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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 11, 2020


Actively engaging local people could make grizzly conservation policies more bearable
Western Canada hosts a significant portion of North America's grizzly bears, and declining bear numbers have led to various conservation efforts.
How dangerous news spreads: What makes Twitter users retweet risk-related information
In Japan, a country prone to various natural and man-made calamities, users often turn to social media to spread information about risks and warnings.
More genes associated with canine hip dys­plasia and os­teoarth­ritis discovered
A study encompassing over 700 German Shepherd dogs in Finland indicates that increased joint surface attrition is not the sole cause underlying the development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia.
The Lancet: Triple therapies to treat malaria are effective and safe
The first clinical trial of two triple artemisinin-based combination therapies for malaria finds that the combinations are highly efficacious with no safety concerns.
Healthy lifestyle reduces risk of disease, death
The longer you lead a healthy lifestyle during midlife, the less likely you are to develop certain diseases in later life.
Intensive management of crops and livestock spurred La Bastida's economic development
A study reconstructs the entire trophic chain of a Western Mediterranean prehistoric site with samples from La Bastida (Iberian Peninsula), one of Europe's oldest cities.
Aging and nutrients competition determine changes in microbiota
Two studies with surprising discoveries: in the elderly, the bacterium E. coli evolves in a way that can become potentially pathogenic and increase the risk of disease and, according to data obtained in another study, the metabolism of the same bacterium present in the microbiota evolves differently if it is alone or accompanied by other bacteria.
Probing the genes that organize early brain development
A new study finds how a specific gene can impact neurodevelopment and lead to macrocephaly and autism spectrum disorder in animal and lab models.
A novel technique to produce cheaper and more efficient chlorine (Cl?)
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel catalyst (Pt1/CNT) for electrochemical chlorine generation.
Submersible sensors rapidly detect bacterial pollution in water
Environmental engineers from San Diego State University tested sensors that can very quickly detect bacteria in the water, with the potential to relay data immediately to decision makers.
Causes of loneliness differ between generations, research says
People of different generations are equally lonely but for different reasons, a study suggests.
How does flow effect forces of charged surfaces/particles and surfactants in liquids?
Flowing liquids are a major part of industry and occurs inside our very own bodies.
Knowledge of basic finances empowers elderly population in Japan
People with an understanding of basic finances are likely to be aware of existing legal and social services for people with dementia, according to a study of Japan's aging population.
BIN1 deficit impairs brain cell communication, memory consolidation
A new study has discovered that a lack of neuronal protein BIN1 leads to a defect in the transmission of chemical messages that activate brain cell communication allowing us to think, remember and behave.
New flood damage framework helps planners prepare for sea-level rise
Princeton researchers have developed a new framework allowing urban planners and policymakers to consider a combination of responses to sea-level rise and, if hard structures, how high these protections should be built, depending on their tolerance for risk and the projected financial losses to a particular area due to flooding.
World's first minimally invasive tricuspid valve replacement performed in Toronto
The world's first minimally invasive tricuspid valve replacement was performed at St.
Remote South American kelp forests surveyed for first time since 1973
In the kelp forests of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost tip of South America, the relative abundance of kelp, sea urchins, and sea stars has not changed significantly since 1973.
Physician psychotherapy unavailable to 97% of people with urgent mental health need
Publicly funded physician psychotherapy is only available to a fraction of those with urgent mental health needs in Ontario, according to a joint study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and ICES published today in CMAJ Open.
Bristol pioneers use of VR for designing new drugs
Researchers at the University of Bristol are pioneering the use of virtual reality (VR) as a tool to design the next generation of drug treatments.
Breakthrough made towards building the world's most powerful particle accelerator
An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has for the first time succeeded in demonstrating the ionization cooling of muons.
Bronze Age diet and farming strategy reconstructed using integrative isotope analysis
Isotope analysis of two Bronze Age El Algar sites in present-day south-eastern Spain provides a integrated picture of diets and farming strategies, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Corina Knipper from the Curt Engelhorn Center for Archaeometry, Germany, and colleagues.
Grainger engineers voice localization techniques for smart speakers
Smart speakers offer a variety of capabilities to help free up both our time and our hands.
Microbes play important role in soil's nitrogen cycle
But different microbes have distinct roles to play, and environmental factors influence activity.
Magic twist angles of graphene sheets identified
Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and can be as much as 6 times lighter.
Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs
A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you'd repair a flat tire.
