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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 27, 2020


Antarctic ice walls protect the climate
Inland Antarctic ice contains volumes of water that can raise global sea levels by several metres.
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies.
New immunotherapeutic strategy shows promise in eradicating infectious biofilms
The same way baking soda breaks down grease and grime, making surfaces easier to clean, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University now show that a new therapeutic molecule can break apart communities of harmful bacteria, opening the way for bacteria-killing antibiotics to more effectively clear out infections.
How door-to-door canvassing slowed an epidemic
Liberia was the epicenter of a high-profile Ebola outbreak in 2014-15, which led to more than 10,000 deaths in West Africa.
Pre-operative immunotherapy triggers encouraging response in oral cancers
A new clinical trial suggests that immunotherapy given before other treatments for oral cavity cancers can elicit an immune response that shrinks tumors, which could provide long-term benefit for patients.
Children who read books daily score higher in school tests, vast new study states
What children choose to read outside school directly influences their academic performance, according to a major new study led by the University of Malaga and UCL, and published in the peer-reviewed journal Oxford Review of Education.
Researchers solve old biodiversity mystery
The underlying cause for why some regions are home to an extremely large number of animal species may be found in the evolutionary adaptations of species, and how they limit their dispersion to specific natural habitats.
Extra olive virgin oil keeps healthy properties when used for cooking
Consuming extra virgin olive oil has proved to have protecting effects for the health, especially due to its antioxidant content.
Naked mole rats migrate above ground with no help from the moon
A new study published in the African Journal of Ecology considers the role of the moon in driving a particularly rare occurrence: the solo journey of a naked mole rat from one underground colony to start a new one.
Extinction resistance, not speciation, shaped ecologically diverse modern marine fauna
Ecologically diverse clades came to dominate the modern oceans because they were better buffered against the successive mass extinctions events which reshaped marine animals over evolutionary time -- not because of their higher rates of speciation, according to a new study.
Early worm lost lower limbs for tube-dwelling lifestyle
Scientists have discovered the earliest known example of an animal evolving to lose body parts it no longer needed.
Newly discovered driver of plant cell growth contradicts current theories
The shape and growth of plant cells may not rely on increased fluidic pressure, or turgor, inside the cell as previously believed.
KIER raised possibilities for urban use of ultralight flexible CIGS thin film solar cell
Korea Institute of Energy Research found an efficiency improvement mechanism of polymer-substrate flexible CIGS thin-film solar cells and published the results in 'Nano Energy' (IF: 15.548).
Revving habits up and down, new insight into how the brain forms habits
Each day, humans and animals rely on habits to complete routine tasks such as eating.
How enzymes build sugar trees
Researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate for the first time the structure and function of a very small enzyme embedded in cell membranes.
Getting off of the blood sugar roller coaster
For the 250,000 Canadians living with type 1 diabetes, the days of desperately trying to keep their blood sugar stable are coming to an end.
Say goodbye to power outages, says UBC Okanagan engineer
With the goal of eliminating brownouts and blackouts, new research from UBC's Okanagan School of Engineering is redesigning how electricity is distributed within power grids.
Unlocking animal behavior through motion
Using physics to study different types of animal motion, such as burrowing worms or flying flocks, can reveal how animals behave in different settings.
Drug used for breast, kidney cancers may also extend survival for head and neck cancers
A targeted therapy drug used for breast and kidney cancers may also extend progression-free survival for patients with advanced head and neck cancer who are at high risk for recurrence after standard treatment.
New systemic approach needed to tackle global challenges
The impacts of the corona virus on people's health and daily life, stock markets, and businesses illustrate the increasingly interconnected nature of the challenges facing governments around the world.
Study reveals how green space can reduce violent crime
Researchers identified patterns that can inform public policy, guide urban design and promote neighborhoods that are safe and low in crime.
Abnormal growth of bacterial cells could be linked to anti-microbial resistance
Scientists from the University of Surrey have identified mutations in a gene in an Escherichia coli (E.coli) model that could help explain a form of anti-microbial resistance (AMR) known as 'persistence'.
Distrust of past experience may underlie obsessive-compulsive symptoms
People with higher obsessive-compulsive symptoms may place less trust in their past experience, leading to increased uncertainty, indecisiveness, and exploratory behaviors, according to new research presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Isaac Fradkin of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and colleagues.
Two NE tree species can be used in new sustainable building material
Two tree species native to the Northeast have been found to be structurally sound for use in cross-laminated timber (CLT) - a revolutionary new type of building material with sought-after sustainability characteristics, according to research by a University of Massachusetts Amherst timber engineer.
