failed to completely sterilize surgical tools 76% of the time when the tools were soiled with salts or blood and not cleaned prior to sterilization, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Anti-psychotic medication linked to adverse change in brain structure
In a first-of-its-kind study using advanced brain imaging techniques, a commonly used anti-psychotic medication was associated with potentially adverse changes in brain structure.
New CRISPR base-editing technology slows ALS progression in mice
With a new CRISPR gene-editing methodology, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign inactivated one of the genes responsible for an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- a debilitating and fatal neurological disease for which there is no cure.
No benefit found in using broad-spectrum antibiotics as initial pneumonia treatment
Doctors who use drugs that target antibiotic-resistant bacteria as a first-line defense against pneumonia should probably reconsider this approach, according to a new study of more than 88,000 veterans hospitalized with the disease.
Intervention to help GPs identify and treat patients with hepatitis C found to be effective
The first UK clinical trial to increase the identification and treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) patients in primary care has been found to be effective, acceptable to staff and highly cost-effective for the NHS.
Roberts Individualized Medical Genetics Center outlines centralized genetic testing model
In a special report published today in the journal Pediatrics, Roberts Individualized Medical Genetics Center researchers, physicians, and genetic and financial counselors describe the success of the model, their plans to build on that success for the future, and the important lessons learned from their first four years in operation.
Each Mediterranean island has its own genetic pattern
A Team around Anthropologist Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna -- together with researchers from the University of Florence and Harvard University -- found out that prehistoric migration from Africa, Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean islands took place long before the era of the Mediterranean seafaring civilizations.
Vaping changes oral microbiome, increasing risk for infection
Using e-cigarettes alters the mouth's microbiome -- the community of bacteria and other microorganisms -- and makes users more prone to inflammation and infection, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.
New study allows brain and artificial neurons to link up over the web
Research on novel nanoelectronics devices led by the University of Southampton enabled brain neurons and artificial neurons to communicate with each other over the Internet.
'Low' socioeconomic status is the biggest barrier to STEM participation
A new study has found that socioeconomic status (SES) has the strongest impact on whether secondary school students study the STEM sciences.
Eat or be eaten
Plants obtain their energy from the sun. Other beings rely on eating to survive.
Helpful interactions can keep societies stable
University of Pennsylvania biologists have challenged old notions that communities with mutualistic interactions--where the presence of one species benefits another--are unstable.
Bone or cartilage? Presence of fatty acids determines skeletal stem cell development
In the event of a bone fracture, fatty acids in our blood signal to stem cells that they have to develop into bone-forming cells.
Study reveals potential new treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have uncovered a potentially more beneficial treatment regimen for patients with metastatic melanoma.
How resident microbes restructure body chemistry
A comparison of normal and germ-free mice revealed that as much as 70% of a mouse's gut chemistry is determined by its gut microbiome.
Melting properties determine biological functions of cuticular hydrocarbon layer of ants
The bodies of ants are covered with wax-like substances known as cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) that serve communication as well as protection against desiccation.
McMaster researchers uncover hidden antibiotic potential of cannabis
The research team found that CBG had antibacterial activity against drug-resistant MRSA.
Wildness in urban parks important for human well-being
A new study led by the University of Washington has found that not all forms of nature are created equal when considering benefits to people's well-being.
Slow, steady increase in exercise intensity is best for heart health
For the vast majority of people, the benefits of physical exercise outweigh the risks.
Isotope movement holds key to the power of fusion reactions
Controlling the uniformity of hydrogen isotope density ratio in fusion plasma is a problem for realizing fusion energy.
International group of scientists found new regulators of blood supply to the brain
There are approximately as many neuroglia class cells known as astrocytes in the brain as there are neurons, but the function of these cells has long remained a mystery to scientists.
Complex local conditions keep fields of dunes from going active all at once
New research on sand dunes in China describes how even neighboring dunes can long remain in different and seemingly conflicting states -- confounding the assessment of stabilization efforts and masking the effects of climate change.
