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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 04, 2020


Newfound cell defense system features toxin-isolating 'sponges'
A 'decoy' mechanism has been found in human and animal cells to protect them from potentially dangerous toxins released by foreign invaders, such as bacteria.
High energy Li-Ion battery is safer for electric vehicles
A lithium-ion battery that is safe, has high power and can last for 1 million miles has been developed by a team in Penn State's Battery and Energy Storage Technology (BEST) Center.
Using ultrasound localization microscopy to detect oxygen levels in tissues
A new study led by Pengfei Song, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois, uses ultrasound localization microscopy to measure blood vessel distribution and oxygen levels in chicken embryos.
Robot uses artificial intelligence and imaging to draw blood
Rutgers engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs.
Coronavirus treatment and risk to breastfeeding women
Little data is available about the ability of antiviral drugs used to treat COVID-19, coronavirus, to enter breastmilk, let alone the potential adverse effects on breastfeeding infants.
New model improves management of wetland, floodplain and river habitats
Engineers have developed a unique computer model that may help predict strategies that improve the quality and size of aquatic, floodplain and wetland habitats.
A model proposed for predicting photodamage and development of plant protection mechanisms
Light is the main source of energy for photosynthesis, it underlies the production process in plants.
Researchers pinpoint mechanism controlling cell protein traffic
New research, published Feb. 26 in Nature Communications, identifies an enzyme -- N-terminal glycine myristoyltransferases (NMT) 1 and 2 -- which adds lysine myristoylation to a key protein.
New analysis highlights impact of poverty and exploitation on children's lives
The damaging impact of poverty on children and their families and the growing problem of exploitation are revealed in a new report by researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Warwick.
New study finds inaccuracies in arsenic test kits in Bangladesh
Researchers at the University of Michigan have raised serious concerns with the performance of some arsenic test kits commonly used in Bangladesh to monitor water contamination.
Micromotors get supercharged with three 'engines'
Someday, microscopic robots could perform useful functions, such as diagnostic testing in lab-on-a-chip sensors, micropatterning surfaces or repairing equipment in tight spaces.
SMART announces revolutionary new process for scientific applications
Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National University Singapore (NUS) have developed a unique method for generating and processing fluid droplets under previously unattainable conditions, providing an affordable and accessible way for chemical and biological reactions to take place in a completely isolated environment.
Waves and tides have bigger impact on marine life than human activity
The biggest impacts on the sea life in Swansea Bay (Wales) come from waves and tides rather than human activity, a wide-ranging new study -- encompassing over 170 species of fish and other sea life such as crabs, squid and starfish -- has revealed.
AI may help spot newborns at risk for most severe form of blinding disease
An artificial intelligence (AI) device that has been fast-tracked for approval by the Food and Drug Administration may help identify newborns at risk for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (AP-ROP).
The health of coral reefs in the largest marine protected area in the world
Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation have published their findings from extensive coral and reef fish surveys conducted on the Global Reef Expedition in the Cook Islands.
Certain factors predict smoking cessation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
Smoking doubles the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis and continuing to smoke after being diagnosed has negative effects on patients.
New measure for excessive buying problems
Excessive or uncontrolled buying or shopping is a highly prevalent, disabling and growing problem, yet measuring the extent and effects of this significant psychological problem and social issue remains problematic.
Zigzag DNA
How the cell organizes DNA into tightly packed chromosomes. Nature publication by Delft University of Technology and EMBL Heidelberg.
Risks of later abortions on subsequent births
New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica indicates that a prior induced abortion poses only a very small risk of negative effects on births from subsequent pregnancies, but the risk is higher if the abortion is performed later in the pregnancy.
Researchers catalog dozens of mutations in crucial brain development gene
An international team of researchers that pooled genetic samples from developmentally disabled patients from around the world has identified dozens of new mutations in a single gene that appears to be critical for brain development.
