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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 03, 2020


Visceral fat delivers signal to the brain that hurts cognition
Excessive weight around our middle gives our brain's resident immune cells heavy exposure to a signal that turns them against us, setting in motion a crescendo of inflammation that damages cognition, scientists say.
New lithium batteries from used cell phones
Research from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and San Luis University (Argentina) was able to reuse graphite from cell phones to manufacture environmentally friendly batteries.
How a new quantum approach can develop faster algorithms to deduce complex networks
Complex networks are ubiquitous in the real world, from artificial to purely natural ones, and they exhibit very similar geometric properties.
The case for economics -- by the numbers
In recent years, criticism has been levelled at economics for being insular and unconcerned about real-world problems.
Mayo Clinic researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses
A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications.
It's what's inside that matters: Locking up proteins enables cancer metastasis
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that internalizing claudin-1 enables cancer cells to increase cell motility and to metastasize to lymph nodes.
Interplay between states and federal government in implementing the ACA
The fierce national debate over health care reform includes deep divisions over the appropriate roles of the federal and state governments.
Fast and furious: New class of 2D materials stores electrical energy
Like a battery,MXenes can store large amounts of electrical energy through electrochemical reactions- but unlike batteries,can be charged and discharged in a matter of seconds.
Artificial sweeteners combined with carbs may be more harmful than those sweeteners alone
The influence of artificial sweeteners on the brain and ultimately metabolism has been hotly debated in recent years.
How our brains create breathing rhythm is unique to every breath
Breathing propels everything we do -- so its rhythm must be carefully organized by our brain cells, right?
Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that unlike immunodeficiency viruses (IVs) that infect other primates, the IV that infects the greater spot-nosed monkey is able to antagonize human BST-2 to survive and proliferate.
IU scientists study link between energy levels, spinal cord injury
A team of researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, have investigated how boosting energy levels within damaged nerve fibers or axons may represent a novel therapeutic direction for axonal regeneration and functional recovery.
NASA sees ex-tropical cyclone Esther move back into northern territory
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds that have now moved over Australia's Northern Territory.
Study: PFAS Act similar to known cancer-causing chemicals
Scientists at the Environmental Working Group and Indiana University have for the first time conducted a review of 26 fluorinated chemicals, or PFAS, and found that all display at least one characteristic of known human carcinogens.
How do you make adhesives for electronics, vehicles, and construction tougher?
A Purdue University team, looking to make adhesives tougher, added bonds that are broken easily throughout the material.
Five-year survival improves for certain cancers in adolescent and young adults
The five-year survival rate for adolescents and young adults with cancer has significantly improved from 1975 to 2005 in the United States overall, but this was not the case for all cancers, according to a report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Nature Gene Therapy publishes preclinical data of Ocugen's OCU400 genetic modifier
Ocugen, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing transformative therapies to treat rare and underserved ophthalmic diseases, announced today the publication in Nature Gene Therapy of preclinical data of nuclear hormone receptor gene NR2E3 as a genetic modifier and therapeutic agent to treat multiple retinal degenerative diseases.
New Cas9 variant makes genome editing even more precise
Researchers develop more specific CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors.
Less than 20% of Americans have rapid access to endovascular thrombectomy for stroke
Timely treatment is critical for stroke victims, yet only 19.8% of the U.S. population can access a stroke center capable of endovascular thrombectomy to remove a large clot in 15 minutes or less by ambulance, according to researchers from UTHealth.
Plasma-driven biocatalysis
Compared with traditional chemical methods, enzyme catalysis has numerous advantages.
Coherent phonon dynamics realized in spatially separated mechanical resonators
The CAS Key Laboratory of Quantum Information realized coherent phonon manipulations within spatially separated mechanical resonators.
Nobody at home: A great increase in out-of-home rates over 28 years in Kumamoto, Japan
Researchers developed a new method of analyzing travel survey data to show that the rates of households in the Kumamoto, Japan metropolitan area with everyone out-of-home has increased from 41.3% in 1984 to 51.5% in 2012.
Unstable rock pillars near reservoirs can produce dangerous water waves
In many coastal zones and gorges, unstable cliffs often fail when the foundation rock beneath them is crushed.
