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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 09, 2020


Scientists identify new target for Parkinson's therapies
A master control region of a protein linked to Parkinson's disease has been identified for the first time.
Experts discover toolkit to repair DNA breaks linked to aging, cancer and MND
A new 'toolkit' to repair damaged DNA that can lead to aging, cancer and motor neurone disease (MND) has been discovered by scientists at the universities of Sheffield and Oxford.
Better lifestyle habits are useful additions to optimize management of atrial fibrillation
Improving lifestyle habits -- such as attaining and maintaining a healthy body weight and getting regular, moderate physical activity -- may be useful additions to physician-guided management of atrial fibrillation (AF), a serious heart rhythm abnormality that can lead to stroke.
Microscopic STAR particles offer new potential treatment for skin diseases
A skin cream infused with microscopic particles, named STAR particles, could potentially facilitate better treatment of skin diseases including psoriasis, warts, and certain types of skin cancer.
Ultrathin organic solar cell is both efficient and durable
Scientists have succeeded in creating an ultrathin organic solar cell that is both highly efficient and durable.
Hospices struggle to deliver specialized support to children when a parent is dying
Support available to children experiencing the death of a parent varies across the country, new research published in the BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care finds.
Cell biology -- maintaining mitochondrial resilience
Mitochondria cannot autonomously cope with stress and must instead call on the cell for help.
Providing contraceptive care in the pediatric emergency department
A new study found that two-thirds of female adolescents ages 16-21 seen in a pediatric Emergency Department (ED) were interested in discussing contraception, despite having a high rate of recent visits to a primary care provider.
Cryo-EM reveals unexpected diversity of photosystems
Annemarie Perez Boerema from Alexey Amunts lab reconstructed the atomic models of new forms of Photosystem I in collaboration with scientists from Israel and China.
Focusing continuity of care on sicker patients can save millions of dollars annually
Research shows higher continuity of care, meaning a care team cooperatively involved in ongoing healthcare, is better for health outcomes, but can there be too much of a good thing?
New type of pulsating star discovered
Two research teams searching NASA's TESS Explorer data found an unusual star.
Spending on experiences versus possessions advances more immediate happiness
Consumers are happier when they spend their money on experiential purchases versus material ones, according to research from the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin.
Drug-delivery technology leads to sustained HIV antibody production in NIH study
A new approach to direct the body to make a specific antibody against HIV led to sustained production of that antibody for more than a year among participants in an NIH clinical trial.
Firearm violence solutions from a public health perspective
While firearm violence is a major public health challenge in the United States, it has often been considered a law enforcement issue with only law enforcement solutions.
Wearing clothes could release more microfibres to the environment than washing them
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists from the Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials of the National Research Council of Italy (IPCB-CNR) and the University of Plymouth compared four different items of polyester clothing and how many fibres were released when they were being worn and washed.
Is your coffee contributing to malaria risk?
Researchers at the University of Sydney and University of São Paulo, Brazil, estimate 20% of the malaria risk in deforestation hot spots is driven by the international trade of exports including: coffee, timber, soybean, cocoa, wood products, palm oil, tobacco, beef and cotton.
Sea turtles have a deadly attraction to stinky plastic
Sea turtles around the world are threatened by marine plastic debris, mostly through ingestion and entanglement.
The ink of the future in printed electronics
A research group led by Simone Fabiano at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, has created an organic material with superb conductivity that doesn't need to be doped.
NUS study reveals positive connection between nature experiences and happiness globally
An AI analysis of photographs posted on social media revealed a positive association between nature and happiness globally.
More taxpayers' money for the environment and public benefit
Over 3,600 scientists from across Europe call for effective action from the EU regarding its Common Agricultural Policy.
BU researchers: The health care system is failing transgender cancer survivors
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first-ever population-based study of cancer prevalence in transgender people, estimating 62,530 of the nearly 17 million cancer survivors in the US are transgender.
Indian Ocean phenomenon spells climate trouble for Australia
New international research has found a worrying change in the Indian Ocean's surface temperatures that puts southeast Australia on course for increasingly hot and dry conditions.
Lack of information impedes access to food pantries and programs in Utah
Utah residents who have difficulty keeping their families fed could be missing a key ingredient: information.