The inactivated human receptor will help to create effective drugs
Scientists from China and Russia found a new way of searching for new drug candidates by inactivating the molecular structure of the human muscarinic receptor and applying screening to find drugs that it responds to.
Newer anti-HIV drugs safest, most effective during pregnancy
The antiretroviral drugs dolutegravir and emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (DTG+FTC/TAF) may comprise the safest and most effective HIV treatment regimen currently available during pregnancy, researchers announced today.
Study: Layoffs lead to higher rates of violent offenses and property crimes
Displaced workers experienced a 20% increase in criminal charges the year after being laid off
Heavy stress and lifestyle can predict how long we live
Life expectancy is influenced not only by the traditional lifestyle-related risk factors but also by factors related to a person's quality of life, such as heavy stress.
Antibiotics: City dwellers and children take the most
City dwellers take more antibiotics than people in rural areas; children and the elderly use them more often than middle-aged people; the use of antibiotics decreases as education increases, but only in rich countries: These are three of the more striking trends identified by researchers of the NRW Forschungskolleg ''One Health and Urban Transformation'' at the University of Bonn.
Microbial DNA in patient blood may be tell-tale sign of cancer
From a simple blood draw, microbial DNA may reveal who has cancer and which type, even at early stages.
Researchers promote cancer cell growth in the near infrared region by using silica coated gold nano
In a report published in NANO, a group of researchers from the Republic of Korea have discovered a method to promote cancer cell growth using silica-coated gold nanorods.
Researchers find new minor planets beyond Neptune
Using data from the Dark Energy Survey, researchers have found and cataloged more than 300 minor planets beyond Neptune, including more than 100 new discoveries.
Virtual reality shows promise for early detection of MS balance problems
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) often have a greatly increased risk of falling and injuring themselves even when they feel they're able to walk normally.
Is intensive agriculture reducing mourning dove reproduction in the eastern US?
Populations of some common bird species, including the familiar mourning dove, have been on the decline in North America.
Climate change could threaten sea snails in mid-Atlantic waters
Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk -- a type of sea snail -- in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.
Engineers crack 58-year-old puzzle on way to quantum breakthrough
A mishap during an experiment led UNSW quantum computing researchers to crack a mystery that had stood since 1961.
Permanent magnets stronger than those on refrigerator could be a solution for delivering fusion energy
Permanent magnets can, in principle, greatly simplify the design and production of the complex coils of stellarator fusion facilities.
Cycling to work linked to higher risk of injury-related hospitalization among UK commuters
Cycling to work is associated with a higher risk of admission to hospital for an injury than other modes of commuting, suggests a UK study published in The BMJ today.
Older children's brains respond differently to rewarding vs. negative experiences late in day
Older children respond more strongly to rewarding experiences and less strongly to negative experiences later in the day, which may lead to poor decision-making at night, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
People want more compensation, security for their genomic data
Genomic data donated by the public is valuable for the companies that collect it.
Sensing infection, suppressing regeneration
UIC researchers describe an enzyme that blocks the ability of blood vessel cells to self-heal.
The naming of the shrew
Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa.
Kids who blame themselves for mom's sadness are more likely to face depression and anxiety
'Even if she doesn't say it, I know it's my fault that my mother gets sad.' Kids who believe comments like this -- assuming blame for their mom's sadness or depression -- are more likely to face depression and anxiety themselves, a new study led by SMU has found.
Addressing HPV vaccination concerns
Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds a promising avenue for addressing vaccine hesitancy around HPV vaccine.
Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization
More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate pattern, can detrimentally impact these delicate marine ecosystems.
Metabolic fossils from the origin of life
Since the origin of life, metabolic networks provide cells with nutrition and energy.
AI taps human wisdom for faster, better cancer diagnosis
A new system combining artificial intelligence (AI) with human knowledge promises faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis.
More than half of Americans want money, control in exchange for genetic data
As people become more aware of privacy concerns and the ways in which genomic database companies are profiting from their data, their expectations for compensation and control may increase, according to researchers at Penn State and Cornell University.
Careless cancer cells may be susceptible to future drugs
Could the ability of cancer cells to quickly alter their genome be used as a weapon against malignant tumors?
'Vacancies' crystal defects key to improved design of lightweight aluminium alloys
Monash University researchers in Australia have used a combination of atomic-scale imaging and simulations to improve the understanding of the theta-prime strengthening phase in the aluminium copper alloy system.
Why are workers getting smaller pieces of the pie?
Market concentration in the form of 'superstar' firms has been lowering labor's share of GDP in recent decades, a new study finds.
