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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 05, 2020


Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units.
Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities.
Artificial Intelligence to improve the precision of mammograms
The Artificial Intelligence techniques, used in combination with evaluations by expert radiologists, improve the precision in the detection of cancer through mammograms.
Drug that keeps surface receptors on cancer cells makes them more visible to immune cells
A drug that is already clinically available for the treatment of nausea and psychosis, called prochlorperazine (PCZ), inhibits the internalization of receptors on the surface of tumor cells, thereby increasing the ability of anticancer antibodies to bind to the receptors and mount more effective immune responses.
Unexpected discovery: Blue-green algae produce oil
Cyanobacteria -- colloquially also called blue-green algae - can produce oil from water and carbon dioxide with the help of light.
New drug combination could support better cancer treatments
Researchers have identified a promising new drug combination that could significantly help the immune system target cancer cells and kill them.
All-solid-state lithium-sulfur batteries with high capacity and long life
Toyohashi University of Technology researchers have made an active sulfur material and carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite using a low-cost and straightforward liquid phase process.
Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process
Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two hours and the whole identification process within eight hours.
Mapping movement
Our day-to-day lives can be seen as a series of complex motor sequences: morning routines, work or school tasks, actions we take around mealtimes, the rituals and habits woven through our evenings and weekends.
Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health.
Severe peanut allergy may be a 'gut reaction'
A new study of 19 people who suffer from peanut allergy found an abundance of allergy-causing immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in the gut, providing valuable insights into the mechanisms of severe allergies to peanuts and other foods, which together affect as much as 6% of the US population.
Using artificial intelligence to assess ulcerative colitis
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed an artificial intelligence system with a deep neural network that can effectively evaluate endoscopic data from patients with ulcerative colitis, which is a type of inflammatory bowel disease, without the need for biopsy collection.
Is life a game of chance?
To help answer one of the great existential questions -- how did life begin?
Using holograms helps in studying the quality of composite materials
Composite materials have a complicated structure and specified mechanical or physical properties.
Rats avoid to hurt other rats
In a new paper published in the leading scientific journal Current Biology, a team of neuroscientists of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience shows that male and female rats show harm aversion.
Research shows microplastics are damaging to coral ecosystems
Coral endosymbionts exposed to microplastics experience significant reduction in population size as well as cell size.
Heart attack patients who follow more guidelines live longer
Patients who followed more medical advice after a heart attack were more likely to survive years after their heart attack.
City fox and country fox
Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Luxembourg National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) analysed genetic material of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) inhabiting Berlin and its surroundings.
Scientists monitored brains replaying memories in real time
In a study of epilepsy patients, researchers at the National Institutes of Health monitored the electrical activity of thousands of individual brain cells, called neurons, as patients took memory tests.
Male privilege
Employees who have 'upgraded' their professional knowledge and skills find it easier to manage problems both in their personal lives and in the workplace.
Social studies teachers link their political views to assessment of news sources
At a time when there's been a sharp uptick in partisan critiques of the credibility of the news media and growing concern among educators about student media literacy, a new study finds a strong connection between high school social studies teachers' political ideology and how credible they find various mainstream news outlets.
Self-driving car trajectory tracking gets closer to human-driver ideal
Have you taken an Uber ride and disagreed with the 'fastest' route that the GPS app suggested because you or the driver know a 'better' way?
Children with food protein-induced enterocolitis more likely to have other allergies
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that children with a rare food allergy known as food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, or FPIES, have a significantly higher chance of being diagnosed with other allergic conditions, including eczema, traditional food allergy and asthma.
Longest microwave quantum link
Physicists at ETH Zurich have demonstrated a five-metre-long microwave quantum link, the longest of its kind date.
Balancing bushmeat trade and conservation vital to ensure livelihoods not threatened
Local communities in the Congo rainforest have been working with researchers from the University of York in a bid to balance the bushmeat trade with conservation.
Scientists create model to predict multipathogen epidemics
In one of the first studies of its kind, bioscientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have shown how to use the interactions between pathogens in individual hosts to predict the severity of multipathogen epidemics.
MacMillan illuminates the micro-environment, creating a new path to cancer drugs
A team of Princeton chemists has identified a way to tag a protein's nearest molecular neighbors, enabling the precise mapping of their micro-environment.
Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change's effects on kelp
Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage.