Protecting DNA origami for anti-cancer drug delivery
Scientists coated octahedral-shaped DNA origami with peptoids that help protect the nanostructures in physiological environments relevant to biomedical applications including anti-cancer drug delivery.
Astronomers pinpoint rare binary brown dwarf
Astronomers working on 'first light' results from a newly commissioned telescope in Chile made a chance discovery that led to the identification of a rare eclipsing binary brown dwarf system.
Groovy key to nanotubes in 2D
New research offers a groovy answer to the question of what causes carbon nanotubes to align in ultrathin crystalline films discovered at Rice.
Gene therapy reverses heart failure in mouse model of Barth syndrome
Barth syndrome is a rare genetic disease in boys that can cause life-threatening heart failure and also weakens the skeletal muscles and the immune system.
Examining diagnoses of stress-related disorders, risk of neurodegenerative diseases
Researchers investigated how stress-related disorders (such as posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder and stress reactions) were associated with risk for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), using data from national health registers in Sweden.
Homeless Health Research Network releases evidence-based clinical guideline
A collaborative approach is required to build healthcare pathways that will end homelessness in Canada, says the Homeless Health Research Network, a pan-Canadian team of experts including researchers from McGill University.
Study suggests no evidence of association between rotavirus vaccination, type 1 diabetes in kids
Findings in this observational study of almost 387,000 children born in the US don't show evidence of an association between rotavirus vaccination (routinely recommended for all infants by age 8 months) and type 1 diabetes in children who were followed over a range of about 5 years.
Turbulent convection at the heart of stellar activity
Different stars can exhibit different levels of activity. The Sun's signs of solar activity are rather feeble on an astronomical scale.
University of Surrey's 'SMART' study awarded £426k to make multilingual content accessible
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), part of UK Research and Innovation, has awarded £426,000 to the University of Surrey to undertake a ground-breaking investigation into interlingual live subtitling via respeaking.
Squatting or kneeling may have health benefits
A team of researchers from USC, UCLA, Duke and from Tanzania found by tracking the movements and health of the Hadza, a hunter-gatherer community, that they lack the markers for heart disease and metabolic disease that are common in people in industrialized societies.
How a virus forms its symmetric shells
Viruses have been well studied, but many mysteries linger. One such mystery is how a spherical virus circumvents energy barriers to form symmetric shells.
Natural contaminant threat to drinking water from groundwater
Climate change and urbanisation are set to threaten groundwater drinking water quality, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.
Violence faced by sexual minority adolescents
The risk of physical and sexual violence faced by gay, lesbian, bisexual and questioning US high schoolers was quantified in this observational study that used pooled data from a survey conducted every two years by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Two weeks after sports-related concussion, most patients have not recovered
Less than half of patients with sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) achieve clinical recovery within two weeks after injury, reports a study in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.
Driver's-ed-inspired system could make automated parallel parking more accessible
One of the most challenging tasks for drivers is parallel parking, which is why automatic parking systems are becoming a popular feature on some vehicles.
'Deceptively simple' process could boost plastics recycling
Plastics are a victim of their own success, so inexpensive, easy to use and versatile that the world is awash in plastic waste.
Differences between self-identified general practitioners and board-certified family doctors
Physicians who identify as 'general practitioners' are a group distinct from board-certified 'family physicians,' according to a new study that was supported, in part, by the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation.
New study presents stretchable and colorless solar cells, using Si microwire composites
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a flexible and transparent solar cell, using silicon microwire composites.
Water splitting advance holds promise for affordable renewable energy
A team led by Los Alamos National Lab and WSU researchers has developed a less expensive water electrolysis system that works under alkaline conditions but still produces hydrogen at comparable rates to the currently used system that works under acidic conditions and requires precious metals.
Discovery points to origin of mysterious ultraviolet radiation
Lyman-alpha blobs (LABs) are gigantic clouds of hydrogen gas that produce a special type of ultraviolet light known as Lyman-alpha emission.
Circulatory failure is predictable
Researchers at ETH Zurich and Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, have developed a method for predicting circulatory failure in patients in inten-sive care units -- enabling clinicians to intervene at an early stage.
Uncovering novel relationships between SLCs and cytotoxic drugs in human cells
CeMM Researchers have studied how Solute Carriers (SLCs), a large family of membrane transport proteins, influence the activity and potency of cytotoxic drugs.