Microbes far beneath the seafloor rely on recycling to survive
Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal how microorganisms could survive in rocks nestled thousands of feet beneath the ocean floor in the lower oceanic crust.
Artificial intelligence and family medicine: Better together
Researcher at the University of Houston are encouraging family medicine physicians to actively engage in the development and evolution of artificial intelligence to open new horizons that make AI more effective, equitable and pervasive.
Warming mountaintops put snake at risk of extinction
Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek meadow viper, a new study has found.
Scientists visualize the structure of a key enzyme that makes triglycerides
The first structure of a lipin enzyme, which carries out an important step in the production of triglycerides, the main reservoir for long-term energy storage, will help scientists to better understand how lipins regulate the production of triglycerides.
Piracy takes greater toll on small Persian gulf energy exporters
Tanker traffic through the Strait of Hormuz declines for up to two years after a piracy attack, a new Duke University study finds, but the adverse effects of the slowdown affects some Persian Gulf countries more than others.
Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations.
Giving common muscle relaxant via nose shows potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases
Delivering the medication dantrolene through the nose rather than the mouth may help the medication penetrate the brain more effectively, potentially maximizing its therapeutic benefits in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease.
Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others
A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit.
Fast-charging damages electric car batteries
Commercial fast-charging stations subject electric car batteries to high temperatures and high resistance that can cause them to crack, leak, and lose their storage capacity, write engineers at the University of California, Riverside in a new study published in Energy Storage.
Observed: An exoplanet where it rains iron
Nature magazine is publishing today a surprising study about the giant, ultra-hot planet WASP-76b in which researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have taken part.
Experimental drug combination shows potential for triple-negative breast cancer
Researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center discovered a role for MYCN in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a particularly aggressive form of the disease, and identified a potential intervention for further clinical investigation.
NIH researchers successfully stop blood vessel, tumor growth in mice
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have devised a new strategy to stop tumors from developing the new blood vessels they need to grow.
Newly confirmed biochemical mechanism in cells is key component of the anti-ageing program
Scientists from Russia, Germany and Switzerland now confirmed a mechanism in mouse, bat and naked mole rat cells -- a 'mild depolarization' of the inner mitochondrial membrane -- that is linked to ageing: Mild depolarization regulates the creation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) in cells and is therefore a mechanism of the anti-ageing program.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches development of tropical storm 21S
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm 21S.
Vision problems may be common in people with Parkinson's disease
Vision and eye problems like blurry vision, dry eyes, trouble with depth perception, and problems adjusting to rapid changes in light are much more common in people with Parkinson's disease than in people without the disorder, according to a study published in the March 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine
Below please find links to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Keeping cats indoors could blunt adverse effects to wildlife
A new study shows that hunting by house cats can have big effects on local animal populations because they kill more prey, in a given area, than similar-sized wild predators.
Caught in a spin: Spiral vortex streamlines delivery of nanomaterials into cells
Researchers from Korea University, in collaboration with the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), have developed a rapid and efficient device that uses the power of a tiny fluid vortex to deform the cell membranes, allowing delivery of nanomaterials into cells.
Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth
'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering.
City of Hope scientists identify first invasive case of rare mold in a cancer patient
City of Hope scientists have found a toxic fungus previously thought to not be infectious in the sinus tissues of a man with refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia.
Comparing risk of colorectal cancer after weight-loss surgery
Researchers used French electronic health data to investigate how risk of colorectal cancer compared among obese adults who had weight-loss surgery and who didn't.
Exercise works for those beginning cancer treatment
A researcher at James Cook University in Australia says scientists have found that exercise can be beneficial to patients as they begin treatment for prostate cancer.
Natural bayou better when floods threaten Houston
A comparison of flood plains around Houston's two major bayous shows the natural Buffalo Bayou is far better at managing floodwaters than the channelized Brays Bayou.
Room-temperature bonded interface improves cooling of gallium nitride devices
A room-temperature bonding technique for integrating wide bandgap materials such as gallium nitride (GaN) with thermally-conducting materials such as diamond could boost the cooling effect on GaN devices and facilitate better performance through higher power levels, longer device lifetime, improved reliability and reduced manufacturing costs.
Can poor air quality make you gain weight?
A new study links air pollution to changes in the human gut microbiome which could fuel diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel diseases like colitis and Crohn's disease.
JNK protein triggers nerve cells to withdraw their synapses when stressed
New study from Eleanor Coffey's lab at Turku Bioscience Center in Finland identifies that the JNK protein triggers nerve cells to withdraw their synapses when stressed.