Handheld 3D printers developed to treat musculoskeletal injuries
Biomedical engineers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine recently developed a handheld 3D bioprinter that could revolutionize the way musculoskeletal surgical procedures are performed.
'Surfing attack' hacks Siri, Google with ultrasonic waves
Using ultrasound waves propagating through a solid surface, researchers at Washington University in St.
Eco-friendly biodiesel from palm oil?
Vegetable oil biofuels are increasingly used as an alternative to fossil fuels despite the growing controversy regarding their sustainability.
Researchers combine advanced spectroscopy technique with video-rate imaging
For the first time, researchers have used an advanced analytical technique known as dual-comb spectroscopy to rapidly acquire extremely detailed hyperspectral images.
Outsmarting pathogens
A new influenza strain appears each flu season, rendering past vaccines ineffective.
MRI shows blood flow differs in men and women
Healthy men and women have different blood flow characteristics in their hearts, according to a new study.
Learning difficulties due to poor connectivity, not specific brain regions
Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge.
Roadmap to a win-win against invasive weeds
Researchers at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, have created the world's first framework, to better guide the management of terrestrial invasive species.
Early intervention following traumatic brain injury reduces epilepsy risk
A research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has found that brains treated with certain drugs within a few days of an injury have a dramatically reduced risk of developing epilepsy later in life.
New research uncovers potential pathway to slowing Alzheimer's
Overcoming the loss of a process in the brain called ''RNA editing'' may slow the progress of Alzheimer's disease and other synaptic disorders, a study shows.
Scientists discover new 'Jekyll and Hyde' immune cell
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have identified a rare, new cell in the immune system with 'Jekyll and Hyde properties.' These cells play a key protective role in immunity to infection but -- if unregulated -- also mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disorders.
New technique could streamline drug design
Technique uses 3D structural models to predict how combinations of molecular blocks might work together.
Astronomy student discovers 17 new planets, including Earth-sized world
University of British Columbia astronomy student Michelle Kunimoto has discovered 17 new planets, including a potentially habitable, Earth-sized world, by combing through data gathered by NASA's Kepler mission.
Risk of recurrent fractures lowered by new care routines
Older people's risk of recurrent fractures decreases by 18 percent if the care they receive is more structured and preventive, through fracture liaison services.
Study reveals how drug meant for Ebola may also work against coronaviruses
A group of University of Alberta researchers who have discovered why the drug remdesivir is effective in treating the coronaviruses that cause Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) expect it might also be effective for treating patients infected with the new COVID-19 strain.
Consumers value products more on sunny and snowy days but not when it rains
Weather is an ever-present force in consumers' daily lives, yet there is little marketing research on how it affects consumers and businesses.
Big data helps farmers adapt to climate variability
A new MSU study is the first to precisely quantify soil and landscape features and spatial and temporal yield variations in response to climate variability.
The Lancet Public Health: Study estimates mental health impact of welfare reform, Universal Credit, in Great Britain
The 2013 Universal Credit welfare reform appears to have led to an increase in the prevalence of psychological distress among unemployed recipients, according to a nationally representative study following more than 52,000 working-age individuals from England, Wales, and Scotland over nine years between 2009-2018, published as part of an issue of The Lancet Public Health journal on income and health.
A common gut microbe secretes a carcinogen
Cancer mutations can be caused by common gut bacteria. By exposing human mini-guts to a particular strain of Escherichia coli, scientist uncovered that these bacteria induce a unique mutational pattern in human DNA.
How does the brain put decisions in context? Study finds unexpected brain region at work
When crossing the street, which way do you first turn your head to check for oncoming traffic?
Challenges and opportunities for women in physics
Women in the United States hold fewer than 25% of bachelor's degrees, 20% of doctoral degrees and 19% of faculty positions in physics.
New radiopharmaceutical shows promise for improved detection of neuroendocrine tumors
A newly developed imaging agent has emerged as a promising aid for diagnosis of neuroendocrine cancer, according to research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
Gene loss more important in animal kingdom evolution than previously thought
Scientists have shown that some key points of animal evolution -- like the ones leading to humans or insects -- were associated with a large loss of genes in the genome.
Rare lizard fossil preserved in amber
The tiny forefoot of a lizard of the genus Anolis was trapped in amber about 15 to 20 million years ago.
Newly identified cellular trash removal program helps create new neurons
New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists reveals how a cellular filament helps neural stem cells clear damaged and clumped proteins, an important step in eventually producing new neurons.