New branded PrEP not worth the high cost compared with generic formulation
A newly approved drug for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) may undermine efforts to expand access to HIV prevention for the nation's most vulnerable populations, experts say.
Machine learning could improve the diagnosis of mastitis infections in cows
Artificial intelligence could help vets to more accurately diagnose the origin of mastitis on dairy herds, according to a new study from experts at the University of Nottingham.
A broad look at plant-environment interactions
Three plant science journals---the American Journal of Botany (AJB), Applications in Plant Sciences (APPS), and the International Journal of Plant Sciences (IJPS)---have joined efforts to provide a broad look at how plants interact with their environment.
New findings of chemical differences between PM1 and PM2.5 might reshape air pollution studies
A new study by the Institute of Atmospheric Physics at Chinese Academy of Sciences reveals chemical differences between PM1 and PM2.5 and how these differences may affect pollultion studies.
Viewership soars for misleading tobacco videos on YouTube
Misleading portrayals of the safety of tobacco use are widespread on YouTube, where the viewership of popular pro-tobacco videos has soared over the past half-dozen years, according to research by the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.
NIH study finds lower concentration of PrEP drug in pregnant young women
Among African adolescent girls and young women who took HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) daily, levels of the PrEP drug tenofovir were more than 30% lower in those who were pregnant than in those who had recently given birth.
Babies born prematurely can catch up their immune systems, study finds
Researchers from King's College London & Homerton University Hospital have found babies born before 32 weeks' gestation can rapidly acquire some adult immune functions after birth, equivalent to that achieved by infants born at term.
Scientists propose a flexible interface design for silicon-graphite dual-ion battery
A research group led by Prof. TANG Yongbing and his team members (Dr.
Scientists propose new method for large-scale production of thermally stable single-atom catalysts
A research group led by Prof. QIAO Botao from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed a new method for large-scale production of thermally stable single-atom catalysts (SACs) with high metal loading.
Cute monkeys perceived as safer, but in reality dominant animals get closer to humans
People say they are more willing to approach cute-looking monkeys in the wild, but in reality end up getting closer to dominant monkeys they believe could pose more risk, according to new research.
International study completes the largest genetic map of psychiatric disorders so far
An international study published in the journal Cell, has described 109 genetic variants associated with eight psychiatric disorders: autism, ADHD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette Syndrome, in a total of about 230,000 patients worldwide.
Powering the future with revolutionary lithium extraction technique
An international research team, led by Australia's Monash University, has pioneered and patented a new filtration technique that could one day slash lithium extraction times and change the way the future is powered.
Sensory information underpins abstract knowledge
What we learn through our senses drives how knowledge is sorted in our brains, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.
Tax incentives for businesses could contribute to the decline of the middle class
Economic development incentives may do more harm than good, especially for middle-class workers, according to new West Virginia University research.
Climate change at Mount Rainier to increase 'mismatch' between visitors, wildflowers
The wildflowers of Mount Rainier's subalpine meadows, which bloom once the winter snowpack melts, are a major draw for the more than 1 million visitors to this national park in Washington state each spring and summer.
Our brains are powerful -- but secretive -- forecasters of video virality
Our brains can predict the popularity of online videos, without us even knowing it.
Residencies must train residents to treat substance use disorder among pregnant women
Early-career family physicians who both provide maternity care and prescribe buprenorphine -- a medication used to treat opioid use disorder -- primarily completed their training in a small number of residency programs.
Photosynthesis varies greatly across rice cultivars--natural diversity could boost yields
A team from the University of Illinois and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) examined how 14 diverse varieties photosynthesize--the process by which all crops convert sunlight energy into sugars that ultimately become our food.
Fresh groundwater flow important for coastal ecosystems
Groundwater is the largest source of freshwater, one of the world's most precious natural resources and vital for crops and drinking water.
Climate variations may impact the base of the food web along the California coast
A recent study conducted by researchers at Cal Poly revealed that in addition to seasonal changes in oceanographic conditions, natural climate cycles greatly influenced the base of the food web at the Cal Poly Pier in Central California.
Adding smoking cessation to lung cancer screening can reduce mortality by 14%
Including smoking cessation with existing lung cancer screening efforts would reduce lung cancer mortality by 14% and increase life-years gained by 81% compared with screening alone, according to a study from Rafael Meza from the University of Michigan and colleagues and published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, a publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.
