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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 01, 2020


Promising drug could treat debilitating movement problems in people with Parkinson's
Results from a study looking at an experimental drug to tackle the debilitating side effect of dyskinesia, have offered hope that it may have potential as a future treatment for people with Parkinson's.
Speak math, not code
Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport.
Repeat antibiotic prescribing linked to higher risk of hospital admissions
Epidemiologists at the University of Manchester have discovered an association between the number of prescriptions for antibiotics and a higher risk of hospital admissions.
Are grandma, grandpa sleepy during the day? They may be at risk for diabetes, cancer, more
Older people who experience daytime sleepiness may be at risk of developing new medical conditions, including diabetes, cancer and high blood pressure, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.
Scientists seize rare chance to watch faraway star system evolve
Findings suggest that the planet DS Tuc Ab -- which orbits a star in a binary system -- formed without being heavily impacted by the gravitational pull of the second star.
Predicting intentional accounting misreporting
Taking a fine-tooth comb over the words in a firm's annual report, instead of the numbers, could better predict intentional misreporting, says SMU Assistant Professor Richard Crowley.

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