Data centers use less energy than you think
Using the most detailed model to date of global data center energy use, researchers found that massive efficiency gains by data centers have kept energy use roughly flat over the past decade.
How cardiorespiratory function is related to genetics
How cardiorespiratory function is related to genetics How high altitudes affect people's breathing and its coordination with the heart beat is due to genetic differences say researchers.
A better way to detect underground water leaks
Stanford researchers propose a new way to locate water leaks within the tangle of aging pipes found beneath many cities.
Physics meets brain science in Denver
Understanding the brain has been one of science's greatest challenges.
Sensor cube helps keep fish farming afloat
A self-powered water quality sensor could help fish farmers to monitor pollution in their ponds remotely.
A molecular atlas of skin cells
Our skin protects us from physical injury, radiation and microbes, and at the same time produces hair and facilitates perspiration.
Computer scientists' new tool fools hackers into sharing keys for better cybersecurity
Instead of blocking hackers, a new cybersecurity defense approach developed by University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists actually welcomes them.
New method converts carbon dioxide to methane at low temperatures
Waseda University scientists developed a new method to convert carbon dioxide to methane with an electric field at low temperatures.
Opioid use disorder medications improve health outcomes after endocarditis hospitalization
Starting medication to treat opioid use disorder within 30 days of being discharged from the hospital due to injection drug use-related endocarditis -- a type of serious heart infection -- improves health outcomes, a new study shows.
Low fruit and vegetable intakes and higher body fat linked to anxiety disorders
New research from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging shows that adults who have low fruit and vegetable intakes have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.
Monogamous female sea turtles? Yes, thanks to sperm storage
Female sea turtles mate multiply to ensure fertilization. A study of nesting loggerhead female sea turtles in southwest Florida used genotyping to uncover how many fathers were represented in their nests.
Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides.
How do zebrafish get their stripes? New data analysis tool could provide an answer
A new mathematical tool developed at Brown could help scientists better understand how zebrafish get their stripes as well as other self-assembled patterns in nature.
The tentacle 'bot
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Beihang University have developed an octopus-inspired soft robotic arm that can grip, move, and manipulate a wide range of objects.
Shaping the future of machine learning for active matter
Now researchers are presenting guidelines for how active matter, such as cells and microorganisms, can best be studied using machine learning techniques.
ASA survey shows health insurers abruptly terminating physician contracts
A new national survey from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) finds physician anesthesiologists are being forced out of network as insurance companies terminate their contracts, often with little or no notice.
Excellent long-term stability of treatment gains of stepwise treatment for pediatric OCD
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that the long-term stability of treatment gains for children and adolescents diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), participating in a stepwise manualized treatment, is excellent.
New algorithm tracks pediatric sepsis epidemiology using clinical data
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel computational algorithm to track the epidemiology of pediatric sepsis, allowing for the collection of more accurate data about outcomes and incidence of the condition over time, which is essential to the improvement of care.
Tying up molecules as easily as you tie up your laces
Since the 1970s, scientists have been trying to knot molecules together to create new, custom-made mechanical properties, which will give rise to new materials.
Printer toner linked to genetic changes, health risks in new study
According a new study by West Virginia University researcher Nancy Lan Guo, the microscopic toner nanoparticles that waft from laser printers may change our genetic and metabolic profiles in ways that make disease more likely.
Study: Corporate tax incentives do more harm than good to states
A study of tax incentives aimed at attracting and retaining businesses finds that the vast majority of these incentives ultimately leave states worse off than if they had done nothing.
Huntington's disease-causing DNA repeat mutations reversed in the lab
An international team of researchers identifies a compound that corrects genetic abnormalities involved in the onset and progression of Huntington's disease for which there is no definitive treatment.
Bacteria loop-the-loop
The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus swims with the help of two bundles of flagella, which are thread-like structures.
The era of quantum supremacy is here
Google made headlines in late 2019 with an experiment that demonstrated quantum supremacy for the first time.
Anthropogenic seed dispersal: rethinking the origins of plant domestication
Over the past three millennia, selective breeding has dramatically widened the array of plant domestication traits.
Combined therapy may improve clinical responses for endometrial, colorectal and gastric tumors
Combined therapy may improve clinical responses for endometrial, colorectal and gastric tumors.
Artificial intelligence can scan doctors' notes to distinguish between types of back pain
Mount Sinai researchers have designed an artificial intelligence model that can determine whether lower back pain is acute or chronic by scouring doctors' notes within electronic medical records, an approach that can help to treat patients more accurately, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research in February.