New study unveils the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled the structure and mechanism of proteins that are highly overexpressed in various cancers and associated with poor patient prognoses.
'Strange' glimpse into neutron stars and symmetry violation
New results from precision particle detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) offer a fresh glimpse of the particle interactions that take place in the cores of neutron stars and give nuclear physicists a new way to search for violations of fundamental symmetries in the universe.
How new data can make ecological forecasts as good as weather forecasts
Soon, University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Ben Zuckerberg thinks we'll be able to pull off the same forecasting feat for bird migrations and wildlife populations as for climate forecasts.
Show me the methane
Though not as prevalent in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, methane is a far more potent greenhouse gas.
Glucose acts as a double edged sword on longevity factor SIRT1
Aberrant fasted-to-refed transitions associated with excess glucose production and perturbed insulin signaling in the liver, are known to cause diabetes/obesity/aging.
First-ever analysis of video recorded CPR improves resuscitation outcomes in emergency departments
Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and North Shore University Hospital pioneer video recording and review process to improve live-saving CPR process.
Strong signals show how proteins come and go
Rice University bioscientists develop a versatile gene signal amplifier that can not only do a better job of detecting the expression of chromosomal genes than current methods but can potentially be used to detect any cellular gene.
A flexible brain for AI
Scientists at Osaka University developed a customizable computing device using nanofabricated switches than can be rewired to optimize AI applications using 80% less power.
Princeton researchers identify factors essential for chronic hepatitis B infection
A study published in the journal Nature Microbiology identified factors that the hepatitis B virus uses when establishing long-term infection in the liver.
Predicting appropriate opioid prescriptions post-cesarean delivery
Knowing the amount of opioids taken following cesarean section surgery and before discharge can inform individualized prescriptions and cut down on unnecessary, leftover pills that could be used for non-medical purposes, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Learning empathy as a care giver takes more than experience
Research among nursing students shows that past experience living in poverty or volunteering in impoverished communities, does not sufficiently build empathy towards patients who experience poverty.
Clotting problem
New research into why some people's blood doesn't clot well identified defects in the platelet-making process, where mutant cells aren't behaving properly.
Stone-age 'likes': Study establishes eggshell beads exchanged over 30,000 years
A clump of grass grows on an outcrop of shale 33,000 years ago.
Researchers map protein motion
Cornell structural biologists took a new approach to using a classic method of X-ray analysis to capture something the conventional method had never accounted for: the collective motion of proteins.
Food prices after a hard Brexit could increase by £50 per week
A hard Brexit could result in a family of four seeing their food prices increase to up to £50.98 per week researchers at the University of Warwick have found.
New high-cost HIV prevention drug: 'Better' isn't worth it
A newly approved drug for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is unlikely to confer any discernible health benefit over generic alternatives and may undermine efforts to expand access to HIV prevention for the nation's most vulnerable populations, according to a new study appearing March 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
Study finds athletes who play indoor sports at risk of vitamin D deficiency
George Mason University and Mayo Clinic Health System study assesses vitamin D status and supplementation of college athletes.
Research on soldier ants reveals that evolution can go in reverse
Turtle ant soldiers and their oddly-shaped heads suggest that evolution is not always a one-way street toward increasing specialization.
Commentary on an approach to Indigenous homelessness
Indigenous historian and York University professor Jesse Thistle and Dr.
Mayo Clinic-led study links obesity with pancreatitis
A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona published in the The Journal of Clinical Investigation has found that obesity is not only implicated in chronic diseases such as diabetes, but also in sudden-onset diseases such as pancreatitis.
New guideline provides pathway to end homelessness, with housing as the foundation
A collaborative approach is required to build health care pathways that will end homelessness in Canada.
Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago
Earth turned faster at the end of the time of the dinosaurs than it does today, rotating 372 times a year, compared to the current 365, according to a new study of fossil mollusk shells from the late Cretaceous in AGU's journal Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology.
Collaborating with a team of rivals can resolve conflict -- and advance science
Five social scientists holed up in an Amsterdam hotel for a week with the goal of reaching a scientific consensus on how people form stereotypes.
Looking outside the fiber: Researchers demonstrate new concept of optical fiber sensors
Researchers have demonstrated a new concept of optical fiber sensors that addresses a decades-long challenge: the distributed mapping of refractive index outside the cladding of standard fiber, where light does not reach.