Novel sepsis treatment enhances bacterial capture by neutrophil 'traps'
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel treatment for sepsis - one of the leading causes of hospital death - that enhances the body's bacteria-capturing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) so that they more effectively capture infectious bacteria, resist degradation, and improve sepsis outcomes and survival.
PET imaging offers new insights into post-transplant care for heart patients
Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) have been identified as accurate indicators for graft failure after cardiac transplantation, according to research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
Wuhan CT scans reliable for coronavirus (COVID-19) diagnosis, limited for differentiation
An American Journal of Roentgenology open-access article by radiologists from Wuhan, China concluded that chest CT had a low rate of misdiagnosis of COVID-19 (3.9%, 2/51) and could help standardize imaging features and rules of transformation for rapid diagnosis; however, CT remains limited for the identification of specific viruses and distinguishing between viruses.
Porin-like proteins sneak nutrients through Mycobacterium tuberculosis' waxy defensive walls
Explaining how slow-growing tuberculosis bacteria acquire nutrients across their membranes, without also becoming vulnerable to drugs that target them, researchers report a crucial role in this for a family of porin-like proteins in the bacteria's notoriously tough, waxy coating.
Microbiome species interactions reveal how bacteria collaborate to cheat death
When a doctor prescribes antibiotics, it sets up a multi-faceted experiment in your gastrointestinal system.
Study finds music therapy helps stroke patients
New research has found that music therapy sessions have a positive effect on the neurorehabilitation of acute stroke patients, as well as their mood.
New software tool fosters quality control of genome-scale models of metabolism
The lack of common standards and problems with reproducing and verifying existing datasets are widespread in the biotech community.
Hong Kong study shows best practices protect healthcare workers from COVID-19
Health systems can protect healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak when best practices for infection control are diligently applied along with lessons learned from recent outbreaks.
Same genes, same conditions, different transport
The bacterium Lactococcus lactis is unable to produce the amino acid methionine and has to rely on uptake from the environment, using systems with high or low affinity.
Solving a mystery in 126 dimensions
One of the fundamental mysteries of chemistry has been solved by Australian scientists - and the result may have implications for future designs of solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and other next gen technologies.
Ultra-wide field retinal imaging techniques cannot be used interchangeably
For the evaluation and treatment of diabetic eye disease, research from the Joslin Diabetes Center's Beetham Eye Institute has now shown that one technique, UFW fluorescein angiography, detects over three times more microaneurysms than UWF color imaging.
Genetic study offers comprehensive and diverse view of recent US population history
Researchers have assembled one of the most comprehensive studies of population genetics ever conducted in the United States, bringing together large-scale genetics data from more than 32,000 participants in the National Geographic Genographic Project.
App helps reduce osteoarthritis pain
By performing a few simple physical exercises daily, and receiving information about their disease regularly, 500 osteoarthritis patients were able to on average halve their pain in 6 months -- and improve their physical function.
Drones can now scan terrain and excavations without human intervention
Drones can now scan terrain and excavations without human intervention.
Pesticides increase the risk of schistosomiasis, a tropical disease
Schistosomiasis is a severe infectious disease caused by parasitic worms.
Caffeine boosts problem-solving ability but not creativity, study indicates
Want to boost creativity? Caffeine may not be the way to go according to a news study by U of A psychologist Darya Zabelina.
First real-time observation of the chaos within 3D liquid crystals
A new study offers the opportunity to watch dynamic 3D liquid crystal systems and the chaotic motion within that until now have largely been studied through theory and simulations.
Corn productivity in real time: Satellites, field cameras, and farmers team up
University of Illinois scientists, with help from members of the Illinois Corn Growers Association, have developed a new, scalable method for estimating crop productivity in real time.
Scientists develop free computer program to map blood flow 'landscape' in tumors
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have created a computer program for scientists at no charge that lets users readily quantify the structural and functional changes in the blood flow networks feeding tumors.
Discovery of accurate and far more efficient algorithm for point set registration problems
Point set registration problems, i.e. finding corresponding points between shapes represented as point sets, are important in a variety of fields, so algorithms have been developed.
Study finds that Community Treatment Orders do not reduce hospital readmission rates or stays
CTOs are a legal order for compulsory community monitoring and treatment of people discharged from psychiatric hospitals and were introduced in the Mental Health Act amendment in 2007.
Your back pain may be due to evolution and spine shape
The cause of back pain can be linked to humanity's evolutionary past, according to new research from a team of bioarchaeologists at Simon Fraser University, the University of Liverpool, and the University of Sydney.