Socially assistive robot helps children with autism learn
Researchers at USC's Department of Computer Science have developed personalized learning robots for children with autism.
Study sheds light on how a drug being tested in COVID-19 patients works
As hospitalized COVID-19 patients undergo experimental therapy, research published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry explains how the drug, remdesivir, stops replication in coronaviruses.
A new strategy to prevent the most aggressive tumors from generating resistance to chemotherapy
One of the most frequent problems when treating cancer is that the tumors develop resistance to therapies.
Eating a vegetarian diet rich in nuts, vegetables, soy linked to lower stroke risk
People who eat a vegetarian diet rich in nuts, vegetables and soy may have a lower risk of stroke than people who eat a diet that includes meat and fish, according to a study published in the February 26, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Team deciphers how myotonic dystrophy generates lethal heart dysfunctions
Roughly 80% of people with myotonic dystrophy -- a common form of muscular dystrophy -- experience dangerous heart ailments, and heart rhythm defects are the second-leading cause of death in those with the condition.
Not falling far from tree: Ecologists study seed-to-seedling transitions
Ecologists studying spatial patterns of seeds and surviving seedlings among trees on Panama's Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Forest Dynamics Plot on Barro Colorado Island observed the Hubbell pattern: A large number of seedlings survived under parent trees compared to far away.
Radiation/immunotherapy combo shows promise for recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancers
A new phase II trial finds that a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy led to encouraging survival outcomes and acceptable toxicity for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
Mount Sinai researchers discover new approach for use of stem cells to improve bone marrow transplantation
Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a way to enhance the potency of blood-forming stem cells, potentially opening the door to a new approach for bone marrow transplantation, according to a study published on Feb.
Eat less, live longer
If you want to reduce levels of inflammation throughout your body, delay the onset of age-related diseases, and live longer -- eat less food.
Novel photocatalytic method converts biopolyols and sugars into methanol and syngas
A research group led by Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a photocatalytic method for the conversion of biopolyols and sugars to methanol and syngas.
What are savings of eliminating running water for hand scrubbing before surgery?
Researchers in this study estimated the potential water conservation and financial savings generated by eliminating running water for hand scrubbing before surgery in favor of exclusive use of an alcohol-based scrub at a large ophthalmic surgical hospital.
Existing drugs may offer a first-line treatment for coronavirus outbreak
Developing new drugs and vaccines for diseases like the COVID-19 coronavirus can take years.
How the brain separates words from song
The perception of speech and music -- two of the most uniquely human uses of sound -- is enabled by specialized neural systems in different brain hemispheres adapted to respond differently to specific features in the acoustic structure of the song, a new study reports.
University Hospitals part of study showing 'Fast Breast MRIs' outperform 3-D mammograms
University Hospitals in Cleveland was one of the sites for a national study published Feb.
New JACEP Open analyses explore coronavirus risk factors and public health concerns
JACEP Open, a new official open access journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), explores coronavirus (COVID-19) concerns in two new analyses.
Celiac disease might be cured by restoring immune tolerance to gliadin
Celiac disease affects 0.3-2.4% of people in most countries world-wide, and approx.
Witnessing the birth of baby universes 46 times: The link between gravity and soliton
Scientists have been attempting to come up with an equation to unify the micro and the macro laws of the universe; quantum mechanics and gravity.
Rare diseases - Key insights from small samples
The study of a rare genetic disease has enabled a team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich´s Christoph Klein to uncover the role of a membrane-associated protein in the development and function of human T cells.
Lessons learned from addressing myths about Zika and yellow fever outbreaks in Brazil
When disease epidemics and outbreaks occur, conspiracy theories often emerge that compete with the information provided by public health officials.
Under reporting of data on the outcomes among older adults in cancer clinical trials
While older adults, defined as those 65 and older, make up the largest percentage of cancer patients and survivors, this group is not adequately represented in clinical trials, research at the University of Cincinnati has shown.
CHOP researchers develop novel approach to capture hard-to-view portion of colon in 3D
In a groundbreaking discovery, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) developed a new imaging method that allows scientists to view the enteric nervous system (ENS) -- a key part of the human colon -- in three dimensions by making other colon cells that normally block it invisible.
Study unravels how our immune system deals with fungal and viral infections
The body's immune response to fungal infections changes when a patient is also infected by a virus, according to new research which investigated the two types of infection together for the first time.
Study finds artisanal CBD not as effective as pharmaceutical CBD for reducing seizures
Children and teens with epilepsy who were treated with pharmaceutical cannabidiol (CBD) had much better seizure control than those who were treated with artisanal CBD, according to a preliminary study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.