Scientists 'film' a quantum measurement
Measuring a quantum system causes it to change -- one of the strange but fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics.
A tactile robot finger with no blind spots
Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today that they have introduced a new type of robotic finger with a sense of touch.
CT provides best diagnosis for COVID-19
In a study of more than 1,000 patients published in the journal Radiology, chest CT outperformed lab testing in the diagnosis of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
Oncotarget: Both BRCA1-wild type and -mutant triple-negative breast cancers show
Oncotarget Volume 11 Issue 8 features Figure 8, 'MLN4924 treatment induces DNA damage by stabilizing CDT1 and accumulates the cells in S phase which are enhanced by MLN4924/cisplatin co-treatment,' by Misra, et al.
Discovery of entirely new class of RNA caps in bacteria
The group of Dr. Hana Cahová of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, has discovered an entirely new class of dinucleoside polyphosphate 5'RNA caps in bacteria and described the function of alarmones and their mechanism of function.
The force is strong in neutron stars
Physicists at MIT and elsewhere have for the first time characterized the strong nuclear force, and the interactions between protons and neutrons, at extremely short distances.
Elderly patients also benefit from kidney transplantation
So far, kidney transplantation has generally not been offered to elderly patients (>75 years) because of the perioperative risks.
SWOG study shows genetic effects of pre-surgical chemo in breast cancer
Results from one of the first studies to determine the effects of pre-surgical, or neoadjuvant, chemotherapy on the breast cancer genome offer up two key insights.
Connectedness to nature makes children happier
A new study has shown that connectedness to nature makes children more likely to perform sustainable behaviors, which in turn gives them greater levels of happiness.
Do girls read better than boys? If so, gender stereotypes may be to blame
A new longitudinal study of fifth and sixth graders in Germany examined the relation between classmates' gender stereotypes and individual students' reading outcomes to shed light on how these stereotypes contribute to the gender gap in reading.
Mathematician identifies new tricks for the old arch in our foot
Walking and running subjects our feet to forces in excess of body weight.
Drivers of expensive cars less likely to yield for pedestrians: UNLV study
What does the car you drive say about your manners?
Ancient meteorite site on Earth could reveal new clues about Mars' past
Scientists have devised new analytical tools to break down the enigmatic history of Mars' atmosphere -- and whether life was once possible there.
Stem cell transplants in utero offers TX for metabolic disorders that often end pregnancy
Administering stem cell or enzyme therapy in utero may be a path to alleviating some congenital diseases that often result in losing a pregnancy, according to a new study in mice by UC San Francisco researchers, who showed that stem cells can enter the fetal brain during prenatal development and make up for cells that fail to make an essential protein.
Gold nanoparticles detect signals from cancer cells
A novel blood test that uses gold nanoparticles to detect cancer has also been shown to identify signals released by cancer cells.
Researchers develop technique to create nanomaterials which may help detect cancer earlier
For the first time, a team of scientists at the University of Central Florida has created functional nanomaterials with hollow interiors that can be used to create highly sensitive biosensors for early cancer detection.
Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in RA patients
Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
Celestial hourglass
The latest image from the international Gemini Observatory showcases the striking planetary nebula CVMP 1.
Blood test can predict clinical response to immunotherapy in metastatic NSCLC
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with higher measures of tumor mutations that show up in a blood test generally have a better clinical response to PD-1-based immunotherapy treatments than patients with a lower measure of mutations.
Revving up immune system may help treat eczema
Studying eczema, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
New functional indicators to detect human activity impacts in temporary rivers
Functional metrics in ecology -- indicators based on the biological features of the organisms, in this case, water invertebrates -- could help researchers to detect the impacts of human origins in temporary rivers.
Digging into the far side of the moon: Chang'E-4 probes 40 meters into lunar surface
A little over a year after landing, China's spacecraft Chang'E-4 is continuing to unveil secrets from the far side of the Moon.