Superhydrophobic magnetic sponge to help purify water from oil products
TPU jointly with the University of Lille developed a new material capable of purifying water effectively from oil products.
Did cataract surgery change melatonin secretion in older patients?
The secretion of melatonin is an important indicator of the body's circadian rhythm.
Chemotherapy after surgery halves risk of rare kidney cancer coming back
Chemotherapy halves the risk of a rare form of kidney cancer coming back after surgery, the largest ever trial conducted in the disease worldwide has found.
Microcensus in bacteria
Bacillus subtilis can determine proportions of different groups within a mixed population.
LGBT health improves when friends are just like them
Researchers from Michigan State University are the first to pinpoint social factors that can reduce these stressors and improve health for LGBT people.
New ESO study evaluates impact of satellite constellations on astronomical observations
Astronomers have recently raised concerns about the impact of satellite mega-constellations on scientific research.
Rivers: how they contribute to better understand the Mediterranean Sea dynamics
A new study lead by the CMCC Foundation will provide key information to support and improve the operational ocean forecasts released by Copernicus, develop climate scenarios, and in the future support the design of nature-based solutions to improve environmental resilience and reduce hydro-meteorological risks in Europe.
Veterinarians: Dogs, too, can experience hearing loss
Just like humans, dogs are sometimes born with impaired hearing or experience hearing loss as a result of disease, inflammation, aging or exposure to noise.
Young teachers happier but say hard work is unrewarded
Newly qualified teachers report higher levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction compared to other graduates, but are more likely to say hard work in Britain is unrewarded, according to UCL research.
World's smelliest fruit could charge your mobile phone
Pungent produce packs an electrical punch. New method using world's 'most repulsive smelling fruit' could 'substantially reduce' the cost of energy storage.
Social isolation could cause physical inflammation
Social isolation could be associated with increased inflammation in the body new research from the University of Surrey and Brunel University London has found.
Researchers question reliability of common autistic personality test
Autistic personality questionnaire used by GPs and researchers is 'unreliable' say researchers from universities of Bath and Cardiff.
Terahertz radiation technique opens a new door for studying atomic behavior
Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made a promising new advance for the lab's high-speed 'electron camera' that could allow them to 'film' tiny, ultrafast motions of protons and electrons in chemical reactions that have never been seen before.
AI reveals differences in appearance of cancer tissue between racial populations
Scientists at Case Western Reserve University are using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to reveal apparent cellular distinctions between black and white cancer patients, while also exploring potential racial bias in the rapidly developing field of AI.
ALMA spots metamorphosing aged star
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has captured the very moment when an old star first starts to alter its environment.
Researchers discover a new diet-associated gut-microbe metabolite linked to cardiovascular disease
Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a gut microbe-generated byproduct -- phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) -- that is linked to development of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, stroke and death.
Connecting interferon, neuroinflammation and synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease
Interferon-mediated inflammation in brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease triggers synapse loss key to neurodegeneration.
Half billion-year-old 'social network' observed in early animals
Some of the first animals on Earth were connected by networks of thread-like filaments, the earliest evidence yet found of life being connected in this way.
New approach to sustainable building takes shape in Boston
A new building about to take shape in Boston's Roxbury area could, its designers hope, herald a new way of building residential structures in cities.
New genetic signatures in childhood leukemia create paths for precision medicine
Researchers with Nemours Children's Health System utilized Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to more precisely identify genomic characteristics of leukemias in children, the most common childhood cancer.
For older adults, more physical activity could mean longer, healthier lives
Older adults were 67% less likely to die of any cause if they were moderately or vigorously physically active for at least 150 minutes per week, compared to people who exercised less.
Layered solar cell technology boosts efficiency, affordability
Researchers from CU Boulder have created a low-cost solar cell with one of the highest power-conversion efficiencies to date, by layering cells and using a unique combination of elements.
Preventing spread of SARS coronavirus-2 in humans
Viruses must enter cells of the human body to cause disease.
Enhanced care coordination can benefit patients with multiple chronic illnesses
The CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program aims to improve health care services, particularly for patients with multiple chronic conditions.
Illness won't stop vampire bat moms from caring for their offspring
A study of social interactions among vampire bats that felt sick suggests family comes first when illness strikes - and may help explain which social interactions are most likely to contribute to disease transmission.
New sleep method strengthens brain's ability to retain memories
A new joint study by Tel Aviv University and Weizmann Institute of Science researchers has yielded an innovative method for bolstering memory processes in the brain during sleep.