Novel compound sparks new malaria treatment hope
A novel class of antimalarial compounds that can effectively kill malaria parasites has been developed by Australian and US researchers.
New type of indoor solar cells for smart connected devices
In a future where most things in our everyday life are connected through the internet, devices and sensors will need to run without wires or batteries.
City of Hope creates innovative platform for landmark study, opening data to more people
A $12 million federal grant enabled City of Hope and collaborators to deploy a novel cloud-computing platform, making an immense amount of data from a historic 25-year study more accessible and user-friendly.
Bereaved individuals may face higher risk of dying from melanoma
Individuals who experience the loss of a partner are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma but face an increased risk of dying from the disease, according to research published in the British Journal of Dermatology.
How loneliness affects end-of-life experiences
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of Americans over age 50 years who died between 2004 and 2014, individuals who were characterized as lonely based on survey results were burdened by more symptoms and received more intense end-of-life care compared with non-lonely people.
Expanding the plasmonic painter's palette
By blending paints in their palette, artists can create a broad spectrum of colors with subtly different hues.
All optical control of exciton flow in a colloidal quantum well complex
Excitonics, an alternative to electronics, is becoming more promising for processing information since semiconductor electronics is rapidly approaching the end of Moore's law.
How a magnet could help boost understanding of superconductivity
Physicists have unraveled a mystery behind the strange behavior of electrons in a ferromagnet, a finding that could eventually help develop high temperature superconductivity.
Third-hand smoke is no joke, can convey hazardous chemicals
People can carry hazardous compounds from cigarette smoke that cling to their bodies and clothes and then release those compounds into non-smoking environments -- exposing people nearby to cigarettes' adverse effects, a new study shows.
Fisherwomen contribute tonnes of fish, billions of dollars to global fisheries
Fishing (particularly commercial fishing) is considered a male-dominated realm but it turns out that the 3 million tonnes of fish per year that women catch add up to $5.6 billion or the equivalent of 12% of the landed value of all small-scale fisheries catches globally.
Weight loss surgery may increase fracture risk
Individuals who undergo weight loss surgery may face an elevated risk of bone fractures, according to a study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.
Rapid DNA test quickly identifies victims of mass casualty event
To quickly identify victims of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California's history, researchers used a technique called Rapid DNA Identification that can provide results within hours, compared with months to years required of conventional DNA analysis.
Breastfeeding and risks of allergies and asthma
In an Acta Paediatrica study, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 3 months was linked with a lower risk of respiratory allergies and asthma when children reached 6 years of age.
Does antibiotic use during pregnancy and infancy impact childhood obesity?
New findings published in Obesity reveal that use of antibiotics during pregnancy does not appear to affect children's weight in subsequent years, but use during infancy may increase their risk of becoming overweight or obese.
Biomaterial discovery enables 3D printing of tissue-like vascular structures
An international team of scientists have discovered a new material that can be 3D printed to create tissue-like vascular structures.
Workplace program to improve blood pressure control
This randomized clinical trial conducted at 60 workplaces in urban ares of China examined whether a wellness program with a hypertension management component would improve blood pressure control among employees compared to usual care.
Teaming basic scientists with clinicians may improve medical education retention
There is a trend in modern medical school curriculum design to integrate the basic sciences and clinical sciences.
New insights into evolution: Why genes appear to move around
Scientists at Uppsala University have proposed an addition to the theory of evolution that can explain how and why genes move on chromosomes.
UC San Diego synthetic biologists redesign the way bacteria 'talk' to each other
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have redesigned how harmless E. coli bacteria ''talk'' to each other.
Examining risk of violent assault among young immigrants, refugees in Canada
This population-based study describes the risk of experiencing violent assault among young immigrants and refugees (ages 10 to 24) compared with nonimmigrants in an analysis of  linked health and administrative databases in Ontario, Canada.
Lung diseases linked to higher rheumatoid arthritis risk
Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were each associated with increased risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis in a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.