Climate change: Modeling the problem, searching for solutions
At the 2020 American Physical Society March Meeting in Denver, researchers will share their climate work, including: decoding the climate system's behavior, a new approach to climate modeling, a novel material that can morph from cornstarch to industrial plastic and then back into an edible again, using satellite imaging to promote high-yield organic farming, and making the case for innovation via nuclear sources to create cheaper carbon-free energy.
Imaging can guide whether liquid biopsy will benefit individual glioblastoma patients
New research shows brain imaging may be able to predict when a blood test known as a liquid biopsy would or would not produce clinically actionable information, allowing doctors to more efficiently guide patients to the proper next steps in their care.
Bacterium makes complex loops
A scientific team from the Biosciences and Biotechnology Institute of Aix-Marseille in Saint-Paul lez Durance, in collaboration with researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and the University of Göttingen, determined the trajectory and swimming speed of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus, known to move rapidly.
Astronomers detect biggest explosion in the history of the Universe
Scientists studying a distant galaxy cluster have discovered the biggest explosion seen in the Universe since the Big Bang.
Discovery of expanding pectin nanofilaments that manipulate plant cell shapes
Scientists have discovered new filamentous structures within plant cell walls that influence cell growth and help build complex three-dimensional cell shapes.
Baldness gene discovery reveals origin of hairy alpine plants
Scientists have solved a puzzle that has long baffled botanists -- why some plants on high mountainsides are hairy while their low-lying cousins are bald.
Additive boosts through a twist in the tail
Unconventional perovskites with an inverted structure see a leap in efficiency and longevity with an amine-based additive.
Genetic 'fingerprints' implicate gut bacterium in bowel cancer
A common type of bacteria found in our guts could contribute to bowel cancer, according to research funded by a £20 million Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge award and published in Nature today (Thursday).
Study: The opioid crisis may be far worse than we thought
New research appearing in the journal Addiction shows that the number of deaths attributed to opioid-related overdoses could be 28% higher than reported due to incomplete death records.
Citizen science and paddle surf to study microplastic pollution in Barcelona's coastline
A team of the University of Barcelona has studied for the first time the presence of microplastics in the coasts of Barcelona, with the collaboration of the citizens gathering scientific samples.
Could new discovery play a role in diagnosing Alzheimer's earlier?
Scientists have detected that a previously overlooked gene behavior could potentially lead to a new way to diagnose Alzheimer's earlier.
Skin and non-adhesive cells found to play pivotal role in the formation of fin
Human fingers are sculpted from a primitive pad-like structure during embryonic development.
First-ever pathology of the early phase of lung infection with the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)
An international team of clinicians and researchers for the first time have described the pathology of the SARS-CoV-2, or coronavirus, and published their findings in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.
How sound and visual effects on slot machines increase the allure of gambling
The sights and sounds of winning on a slot machine may increase your desire to play--and your memories of winning big, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.
Illinois study shows universally positive effect of cover crops on soil microbiome
Only a fraction of conventional row crop farmers grow cover crops after harvest, but a new global analysis from the University of Illinois shows the practice can boost soil microbial abundance by 27%.
Quantum researchers able to split one photon into three
Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo report the first occurrence of directly splitting one photon into three.
Wine glass size may influence how much you drink in restaurants
The size of glass used for serving wine can influence the amount of wine drunk, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge, funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR).
Using a cappella to explain speech and music specialization
Speech and music are two fundamentally human activities that are decoded in different brain hemispheres.
Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports.
Cells carrying Parkinson's mutation could lead to new model for studying disease
Parkinson's disease researchers have used gene-editing tools to introduce the disorder's most common genetic mutation into marmoset monkey stem cells and to successfully tamp down cellular chemistry that often goes awry in Parkinson's patients.
Mom's gut microbes affect newborn's metabolism, mouse models suggest
Using mouse models, scientists have discovered a mother's gut microbiota may shape the metabolism of her offspring, by providing environmental cues during pregnancy that fine tune energy homeostasis in the newborn's microbiome.
Thinning, prescribed burns protected forests during the massive Carlton Complex wildfire
In the first major study following the devastating 2014 Carlton Complex fire in north central Washington, researchers from the University of Washington and US Forest Service found that previous tree thinning and prescribed burns helped forests survive the fire.
SNIPRs take aim at disease-related mutations
In a new study, lead author Alex Green, a researcher at the Biodesign Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics and his colleagues describe a new method for detecting point mutations.
Telecommuting found to have little impact on corporate careers
Working from home is known to be good for a strong work-life balance.

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