New nano strategy fights superbugs
Rice University researchers imprint carbon nitride nanosheets to catch and kill free-floating antibiotic resistant genes found in secondary effluent produced by wastewater treatment plants.
African Americans, Hispanics less likely to receive recommended lung cancer imaging
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows African American patients were only about half as likely as non-Hispanic whites to receive PET-CT imaging during lung cancer diagnosis.
Two-pronged attack on DNA repair could kill drug-resistant cancers
Launching a two-pronged attack on cancer's ability to safeguard its DNA could offer an effective new way of treating the disease, a new study reports.
Study unveils striking disparities in health outcomes among 2 populations
In a new study published today in JAMA, a team of researchers at BIDMC evaluated how health outcomes for low-income older adults who are dually enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid have changed since the early 2000s, and whether disparities have narrowed or widened over time compared with more affluent older adults who are solely enrolled in Medicare.
For the first time, scientists observe the elusive Kondo screening cloud
In research published in Nature, an international research group have ended a fifty-year quest by directly observing a quantum phenomenon known as a Kondo screening cloud.
Study reveals a delicate dance of dynamic changes in the conscious brain
Michigan Medicine researchers studying consciousness have provided proof of alternating awareness using fMRI and illustrate, using a unique method, the ever-changing nature of the brain, even when under anesthesia or otherwise unresponsive.
LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus
Publishing in the March 16, 2020, online issue of Host, Cell and Microbe, a team of researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology, in collaboration with researchers at the J.
A hidden electronic transition 'S0 → Tn' in heavy-atom-containing molecules
Researchers in Japan have discovered S0 → Tn, a previously overlooked electronic transition in photoreactions occurring in heavy atom-containing molecules exposed to visible light.
Natural habitat around farms a win for strawberry growers, birds and consumers
Conserving natural habitat around strawberry fields can help protect growers' yields, their bottom line and the environment with no detectable threat to food safety, indicates a study led by the University of California, Davis.
Zika combats advanced-stage central nervous system tumors in dogs
The viral therapy was tested in three elderly animals with spontaneous brain tumors by a group affiliated with the FAPESP-funded Human Genome and Stem Cell Research Center.
Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater
Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization.
'Zombie' brain cells develop into working neurons
Preventing the death of neurons during brain growth means these 'zombie' cells can develop into functioning neurons, according to research in fruit flies from the Crick, the University of Lausanne (UNIL) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology.
Survey shows emergency physicians may benefit from training on safely handling firearms
Emergency physicians may benefit from training on safely handling firearms, according to the findings of a survey to be published in the March 2020 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).
Crocs' better parenting skills could make them more resilient to climate change
The ability of crocodiles to survive mass extinctions could be in part due to their more hands-on approach to parenting, say scientists at the University of Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution.
Validating a better way to stratify BPD risk in vulnerable newborns
Factoring in the total number of days that extremely preterm infants require supplemental oxygen and tracking this metric for weeks longer than usual improves clinicians' ability to predict respiratory outcomes according to bronchopulmonary dysplasia severity, finds research led by Children's National Hospital.
Updated guidelines for exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields published in Health Physics
A set of updated, evidence-based guidelines defining safe levels of exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has been published in Health Physics, official journal of the Health Physics Society.
ESO telescope observes exoplanet where it rains iron
Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have observed an extreme planet where they suspect it rains iron.
Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paige dePolo and Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and colleagues.
Next gen 911 services are highly vulnerable to cyberattacks -- Ben-Gurion researchers
In recent years, organizations have experienced countless DDoS attacks, during which internet-connected devices are flooded with traffic -- often generated by many computers or phones called 'bots' that are infected by malware by a hacker and act in concert with each other.
Breastfeeding guide aims to help docs ease moms through tough 1st week
The guide aims to address gaps in knowledge and support created in previous decades when breastfeeding was far less common.
World's first experimental observation of a Kondo cloud
Physicists have been trying to observe the quantum phenomenon Kondo cloud for many decades.
Immunosuppressive therapy for inflammatory bowel disease does not increase women's risk of vulvar or vaginal cancer
In a new retrospective study, researchers found that the use of immunosuppressive therapy does not increase the occurrence or recurrence of vulvar or vaginal cancer in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
Detecting aromas in aged cognac
For connoisseurs of wines and spirits, part of the enjoyment is noting the various flavors and scents that are revealed with each sip.