Bristol scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C
Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory.
High-tech contact lenses correct color blindness
Researchers have incorporated ultra-thin optical devices known as metasurfaces into off-the-shelf contact lenses to correct deuteranomaly, a form of red-green color blindness.
Young women with breast cancer may face financial hardship after diagnosis
Young women with breast cancer experienced substantial financial difficulties in the wake of a breast cancer diagnosis, even if they had stable jobs with insurance benefits.
FSU researchers propose new physics to explain decay of subatomic particle
FSU researchers published new research that suggests reported decays of a Kaon by the Koto experiment may actually be new particles.
Fighting hand tremors: First comes AI, then robots
Robots hold promise for a large number of people with neurological movement disorders severely affecting the quality of their lives.
Zombie scanning enables the study of peptide-receptor interactions on the cell surface
In the past, biologically-active peptides -- small proteins like neurotoxins and hormones that act on cell receptors to alter physiology -- were purified from native sources like venoms and then panels of variants were produced in bacteria, or synthesized, to study the structural basis for receptor interaction.
Electrical stimulation helps treat constipation in clinical trial
Electrical stimulation benefited women with constipation in a recent clinical trial published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.
Studies show number of US medical students with disabilities grows, but disparities continue
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that the number of disabled students admitted to US medical schools rose from 2.9% to 4.9% over the last three years.
Our eye movements help us retrieve memories, suggests a new Baycrest study
In a recent study, scientists at Baycrest's Rotman Research Institute (RRI) found that research participants moved their eyes to determine whether they had seen an image before, and that their eye movement patterns could predict mistakes in memory.
DNA sugars characterised in unprecedented resolution, atom by atom
For the cover of its latest issue the ACS Central Science journal has selected a piece of work conducted by the Spectroscopy Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, and the Biofisika Institute (CSIC - UPV/EHU).
Family history of heart disease makes premature removal of ovaries especially risky
Women who proactively have their ovaries removed to minimize their cancer risk may face a greater risk--premature death because of heart disease.
The persistence of pay inequality: The gender pay gap in an anonymous online labor market
The US is witnessing a dramatic rise in nontraditional 'gig economy' labor markets.
Real-world evidence empowers personalized decisions about weight-loss surgery
The PCORnet Bariatric Study provides real-world evidence from analyses of tens of thousands of patient records that helps people considering weight-loss surgery to weigh the tradeoffs of the two main surgical procedures and make personalized decisions on which is best for them.
Digital heart model will help predict future heart health, new study finds
In recent times, researchers have increasing found that the power of computers and artificial intelligence is enabling more accurate diagnosis of a patient's current heart health and can provide an accurate projection of future heart health, potential treatments and disease prevention.
First bufferless 1.5 μm III-V lasers grown directly on silicon wafers in Si-photonics
Researchers from HKUST have reported the world's first 1.5 μm III-V lasers directly grown on the industry-standard 220 nm SOI (silicon-on-insulators) wafers without buffer, potentially paving an opening to the 'holy grail' for present silicon (Si-) photonics research.
Birds of a feather better not together
A new study of North American birds from Washington University in St.
Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism
Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Hypertension in young adulthood associated with cognitive decline in middle age
Research from Tel Aviv University indicates that high blood pressure in young adulthood is associated with cognitive decline and gait impairment in middle age.
Flower faithful native bee makes a reliable pollinator
Entomologists at UC Riverside have documented that a common species of native sweat bee feeds on the same plant species in a given area repeatedly, making it a reliable pollinator.
Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found.
UCF study: Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial
The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100.
New platform for cancer diagnostics and drug testing
Parts of tumor tissue, which is normally discarded in cancer surgery, bear information about the disease.
Destruction of an Atlantic rain forest fragment raises the local temperature
Brazilian researchers show that if 25% of a one-hectare forest remnant is cut down, the impact on the local climate will be a temperature increase of 1 °C.