Presence of staph bacteria in skin microbiome promotes netherton syndrome inflammation
Netherton syndrome is exacerbated by the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis living on human skin report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers.
Can't sleep? Prebiotics could help
New research shows that animals on a prebiotic diet sleep better and are buffered from the physiological impacts of stress.
How millets sustained Mongolia's empires
Researchers examined stable isotopes from bone collagen and dental enamel to reconstruct the diets of ancient Mongolians.
The origin of satiety: Brain cells that change shape after a meal
You just finished a good meal and are feeling full?
A joint venture at the nanoscale
Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory report fabricating and testing a superconducting nanowire device applicable to high-speed photon counting.
The brains of shrimps and insects are more alike than we thought
Crustaceans share a brain structure known to be crucial for learning and memory in insects, a University of Arizona-led research team discovered.
Study suggests blocking immune T-cell regulator may help eliminate tumours
Immune system T-cells are more able to destroy skin cancer cells when a T-cell regulator called SLAMF6 is missing, a new study in eLife shows.
Researchers develop new explanation for destructive earthquake vibrations
High-frequency vibrations are some of the most damaging ground movements produced by earthquakes, and Brown University researchers have a new theory about how they're produced.
Cell-based test shows potential to predict which drugs and chemicals cause birth defects
EPA's ToxCast TM program evaluated the developmental toxicity risk of 1,065 compounds using Stemina Biomarker Discovery's human cell-based devTOX quickPredict test (devTOXqP).
This wearable device camouflages its wearer no matter the weather
Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes -- a feat that current state of the art technology cannot match.
Blocking energy production in immune cells helps tumours escape treatment
A small molecule that inhibits energy production in immune T-cells allows some tumours to escape treatment with an immunotherapy called PD-1 blockade therapy, says a study in mice published today in eLife.
Chinese researchers detail chest CT findings in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia
This second article in the American Journal of Roentgenology's open-access series regarding the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a multi-center study (n=101) of the relationship between chest CT findings and the clinical conditions of COVID-19 pneumonia--which determined that most patients with the disease have ground-glass opacities (GGO) (86.1%) or mixed GGO and consolidation (64.4%) and vascular enlargement in the lesion (71.3%).
Study looks at EVALI findings in teens
The first study to examine both chest X-ray and CT imaging findings in teenagers with electronic (e-)cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) was published today in the journal Radiology.
Men can smell when a woman is sexually aroused
University of Kent research suggests that men can distinguish between the scents of sexually aroused and non-aroused women.
Starve a tumor, feed a cell: How cancers can resist drugs
With drug resistance a major challenge in the fight against cancer, a discovery by University of California, Irvine biologists could offer new approaches to overcoming the obstacle.
Why do men -- and other male animals -- tend to die younger? It's all in the Y chromosome
Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests.
SFU team helps discover potential superbug-killing compound
Researchers in Simon Fraser University's Brinkman Laboratory are collaborating with US researchers to test a new drug that can kill a wide range of superbugs -- including some bacteria now resistant to all common antibiotics.
Boosting energy levels within damaged nerves may help them heal
When the spinal cord is injured, the damaged nerve fibers -- called axons -- are normally incapable of regrowth, leading to permanent loss of function.
In US, changing self-concept can lower well-being
American culture values the freedom to change and reinvent one's self.
Anti-evolution drug could stop antibiotic resistance
The spread of antibiotic resistance is partly due to the ability of bacteria to pick up DNA from their surroundings.
A novel cause of fatty liver in lean people
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is mostly diagnosed in overweight and obese people.
Molecule found in oranges could reduce obesity and prevent heart disease and diabetes
Researchers at Western University are studying a molecule found in sweet oranges and tangerines called nobiletin, which they have shown to drastically reduce obesity and reverse its negative side-effects.
Monash researchers discover fainting disorder drug
Monash University researchers have revealed a novel therapy that corrects the mechanism in the body that's gone wrong in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), the condition affecting the former lead singer of The Wiggles.
'Optical tweezers' help in quest for better cancer treatments
In a groundbreaking new study, an interdisciplinary team of Michigan State University researchers has observed telomerase activity at a single-molecule level with unprecedented precision -- expanding our understanding of the vital enzyme and progressing toward better cancer treatments.