Water splitting observed on the nanometer scale
Hydrogen is being traded as the energy carrier of the future.
Neural hardware for image recognition in nanoseconds
Usually, artificial intelligence is based on software. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) created intelligent hardware, which is much faster.
'Tickling' an atom to investigate the behavior of materials
Scientists and engineers working at the frontier of nanotechnology face huge challenges.
Native Americans and higher cigarette use: Stereotype goes up in smoke
University of Arizona Health Sciences study finds when whites and Native Americans in comparable income and education levels are compared, whites consume more cigarettes and are more nicotine dependent.
Curcumin is the spice of life when delivered via tiny nanoparticles
For years, curry lovers have sworn by the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric, but its active compound, curcumin, has long frustrated scientists hoping to validate these claims with clinical studies.
Study: Tuberculosis bacteria trigger cough, facilitating spread
The bacteria that cause the deadly lung disease tuberculosis appear to facilitate their own spread by producing a molecule that triggers cough.
Cooling magnets with sound
Today, most quantum experiments are carried out with the help of light, including those in nanomechanics, where tiny objects are cooled with electromagnetic waves to such an extent that they reveal quantum properties.
Atomic force microscopy: New sensing element for high-speed imaging
With atomic force microscopy, tiny structures can be imaged. But usually there is a trade of: In order to create pictures quickly, very stiff materials have to be used in the microscope, but they can damage delicate structures such as living cells.
X-ray eyes peer deeper into deadly pathogen
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery and their international colleagues examine a key membrane protein responsible for the tularemia bacterium's prodigious ability to infect the body and cause illness.
Air pollution is one of the world's most dangerous health risks
Researchers calculate that the effects of air pollution shorten the lives of people around the world by an average of almost three years.
Many lyme disease cases go unreported; A new model could help change that
A new model based on 17 years of data can help predict the trajectory of where Lyme disease will spread.
App, AI work together to provide rapid at-home assessment of coronavirus risk
A coronavirus app coupled with machine intelligence will soon enable an individual to get an at-home risk assessment based on how they feel and where they've been in about a minute, and direct those deemed at risk to the nearest definitive testing facility, investigators say.
UConn researchers discover new stem cells that can generate new bone
A population of stem cells with the ability to generate new bone has been newly discovered by a group of researchers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine.
Tissue-digging nanodrills do just enough damage
Scientists show light-activated molecular drills effectively kill cells in whole eukaryotic organisms.
York University researchers one step closer to creating organic batteries
York University researchers have discovered a way to make Lithium-powered batteries more environmentally friendly while retaining performance, stability and storage capacity.
Freeze-dried soil is more suitable for studying soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions
Air-dried or oven-dried soils are commonly used in the laboratory to study soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions.
Unexpected ways animals influence fires
Animals eating plants might seem like an obvious way to suppress fire, and humans are already using the enormous appetites of goats, deer, and cows to reduce the fuel available for potential wildfires.
Scientists say it is time to save the red sea's coral reef
An international group of researchers led by Karine Kleinhaus, MD, of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), calls upon UNESCO to declare the Red Sea's 4000 km of coral reef as a Marine World Heritage Site and recommends additional measures critical for the reef's survival. the study is published in Frontiers in Marine Sciences.
What we don't know (about lakes) could hurt us
As the power of extreme weather events increase with climate change, a team of scientists warn that lakes around the world may dramatically change, threatening ecosystem health and water quality.
Chlamydia build their own entrance into human cells
Chlamydia, a type of pathogenic bacteria, need to penetrate human cells in order to multiply.
Neurofibromatosis gene provides new insight into breast cancer resistance to hormone therapy
Neurofibromin (NF1), a protein involved in cancer growth, helps estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer develop resistance to hormone therapy by two independent mechanisms, not one as previously thought.
'Magnonic nanoantennas': optically-inspired computing with spin waves one step closer
A new methodology for generating and manipulating spin waves in nanostructured magnetic materials opens the way to developing nano-processors for extraordinarily quick and energy efficient analog processing of information.
New next-generation sequencing technique dramatically shortens diagnosis of sepsis
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new technique that uses real-time next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze tiny amounts of microbial cell-free DNA in the plasma of patients with sepsis, offering the possibility of accurate diagnosis of sepsis-causing agents within a few hours of drawing blood.