CABI scientists help discover new biological control for noxious parthenium weed in Pakistan
CABI scientists, as part of an international team of researchers, have discovered a new biological control in the fight against the highly noxious and invasive weed parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) in Pakistan.
Using molecules to draw on quantum materials
Over millennia, civilizations progressed through the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages.
Study shows low carb diet may prevent, reverse age-related effects within the brain
A study using neuroimaging led by Stony Brook University professor and lead author Lilianne R.
Platinum-based agents not superior to standard chemotherapy
BIDMC clinician-researchers provide new evidence about the optimal way to treat patients who carry BRCA mutations who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.
Dental teams could play an important role in early diagnosis of Type 2 and pre-diabetes
Dental professionals could play a vital role in the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes as well as identifying those at a high risk of developing the condition, new research by a team at the University of Birmingham's School of Dentistry has found.
Even fake illness affects relationships among vampire bats
How do social interactions change in the face of illness?
Tropical forests' carbon sink is already rapidly weakening
The ability of the world's tropical forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is decreasing, according to a study tracking 300,000 trees over 30 years, published today in Nature.
UArizona study identifies hormone that causes women to experience more pain than men
A University of Arizona Health Sciences research team led by Dr.
Mother nose best: Child body odor provides olfactory clues to developmental stages
A child's body odor can help a mother fall in love with her child -- and signal when it's time for the mother-child bond to grow up.
Sensitivity to low flow
Researchers are using a new method to determine how resistant rivers are to drought.
Impact of obesity on ability to work highest amongst women over 50
New research has shown that older workers with obesity are at a higher risk of prolonged sickness absence or losing their jobs for health reasons than those of normal weight, with women affected significantly more than men.
Why runner's addiction is adding to your injury woes
Each week, millions of runners around the world lace up their running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers.
Scientists discover new repair mechanism for alcohol-induced DNA damage
Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in Utrecht, The Netherlands, and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, United Kingdom, have discovered a new way in which the human body repairs DNA damage caused by a degradation product of alcohol.
Researchers gather interventions addressing 'word gap' into special edition of journa
Investigators at the University of Kansas edited a special issue of Early Childhood Research Quarterly gathering 18 language-intervention research and empirical studies that address the word gap.
Researchers identify ways to improve care to trafficked children
Newly published research by a CU School of Medicine faculty member and colleagues identifies multiple ways that health care providers and organizations can improve the quality of care provided to trafficked children.
Researchers identify novel cybersecurity approach to protect Army systems
Researchers at the Army's corporate laboratory in collaboration with the University of California, Riverside have identified an approach to network security that will enhance the effectiveness and timeliness of protection against adversarial intrusion and evasion strategies.
Being overweight may raise your risk for advanced prostate cancer
A new study links being overweight in middle age and later adulthood to a greater risk of advanced prostate cancer.
Decades-old antidepressant may fend off prostate cancer's return
An antidepressant from the '50s, repurposed to fight prostate cancer, lowered PSA levels in men with recurrent disease, pilot study shows.
Diabetes remission rates after 2 common weight-loss surgeries
Researchers examined associations between two of the most common weight-loss surgeries on type 2 diabetes outcomes by comparing diabetes remission and relapse rates, glycemic control and weight loss after five years among 9,700 adults with type 2 diabetes who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy.
Sulfonated chitosan studied as potential biodegradable corrosion inhibitor
Hydrate formation has long been a problem for hydrocarbon production in the Arctic.
Nanoscale spectroscopy review showcases a bright future
A new review authored by international leaders in their field, and published in Nature, focuses on the luminescent nanoparticles at the heart of many advances and the opportunities and challenges for these technologies to reach their full potential.
A small step for atoms, a giant leap for microelectronics
Rice materials scientist Boris Yakobson and colleagues in Taiwan and China report in Nature on making large single-crystal sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, touted as a key insulator in future two-dimensional electronics.