Apes' inner ears could hide clues to evolutionary history of hominoids
Studying the inner ear of apes and humans could uncover new information on our species' evolutionary relationships, suggests a new study published today in eLife.
Team sheds new light on design of inorganic materials for brain-like computing
Ever wish your computer could think like you do or perhaps even understand you?
How much does the drug industry spend on lobbying, campaign contributions?
What the pharmaceutical and health product industry spent on lobbying and contributions to political campaigns in the US from 1999 to 2018 was the focus of this observational study that used federal- and state-level data.
Pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis
Cannabis use is much more common among pregnant women with depression and pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis than those without depression.
What drug companies spend to bring a new drug to market
Researchers estimated the cost to bring 63 new drugs or biologics to market between 2009 and 2018 using publicly available data on research and development expenditures for these medicines.
The catch to putting warning labels on fake news
Study finds disclaimers on some false news stories make people more readily believe other false stories.
Research reveals best hospital-based methods for reducing readmission rates
Research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has revealed the most effective hospital-based methods for reducing readmission rates.
Optimizing use of the 'hug hormone' to help those with social difficulties
New research has provided important insight into how oxytocin could be administered in a more targeted and effective way to help treat social problems that occur in a range of psychiatric disorders.
New study: Low back and neck pain tops us health spending
Seeing a physician or other health specialist for low back and neck pain?
Drug development for rare diseases affecting children is increasing
The number of treatments for rare diseases affecting children has increased, a new study suggests.
Scientists shed light on mystery of dark matter
Nuclear physicists at the University of York are putting forward a new candidate for dark matter -- a particle they recently discovered called the d-star hexaquark.
We can make predictions about relationships - but is this necessary?
'Predictions as to the longevity of a relationship are definitely possible,' says Dr Christine Finn from the University of Jena.
New research reveals pharma companies are more profitable than most S&P 500 companies
Large pharmaceutical companies are more profitable than most companies in the S&P 500 according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
A PLOS Medicine special issue devoted to refugee and migrant health
This week, the open-access journal PLOS Medicine launches its latest special issue, focused on research and commentary about the health of refugees and migrants.
Red panda population genomics confirms two phylogenetic species and different evolutionary histories
A research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, used population genomics methods to analyze the genome resequencing data of 65 wild red pandas from seven geographical populations; mitochondrial genomes of 49 red pandas; and Y chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 49 male individuals.
Obtaining and observing single-molecule magnets on the silica surface
Following the latest research in the field of obtaining single-molecule magnets (SMMs), scientists have taken another step on the way toward obtaining super-dense magnetic memories and molecular neural networks, in particular the construction of auto-associative memories and multi-criterion optimization systems operating as the model of the human brain.
New telescope observations shed new light on black hole ejections
A black hole, ejecting material at close to the speed of light, has been observed using e-MERLIN, the UK's radio telescope array based at Jodrell Bank Observatory.
New tiny 44 million year old bird fossil links Africa and Asia to Utah
A new species of quail-sized fossil bird from 44 million year old sediments in Utah fills in a gap in the fossil record of the early extinct relatives of chickens and turkeys, and it shows strong links with other extinct species from Namibia in Southern Africa and Uzbekistan in Central Asia.
Dragonflies are efficient predators
A study led by the University of Turku, Finland, has found that small, fiercely predatory damselflies catch and eat hundreds of thousands of insects during a single summer -- in an area surrounding just a single pond.
Magnetic whirls in future data storage devices
Magnetic (anti)skyrmions are microscopically small whirls that are found in special classes of magnetic materials.
The IKBFU scientists created the first diamond x-ray micro lens
A diamond is a unique and expensive material. But it is almost indestructible which makes the lens made of it more economically profitable than metallic or polymeric ones in the long run.
Drug prices rose 3x faster than inflation over last decade, even after discounts
The net cost of prescription drugs -- meaning sticker price minus manufacturer discounts -- rose over three times faster than the rate of inflation over the course of a decade, according to a study published today in JAMA.