Public health leaders call for coordinated communication response to COVID-19
On Thursday in the National Academy of Medicine's Perspectives, public health leaders including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Distinguished Lecturer Scott Ratzan, MD called for informed and active public policy leadership to employ strategically coordinated health communication and outreach on COVID-19 and other emerging global health threats.
From disseminating ideology to financing: How extremist networks operate
Key players in radical Islamic and extreme right-wing groups make use of similar strategies to mobilize support on social media.
Downsizing the McMansion: Study gauges a sustainable size for future homes
A new scholarly paper authored at NJIT assesses a big factor in the needed transformation of our living spaces toward sustainability-- the size of our homes.
Bacteria killed by new light-activated coating
A new coating that activates in low intensity light to kill bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli has been developed by a UCL-led team of researchers.
Humans transport dangerous smoke residues indoors
A team of scientists discovered that people carry hazardous compounds from cigarette smoke into non-smoking environments.
One step closer to understanding the human brain
An international team of scientists led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has launched a comprehensive overview of all proteins expressed in the brain, published today in the journal Science.
Triglycerides control neurons in the reward circuit
Energy-dense food, obesity and compulsive food intake bordering addiction: the scientific literature has been pointing to connections between these for years.
When older people feel excluded at work
Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons.
More accurate climate change model reveals bleaker outlook on electricity, water use
A model developed by Purdue University researchers more accurately captures how climate change will impact electricity and water use.
Skoltech scientists break Google's quantum algorithm
In the near term, Google has devised new quantum enhanced algorithms that operate in the presence of realistic noise.
Intestinal microbes reprogram genetic activity of gut mucosa
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem demonstrated in mice that intestinal bacteria reprogram DNA activity in cells of the gut mucosa and thus have a considerable impact on the development of the healthy gut.
Understanding how the brain predicts could make treating autism easier
Our brains make our lives easier by predicting what will happen next based on previous experiences.
Engineered bone marrow cells slow growth of prostate and pancreatic cancer cells
In experiments with mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have slowed the growth of transplanted human prostate and pancreatic cancer cells by introducing bone marrow cells with a specific gene deletion to induce a novel immune response.
Animal behavior: Anxieties and problematic behaviors may be common in pet dogs
Anxieties and behavior problems may be common across dog breeds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
Exciting tweaks for organic solar cells
A molecular tweak has improved organic solar cell performance, bringing us closer to cheaper, efficient, and more easily manufactured photovoltaics.
The harmful effects of stress during pregnancy can last a lifetime
Mice exposed to stress in the womb and soon after birth can expect a lifetime of immune system deficiencies that hinder the ability to ward off infections and cancer, Yale University researchers report March 5, 2020 in the journal Cell.
The arrival of the laptop in the classroom and parental mediation
A study by Carme Bach, a lecturer with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences at UPF, and Cristina Aliagas, a lecturer with the Faculty of Education at the UAB, both members of the GR@EL research group.
Cool beans: A vertical crop fit for Africa's changing climate and nutritional gaps
A new study maps where climbing beans are suitable in parts of Africa for future scenarios of food security as climate change threatens traditional bean production.
GI symptoms and potential fecal transmission in coronavirus patients
In two new papers published online in Gastroenterology, investigators from China describe the impact of coronavirus on the digestive tract.
Neither nature nor nurture: Behavioral individuality in fruit flies' neurodevelopmental origin
While some fruit flies wander, others prefer to walk the straight and narrow; the origin of these behavioral quirks in individual flies may be a product of random variation in how neural circuits are wired during brain development, a new study of fruit flies given 'lines to walk' finds.
Study: Organic molecules discovered by Curiosity Rover consistent with early life on Mars
Organic compounds called thiophenes are found on Earth in coal, crude oil and oddly enough, in white truffles, the mushroom beloved by epicureans and wild pigs.
FSU researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle
As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle.
Scientists develop new method to distinguish freshly made transcripts from old transcripts
Researchers from the group of Alexander van Oudenaarden at the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) developed a new method to assess how production and degradation of gene transcripts are regulated.
Colorectal cancer burden shifting to younger individuals
The burden of colorectal cancer is swiftly shifting to younger individuals as incidence increases in young adults and declines in older age groups, according to the latest edition of Colorectal Cancer Statistics 2020, a publication of the American Cancer Society.
Researchers discover a previously unappreciated neurotransmitter system in the brain
Within this system, the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain occurs via the trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5).

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