Diversity semantics shift higher ed inclusivity away from students of color
Affirmative action in higher education was originally meant to rebalance the scales of mostly-white, mostly-male institutions.
Bilingualism acts as a cognitive reserve factor against dementia
The conclusions of a study carried out by Víctor Costumero, as the first author, Marco Calabria and Albert Costa (died in 2018), members of the Speech Production and Bilingualism (SPB) group at the Cognition and Brain Center (CBC) of the Department of Information Technology and the Communications (DTIC) of the UPF, together with researchers from the Universities of Jaume I, Valencia, Barcelona and Jaén; IDIBELL, Hospital La Fe (Valencia) and Grupo Médico ERESA (Valencia).
Honeybee dance dialects
Honeybees use their waggle dance to tell their conspecifics where to find food.
Oncotarget; Inducible knock-out of BCL6 in lymphoma cells results in tumor stasis
The cover for issue 9 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'BCL6 knock-out in a DLBCL xenograft induces tumor stasis,' by Schlager, et al.
Research brief: Energy researchers invent error-free catalysts
A team of researchers have invented oscillating catalyst technology that can accelerate chemical reactions without side reactions or chemical errors.
A new model of vision
MIT researchers have developed a computer model of face processing that could reveal how the brain produces richly detailed visual representations so quickly.
Yale researchers help restore hormonal balance disrupted in metabolic diseases
Many health problems in the developed world stem from the disruption of a delicate metabolic balance between glucose production and energy utilization in the liver.
Researchers identify breaking point of conducting material
An improved method to predict the temperature when plastics change from supple to brittle, which could potentially accelerate future development of flexible electronics, was developed by Penn State College of Engineering researchers.
March Madness bracket analysis shows picking final four first leads to better brackets
Data science researchers at the University of Illinois have some March Madness advice based on new research: Pick top-seeded teams as the Final Four in your March Madness bracket and work backward and forward from there.
Cover crops can benefit hot, dry soils
Soil gets more than just 'cover' from cover crops.
Supercomputers drive ion transport research
Kinetics of solute transport through nanoporous membranes captured through supercomputer simulations.
Travel history should become routine in medical assessments to slow pandemics' spread
Integrating travel history information into routine medical assessments could help stem the rapidly widening COVID-19 epidemic, as well as future pandemics, infectious disease specialists recommend in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
Adding MRI-targeted biopsy leads to more reliable diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer
Using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to target and sample suspicious prostate tissue along with a standard prostate biopsy is significantly more likely to detect the most aggressive prostate cancers than standard biopsy alone.
Safe tackling, padded helmets lower head injuries in youth football
Middle school football players greatly reduce the chance of head injuries if they wear padded helmets and use safe tackling and blocking techniques, according to Rutgers researchers.
Scorpions make a fluorescent compound that could help protect them from parasites
Most scorpions glow a blue-green color when illuminated by ultraviolet light or natural moonlight.
'Triangle 2' plastic containers may see environmental makeover
Cornell chemists can demonstrate how to make high-density polyethylene with better control over polymer chain lengths, which allows for improvement over physical properties such as processability and strength, according to research published Dec.
Neanderthal migration
At least two different groups of Neanderthals lived in Southern Siberia and an international team of researchers including scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that one of these groups migrated from Eastern Europe.
Study find delta helps to decrease the impact of river flooding
Most coastal cities and ports face a double threat from storm surge and river flooding.
Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes
MIT researchers have invented a way to integrate 'breadboards' -- flat platforms widely used for electronics prototyping -- directly onto physical products.
Gold-coated pantyhose inspire a technique for comfortable light-emitting clothing
An approach for developing light-emitting fabric based on typical ultrasheer pantyhose coated in a thin gold film may enable the development of softer, more wearable luminous clothing, researchers in Canada report March 4 in the journal Matter.