Researchers identify marker that may predict whether lung cancer likely to spread
Researchers at Tulane University have identified a protein on tumor-derived extracellular vesicles that indicates if a NSCLC tumor is likely to metastasize, according to a new study in Science Advances.
Bumblebees aversion to pumpkin pollen may help plants thrive
Cornell University researchers have found that squash and pumpkin pollen have physical, nutritional and chemical defense qualities that are harmful to bumblebees.
Deciphering disorder
Researchers have combined experimental and theoretical techniques to measure atomic positions of all the atoms in a 2D material and calculate how the arrangement impacts the electronic properties of various regions of the system.
Sorry, Einstein: Hard workers may make better role models than geniuses
Role models are important for aspiring scientists, but new research suggests that scientists who are known for their hard work -- like Thomas Edison -- are more motivating than scientists who are viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein.
Gasdermin E: A new approach to cancer immunotherapy that could have broad reach
Tumors have various ways of dodging attacks by the immune system.
Clemson geneticists' collaborative research sheds light on 'dark' portion of genome
Clemson University faculty Robert Anholt and Trudy Mackay have recently published work that identifies new portions of the fruit fly genome that, until now, have been hidden in 'dark' silent areas.
Rural Hondurans embrace cancer screening opportunities
Few people in low-income countries have access to cancer screening and their cancer rates are on the rise.
Diet has an impact on the multiple sclerosis disease course
The short-chain fatty acid propionic acid influences the intestine-mediated immune regulation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Understanding how monomer sequence affects conductance in 'molecular wires'
A new study from the Schroeder and Moore groups at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides an unprecedented look at how monomer sequence affects charge transport in precisely defined chain molecules.
Alcoholics Anonymous most effective path to alcohol abstinence
Alcoholics Anonymous, the worldwide fellowship of sobriety seekers, is the most effective path to abstinence, according to a comprehensive analysis conducted by a Stanford School of Medicine researcher and his collaborators.
Newly proposed method offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology proposed a new method that offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass.
Fossil footprints show stegosaurs left their mark on Scottish isle
They are among the most recognizable dinosaurs -- now paleontologists have discovered that stegosaurs left a lasting impression on a Scottish island.
New error correction method provides key step toward quantum computing
An Army project devised a novel approach for quantum error correction that could provide a key step toward practical quantum computers, sensors and distributed quantum information that would enable the military to potentially solve previously intractable problems or deploy sensors with higher magnetic and electric field sensitivities.
Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks
In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018.
University of Minnesota first to prove new method to grow human blood vessels
A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School recently proved the ability to grow human-derived blood vessels in a pig -- a novel approach that has the potential for providing unlimited human vessels for transplant purposes.
Discovery of smallest known mesozoic dinosaur reveals new species in bird evolution
The discovery of a small, bird-like skull, described in an article in Nature, reveals a new species, Oculudentavis khaungraae, that could represent the smallest known Mesozoic dinosaur in the fossil record.
Sugar tax has more public support than expected
The increase in diet-related illness has led to a high burden of costs for society.
How secure are four and six-digit mobile phone PINs?
A German-American team of IT security researchers has investigated how users choose the PIN for their mobile phones and how they can be convinced to use a more secure number combination.
Wireless, skin-mounted sensors monitor babies, pregnant women in the developing world
Researchers have developed a new wireless, battery-charged, affordable monitoring system for newborn babies that can easily be implemented to provide clinical-grade care in nearly any setting.
Popular painkiller ibuprofen affects liver enzymes in mice
The popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought, according to new research from UC Davis.
Alcoholics Anonymous and Twelve-Step programs help people to recover from alcohol problems
Newly updated evidence published in the Cochrane Library today compares Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and clinically-related Twelve-Step Facilitation (TSF) programs with other treatments, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, to see if they help people who suffer from alcohol use disorders achieve sobriety or reduce the amount of alcohol that they consume.
Power struggles hinder urban adaptation policies to climate change
Transformative actions implemented by cities to address and mitigate the impacts of climate change may be hindered by political struggles for municipal power.
Single biological factor predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species
Researchers have explained how visual cortexes develop uniquely across the brains of different mammalian species.
Magnolia bark compound could someday help treat drug-resistant epilepsy
In patients with epilepsy, normal neurological activity becomes disrupted, causing debilitating seizures.
The status of women
What drives people seek to high social status? A common evolutionary explanation suggests men do so because, in the past, they were able to leverage their social position into producing more children and propagating their genes.

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