MOF co-catalyst allows selectivity of branched aldehydes of up to 90%
Heterogeneous catalysts are often preferred because of their robustness and lower operating costs, but homogenous catalysts still dominate when high selectivity is needed -- finding superior heterogeneous catalysts has been a challenge.
Journal maps intersection of immigration and aging
A new special issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America explores how contemporary trends in immigration, migration, and refugee movement affect how people age and how societies care for aging people.
Tadpoles break the tension with bubble-sucking
When it comes to the smallest of creatures, the hydrogen bonds that hold water molecules together to form 'surface tension' lend enough strength to support their mass: think of insects that skip across the surface of water.
Researchers overcome the space between protons and neutrons to study heart of matter
Nuclear physicists have entered a new era for probing the strongest force in the universe at its very heart with a novel method of accessing the space between protons and neutrons in dense environments.
Mosaic evolution painted lorikeets a rainbow of color
A new study examines how color evolved in one of the flashiest groups of parrots -- Australasian lorikeets -- finding that different plumage patches on the birds evolved independently.
Rates of ADHD diagnosis in veterans are rising, reports VA study in Medical Care
Rates of diagnosed attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in veterans receiving care in the VA health system more than doubled during the past decade, reports a study in the March issue of Medical Care.
Drinks with added sugars linked to lipid imbalance, which increases CVD risk
Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages daily was linked to lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), ('good' cholesterol), and higher triglyceride levels, both of which can increase cardiovascular disease risk.
How big is the neutron?
The size of neutrons cannot be measured directly: it can only be determined from experiments involving other particles.
Sex-specific traits of the immune system explain men's susceptibility to obesity
Melbourne researchers have uncovered important differences between the male and female immune system which may explain why men are more susceptible to obesity and metabolism-related associated diseases, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
Multi-sensor band quickly and simply records subtle changes in patients with MS
An international team of scientists, led by UC San Diego researchers, has developed a new, multi-sensor tool that measures subtle changes in multiple sclerosis patients, allowing physicians to more frequently and more quickly respond to changes in symptoms or patient condition.
Researchers discover second type of schizophrenia
In a study of more than 300 patients from three continents, over one third had brains that looked similar to healthy people.
Metals could be the link to new antibiotics
Compounds containing metals could hold the key to the next generation of antibiotics to combat the growing threat of global antibiotic resistance.
Research suggests adults - not just teens - like electronic cigarette flavors
On February 6, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began to enforce a previously-issued policy on unauthorized flavored cartridge-based e-cigarette products with the goal of addressing the current epidemic of youth use of e-cigarettes.
Study analyzes impact of switch from nuclear power to coal, suggests directions for policy
A new study used data from the United States to analyze the costs and benefits of electricity production from coal-fired versus nuclear sources.
Cases of poisoning: Liquids containing cannabidiols for e-cigarettes can be manipulated
The health risks of e-cigarettes have come into focus after the deaths of several 'vapers' due to lung injury in the USA recently.
New research sheds light on the unique 'call' of Ross Sea killer whales
New Curtin University-led research has found that the smallest type of killer whale has 28 different complex calls, comprising a combination of burst-pulse sounds and whistles, which they use to communicate with family members about the changing landscape and habitat.
One year into 'soda tax,' researchers find law did not affect sugary-beverage consumption
One year into Philadelphia's 1.5-cents-per-ounce 'soda tax,' new findings show that the law had minimal to no influence on what Philadelphians are drinking.
Metabolic health and weight management key to minimizing diabetes risk
Increased fat distribution during menopause has long been shown to increase insulin resistance and the risk of diabetes.
ADDF statement on the USPSTF Evidence Report on screening for cognitive impairment
The latest US Preventive Services Task Force evidence report on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults raises many questions, but provides few answers for healthcare providers, patients, and families.
Using light to put a twist on electrons
Method with polarized light can create and measure nonsymmetrical states in a layered material.

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