New material could turn clothing into a health monitor
Researchers have reported a new material, pliable enough to be woven into fabric but imbued with sensing capabilities that can serve as an early warning system for injury or illness.
Moviegoers contaminate nonsmoking movie theater with 'thirdhand' cigarette smoke
Suggesting that current non-smoking regulations may not be enough to minimize nonsmokers' exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke, researchers report that concentrations of nicotine and smoking-related volatile organic compounds spiked when moviegoers entered a well-ventilated, non-smoking movie theater, exposing them to the equivalent of between one and
Regenerative nerve interface enhances precision and durability of hand prostheses
Researchers have found that a new nerve interface technology endows upper limb amputees with greater control and precision when using prosthetic hands.
Women deflated by #Fitspiration images
Researchers have found that the #Fitspiration philosophy is flawed, making many women feel worse about themselves and their bodies rather than inspiring them to exercise.
Better planning could save millions in health care costs
New research from Michigan State University and Rutgers University reveals the amount of money washed away in hospital operating rooms, offering solutions to save hospitals -- and the country -- millions of dollars each year.
Genome editing strategy could improve rice, other crops
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have used CRISPR technology to genetically engineer rice with high levels of beta-carotene, the precursor of vitamin A.
Almost alien: Antarctic subglacial lakes are cold, dark and full of secrets
More than half of the planet's fresh water is in Antarctica.
New evidence supports ablation for heart failure patients with atrial fibrillation
Only 1 in 13 everyday patients could have participated in a pivotal international clinical trial looking at the use of catheter ablation to treat atrial fibrillation (AFib) among people with heart failure.
Study examines potential link between partner bereavement and skin cancer
Psychological stress has been proposed as a risk factor for melanoma, but clinical evidence is limited.
Study reveals improving survival rates after liver transplantation in the UK
In the past two decades, death rates after liver transplantation have dropped by more than half in the UK, according to a recent analysis of almost 10,000 liver transplant recipients published in BJS (British Journal of Surgery).
Book on plants in the Murmansk region (Russia) scores 4/19 correct insect identifications
Mistakes can occur in any environment, but what if the records we read about are actually incorrect?
Car congestion outweighs scooter scourge on city streets
'Scooter clutter' has been a concern amplified by media reports in urban areas where micromobility has entered the landscape, with large numbers of dockless scooters and shared e-bikes on city streets and sidewalks.
NASA tracks ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther over Northern Territory
NASA's Aqua satellite continues to provide forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds and storms, now over the Barkly Region of Australia's Northern Territory.
Multi-country study reveals shortcomings in treating obesity
To address obesity worldwide, changes are needed in both the availability of treatments and the attitudes of clinicians.
Exciting apparatus helps atoms see the light
Researchers in the Light-Matter Interactions for Quantum Technologies Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have generated Rydberg atoms - unusually large excited atoms - near nanometer-thin optical fibers.
A talented 2D material gets a new gig
Berkeley Lab scientists have designed a tunable graphene device for experiments in exotic physics, where superconducting, insulating, and magnetic properties can be observed in a single system.
As farming developed, so did cooperation -- and violence
The growth of agriculture led to unprecedented cooperation in human societies, a team of researchers, has found, but it also led to a spike in violence, an insight that offers lessons for the present.
HIV reservoirs in humans: Immediate antiretroviral therapy makes them 100 times smaller
Thanks to an unprecedented access to blood, and biopsies of rectums and lymph nodes of people at the earliest stages of HIV infection, an international team of researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), the US Military HIV Research Program and the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre has shown that the first established reservoirs are still 'sensitive' during these early stages and could be downsized about 100 times upon immediate ART initiation.
Automated CT biomarkers predict cardiovascular events better than current practice
Researchers at the NIH and University of Wisconsin demonstrated that using artificial intelligence to analyze CT scans can produce more accurate risk assessment for major cardiovascular events than current, standard methods such as the Framingham risk score and body-mass index.

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