Coral reefs in Turks and Caicos Islands resist global bleaching event
A study that relied on citizen scientists to monitor the health of corals on Turks and Caicos Islands in the Caribbean from 2012 to 2018 found that 35 key coral species remained resilient during a 2014-17 global coral-bleaching event that harmed coral reefs around the world.
Ancient Australian trees face uncertain future under climate change, study finds
Tasmania's ancient rainforest faces a grim future as a warming climate and the way people used the land have brought significant changes to the island state off mainland Australia's southeastern coast, according to a new Portland State University study
Yale study may help resolve bitter debate over low-cal sweeteners
A new Yale study showed that people who periodically drank beverages with the low-calorie sweetener sucralose, which is found in low-cal soft drinks, candy, breakfast bars, and other products, did experience problematic metabolic and neural responses -- but only when a carbohydrate in the form of a tasteless sugar was added to the drink.
Gene variants may increase susceptibility to accumulate Alzheimer's protein tau
The toxic protein tau is a key biological feature in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers design new technology for targeted cancer drug delivery
A team of researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi has developed a biocompatible, biodegradable, and economical nanocarrier for safer and more effective delivery of anticancer drugs.
Influenza: combating bacterial superinfection with the help of the microbiota
Frenc researchers and from Brazilian (Belo Horizonte), Scottish (Glasgow) and Danish (Copenhagen) laboratories have shown for the first time in mice that perturbation of the gut microbiota caused by the influenza virus favours secondary bacterial superinfection.
Imaging technique reveals 3D forces exerted by tiny cell clusters
A new technique for mapping the forces that clusters of cells exert on their surroundings could be useful for studying everything from tissue development to cancer metastasis.
New tool aims to expedite military evacuation of civilians during crisis
A new computational model could be used to expedite military operations aimed at evacuating civilians during disaster response or humanitarian relief.
Profit-prediction system may lower suicide rates among indebted Indian farmers
Researchers at Penn State are taking steps to address the alarming rate of suicides among indebted farmers in India, by developing a deep-learning algorithm as the first step in a decision-support system that could predict future market values of crops.
Reef-building coral exhibiting 'disaster traits' akin to the last major extinction event
A new study in Scientific Reports shows that stony corals, which provide food and shelter for almost a quarter of all ocean species, are preparing for a major extinction event.
How computational linguistics helps to understand how language works
Distributional semantics obtains representations of the meaning of words by processing thousands of texts and extracting generalizations using computational algorithms.
With 30,000 surveys, researchers build the go-to dataset for smallholder farms
Household surveys are key to understanding smallholder farms but research organizations and development agencies did not always consider interoperability, complicating attempts for wide-scale data analysis.
Hydrogen sulfide heightens disease in tuberculosis, suggesting a new therapeutic target
A new culprit -- hydrogen sulfide -- has been found for the deadly infectious disease tuberculosis.
New DNA origami motor breaks speed record for nano machines
Through a technique known as DNA origami, scientists have created the fastest, most persistent DNA nano motor yet.
Research brief: Atomic-scale imaging reveals secret to thin film strength
An international team of scientists and engineers have made a discovery that could further advance the use of ultra-thin zeolite nanosheets, which are used as specialized molecular filters.
Jellyfish help understand the timing of egg production
In animals, releasing eggs in a timely manner is vital to maximize the chances of successful fertilization.
On the path toward non-addictive painkillers
Opioid-containing painkillers have severe side effects and have also been associated with extensive misuse, particularly in the United States.
Alzheimer's: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?
Scientists at the Laboratoire des Maladies Neurodégénératives (CNRS/CEA/Université Paris-Saclay) and the Neurocentre Magendie (INSERM/Université de Bordeaux) have just shown that a metabolic pathway plays a determining role in Alzheimer's disease's memory problems.
Two complete genome sequence for coronavirus in Brazil were published
With FAPESP's support, researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil, Adolfo Lutz Institute and Oxford University in the UK trained a laboratory team to use a low-cost sequencing technology even before the virus arrived in Brazil.
Changing the debate around obesity
The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist.
Cancer survival rates improve for young adults
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds improvements in five-year survival rates for all cancers in young adults.