Ship noise hampers crab camouflage
Colour-changing crabs struggle to camouflage themselves when exposed to noise from ships, new research shows.
Study uncovers bias and stereotyping when recruiting patients for clinical trials
New research published in CANCER reveals bias and stereotyping among clinical and research professionals who recruit patients to enroll in cancer clinical trials.
Why organisms shrink
Everyone is talking about global warming. A team of paleontologists at GeoZentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has recently investigated how prehistoric organisms reacted to climate change, basing their research on belemnites.
Male size advantage drives evolution of sex change in reef fish
Some species of fish, notably parrotfish and wrasses living on coral reefs, change their biological sex as they age, beginning life as females and later becoming functionally male.
Research uncovers a new way of making chiral catalysts
Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a new way to create one hand of a chiral molecule by using a mechanical bond as a catalyst.
Rain, more than wind, led to massive toppling of trees in Hurricane Maria, says study
A new study says that hurricanes Irma and Maria combined in 2017 to knock down a quarter of the biomass contained in Puerto Rico's trees -- and that massive rainfall, more than wind, was a previously unsuspected key factor.
Why do sea turtles eat ocean plastics? New research points to smell
The findings are the first demonstration that the smell of ocean plastics causes animals to eat them.
Report provides road map to improve response to legionnaires' disease outbreaks and conserve water
A new policy report, Electronic Registration Systems for Cooling Towers - Improving Public Health and Sustainability Outcomes, published by the Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN) proposes a standardized yet flexible template for cooling tower registries that are designed to improve health outcomes, address disparity in affected populations, and increase water and energy efficiency.
Bulb size matters: Uncovering the evolution of the plant kingdom's doomsday preppers
Bulbs are doomsday preppers, storing up resources underground to ride out disaster.
Improving the collection of birth and death data worldwide
University of Melbourne researchers have identified and implemented the key interventions and tools that countries can -- and should -- use to improve the quality and availability of critical birth and death data and ultimately, improve health outcomes.
Hot time in the city: Urban lizards evolve heat tolerance
Faced with a gritty landscape of metal fences, concrete walls and asphalt pavement, city lizards in Puerto Rico rapidly and repeatedly evolved better tolerance for heat than their forest counterparts, according to new research from Washington University in St.
Copy/paste and delete -- or how to thrive without gene regulation
Turning genes on and off as needed allows an organism to adapt to changes in the environment -- provided the organism has a specific regulatory design in place.
Research reveals collective dynamics of active matter systems
A study provides new details about the collective motion of individual agents in a liquid-crystal-like system, which could help in better understanding bacterial colonies, structures and systems in the human body, and other forms of active matter.
Sticky tape: A key ingredient for mapping artifact origins
Researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Japan have demonstrated that combining a highly sensitive sulfur analysis technique with simple sulfur-free tape is an effective and harmless way to test extremely small samples of vermilion from artifacts that are thousands of years old.
Is federal rental assistance associated with childhood asthma outcomes?
National survey data and housing assistance records were used to examine whether participation in US Department of Housing and Urban Development rental assistance programs was associated with childhood asthma outcomes, including ever being diagnosed with asthma, history of asthma attack, and treatment in the emergency department for asthma.
New study on COVID-19 estimates 5.1 days for incubation period
An analysis of publicly available data on infections from the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, that causes the respiratory illness COVID-19 yielded an estimate of 5.1 days for the median disease incubation period, according to a new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
The Lancet: First study identifies risk factors associated with death in adults hospitalised with new coronavirus disease in Wuhan
Being of an older age, showing signs of sepsis, and having blood clotting issues when admitted to hospital are key risk factors associated with higher risk of death from the new coronavirus (COVID-19), according to a new observational study of 191 patients with confirmed COVID-19 from two hospitals in Wuhan, China, published in The Lancet.
Mathematical model could lead to better treatment for diabetes
MIT researchers have developed a mathematical model that can predict the behavior of glucose-responsive insulin in humans and in rodents.
Scientists create tool to detect genes associated with psychiatric, brain diseases
Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and colleagues created a new computational tool called H-MAGMA to study the genetic underpinnings of nine brain disorders, including the identification of new genes associated with each disorder.