US health care spending by payer, health conditions
A variety of data were used to estimate annual health care spending in the US from 1996 through 2016 by payer (public insurance, private insurance and out-of-pocket payments) and by health conditions, including low back pain and musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and ischemic heart disease.
Images of 'invisible' holes on cells may jumpstart research
Cellular pores, which were once invisible to biologists, have been imaged for the first time.
World's sandy beaches under threat from climate change
Half of the world's beaches could disappear by the end of the century due to coastal erosion, according to a new study led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.
Radiation therapy for colon cancer works better when specific protein blocked
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a way to make radiation therapy for colorectal cancer more effective by inhibiting a protein found in cancer cells in the gut.
Virtualized metamaterials opens door for acoustics application and beyond
Scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have realized what they called a virtualized acoustic metamaterial, in digitizing material response to an impulse response stored in a software program.
Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the survival and development of coral larvae in their first few days of life was negatively affected by elevated nutrients and a modest increase in water temperature.
New version of Earth model captures detailed climate dynamics
DOE laboratories are collaborating on a new high-resolution Earth systems model to predict climate trends into the next century.
Coordination chemistry and Alzheimer's disease
It has become evident recently that the interactions between copper and amyloid-β neurotoxically impact the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease.
For anxious spouses, a baby may be a rival
A new child can spark feelings of jealousy in a person who already fears being abandoned by his or her partner, research suggests.
More than 60% of Myanmar's mangroves has been deforested in the last 20 years: NUS study
New research from the National University of Singapore showed that between 1996 and 2016, substantial mangrove forests have been converted to agricultural use in Myanmar.
Drinking weakens bones of people living with HIV: BU study
For people living with HIV, any level of alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, raising the risk of osteoporosis, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
Advances in computer modeling, protein development propel cellular engineering
A review of recent work in biophysics highlights efforts in cellular engineering, ranging from proteins to cellular components to tissues grown on next-generation chips.
Study explores sexual harassment at AADR conferences
The research assessed perceptions and experiences related to sexual, gender-based and nongender-based harassment among registrants at AADR annual meetings from 2015 to 2018 (n=10,495); examined demographic factors associated with reported experiences; and identified facilitators and potential solutions concerning these types of harassment.
Profits of large pharmaceutical companies compared to other large public companies
Data from annual financial reports were used to compare the profitability of 35 large pharmaceutical companies with 357 companies in the S&P 500 Index from 2000 to 2018.
Caesarean birth has little impact on children developing allergies
A caesarean birth had little impact on whether a child would go onto develop allergies, a new study has shown.
Researchers link immune system to salt-sensitive hypertension in CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is linked to salt-sensitive hypertension.
Does your cat have degenerative joint disease?
With an estimated 10-15% of adults over the age of 60 having some degree of osteoarthritis, otherwise known as degenerative joint disease (DJD), many people will be familiar with, or will know someone who suffers from, this painful and debilitating condition.
Study can help identify cancer patients most likely to develop cachexia
Researchers in Brazil analyzed 12 types of tumor and established a gene expression profile associated with cachexia, a potentially fatal syndrome characterized by severe weight loss and muscle wasting.
Chemists inhibit a critical gear of cell immortality
Researchers have developed a promising molecular tool that targets and inhibits one of cell immortality's underlying gears: the enzyme telomerase.
Study links depressive symptoms during pregnancy with lowered immunity in infants
A woman's mental health during pregnancy has a direct influence on the development of her child's immune system, according to a new study from pediatric researchers at the University of Alberta.
New way to identify patients likely to return to hospital could reduce future readmissions
A new study looked at how the risk of readmission progressed over multiple visits to emergency departments (EDs) by patients with chronic diseases.
Does consuming fruit during pregnancy improve cognition in babies?
Study by UAlberta scientists explores in greater depth the effect on infant cognition of drinking fruit juice while pregnant.
Study homes in on possible cause of sudden cardiac deaths
By studying the sick hearts removed from four patients undergoing heart transplants, researchers have identified a protein and a signaling pathway that may contribute to sudden death in an inherited form of heart disease.
BAT study shows new vaping technology significantly reduces exposure to toxicants
A vapor product that contains new-to-world technology has significantly fewer and lower levels of certain toxicants compared to cigarette smoke, a study has shown.