'Primitive' stem cells shown to regenerate blood vessels in the eye
Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have successfully turned back the biological hands of time, coaxing adult human cells in the laboratory to revert to a primitive state, and unlocking their potential to replace and repair damage to blood vessels in the retina caused by diabetes.
St. Jude finds cancer drug resistance genes and possibly how to limit their effects
Drug resistance is a leading cause of cancer death in children and adults with leukemia.
Prostate cancer 'fingerprint' detected in blood sample
Scientists at UCL have invented a new test to identify the earliest genetic changes of prostate cancer in blood: a process which could allow doctors to see if cancers have spread, monitor tumor behavior and enable better treatment selection.
Nationwide study shows disparities in outpatient care for common orthopaedic problems
Racial/ethnic minorities, people with lower incomes, and other groups are less likely to receive office-based care for common musculoskeletal conditions, reports a nationwide study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®.
Atomic fingerprint identifies emission sources of uranium
Depending on whether uranium is released by the civil nuclear industry or as fallout from nuclear weapon tests, the ratio of the two anthropogenic, i.e. man-made, uranium isotopes 233U and 236U varies.
From climate change awareness to action
Awareness of climate change and its impacts is not enough to move people to action.
Advanced optical imaging technique may lead to structure-guided drug design
A Clemson University biophysics faculty member and a team of international researchers have developed and demonstrated a new optical imaging method to monitor a single molecule in action.
Paid maternity leave has mental and physical health benefits for mothers and children
Paid maternity leave has major mental and physical health benefits for mothers and children - including reduced rates of postpartum depression and infant mortality, according to a report in the March/April issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry.
Urine test could reduce unnecessary prostate cancer biopsies
Unnecessary prostate cancer biopsies could be reduced by 60% thanks to new research from the University of East Anglia.
Smart scaffolding to monitor tumor growth in real time and controlled environments
Building three-dimensional scaffolding to guide the growth of tumors in controlled environments, to monitor the evolution of each of their cells in real time and to record the release of tumor metabolites and other indicators of cell activity under different conditions.
Ship noise leaves crabs too stressed to hide from danger
The ocean is getting too loud even for crabs. Normally, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) can slowly change their shell color to blend in with the rocky shore, but recent findings show that prolonged exposure to the sounds of ships weakens their camouflaging powers and leaves them more open to attack.
Levels of sBTLA proteins as potential marker of overall survival of liver cancer patients
Researchers at Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine introduced sorafenib to patients with advanced stages of the liver cancer hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and measured the amount of 16 circulating soluble immune checkpoint proteins.
A new method to improve tropical cyclone intensity forecasts
There are many reasons for model errors in numerical weather forecasting of tropical cyclone intensity.
Bacteria potentially involved in the development of type 2 diabetes
Bacteria may be involved in the development of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published today in Nature Metabolism by researchers from Université Laval, the Québec Heart and Lung Institute (IUCPQ), and McMaster University.
Effects of the proposed SNAP eligibility changes
Proposed changes to the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) may result in as many as one in ten U.S. families losing SNAP benefits, and potential impacts are unknown.
Gratitude interventions don't help with depression, anxiety
Go ahead and be grateful for the good things in your life.
Simple method to prevent HIV in South Africa and Uganda works
A large research study in South Africa and Uganda using mobile vans to dispense antiretroviral treatment was very effective.
Safety zone saves giant moons from fatal plunge
Numerical simulations showed that the temperature gradient in the disk of gas around a young gas giant planet could play a critical role in the development of a satellite system dominated by a single large moon, similar to Titan around Saturn.
Clinical trial investigates gabapentin for alcohol use disorder
This randomized clinical trial investigated if gabapentin, a drug often used to treat nerve pain, would be useful in the treatment of patients with alcohol use disorder (problem drinking that becomes severe) and a history of alcohol withdrawal symptoms.
UMD researcher establishes a new viable CRISPR-Cas12b system for plant genome engineering
In a new publication in Nature Plants, assistant professor of Plant Science at the University of Maryland Yiping Qi has established a new CRISPR genome engineering system as viable in plants for the first time: CRISPR-Cas12b.
What is best time to deliver twins?
Researchers in this observational study of 43,000 twins born in Scotland used linked maternal and educational data to identify the optimal gestation week for the birth of infant twins associated with the lowest risk of short- and long-term adverse outcomes, specifically perinatal death and special education needs later on in school.

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