ACTG to present new HIV and TB research at CROI 2020
ACTG investigators will present data in oral presentations and themed discussions on the impact of chronic antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a novel metric of the HIV reservoir, predictors of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in resource-limited settings, findings from the first HIV cure trial that exclusively enrolled women, and interactions between contraceptives and TB drugs and the vaginal microbiome.
Texas A&M researchers develop flooding prediction tool
By incorporating the architecture of city drainage systems and readings from flood gauges into a comprehensive statistical framework, researchers at Texas A&M University can now accurately predict the evolution of floods in extreme situations like hurricanes.
New technology helps reduce salt, keep flavor
A new processing technology out of Washington State University called microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) could make it possible to reduce sodium while maintaining safety and tastiness.
Tunnel fire safety
With only minutes to respond, fire education really counts.
Simulations show fundamental interactions inside the cell
Actin filaments have several important functions inside cells. For one, they support the cell membrane by binding to it.
Study reveals properties of cells fated to relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Researchers have found that genetically defined subpopulations of leukemia cells present at diagnosis have distinct characteristics that lead to relapse.
Study suggests guidelines to improve youtube videos on chronic health care conditions
A new study sought to understand how people engage with health information in YouTube videos on diabetes.
UH Hilo professor's marine animal biodiversity research featured in Science
New study on animal biodiversity patterns on the planet compiled by a team of researchers led by UH Hilo's biology department featured in Science.
Plastic from wood
The biopolymer lignin is a by-product of papermaking and a promising raw material for manufacturing sustainable plastic materials.
Biologically inspired ultrathin arrayed camera for high-contrast and high-resolution imaging
The vision systems in nature provide intriguing optical design inspiration for ultracompact imaging systems.
Changes in drug prices, discounts in US
This study describes changes in list and net prices for 600 branded drugs in the US from 2007 to 2018 and estimated the extent to which price increases were offset by increases in discounts.
Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind our desire for revenge
New insight on the neural processes that drive a desire for revenge during conflict between groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
Hope for a new permanent magnet that's cheap and sustainable
Scientists have made a breakthrough in the search for a new, sustainable permanent magnet.
Study identifies regional malnutrition clusters across India
Childhood malnutrition in India remains a major problem. A new study shows that the problem is concentrated in specific geographic areas, which could help policymakers working to address the issue.
Scientists created an 'impossible' superconducting compound
Scientists have created new superconducting compounds of hydrogen and praseodymium, a rare-earth metal, one substance being quite a surprise from the perspective of classical chemistry.
SwRI fire study reveals how country, code variations impact escape time
Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) conducted room burn comparisons to better understand how country-specific fire codes in the U.S., France and the United Kingdom affect the fire safety of home furnishings and their contributions to flashover.
New model shows winners, losers among marine microbes in warming oceans
A changing climate is warming oceans, creating winners and losers among plankton and algae at the base of the food chain.
Not only what you eat, but how you eat, may affect your microbiome
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that post-stroke patients re-grow a healthy microbiota in their mouth and gut when they revert to normal food intake from tube feeding.
Why is the female wallaby always pregnant?
Researchers show that female swamp wallabies ovulate, mate, and form a new embryo prepartum, while continuously supporting conceptuses and young at different development stages before and after birth.
Graphene, perovskites, and silicon -- an ideal tandem for efficient solar cells
Graphene Flagship researchers successfully combined graphene with tandem perovskite-silicon solar cells to achieve efficiencies of up to 26.3%.
The CNIO discovers that rapamycin has harmful effects when telomeres are short
The CNIO shows that an anti-aging strategy that extends life in normal mice, the treatment with rapamycin, is harmful when mice have short telomeres.
Improved CRISPR gene drive solves problems of old tech
Gene drives use genetic engineering to create a desired mutation in a few individuals that then spreads via mating throughout a population in fewer than 10 generations.
Manipulating atoms to make better superconductors
A new study by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it is possible to manipulate individual atoms so that they begin working in a collective pattern that has the potential to become superconducting at higher temperatures.
Obesity promotes virulence of influenza
Obesity promotes the virulence of the influenza virus, according to a study conducted in mice published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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