Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 20, 2020
Knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19 among the general public in the US, UK
Knowledge and perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 among the general public in the United States and the United Kingdom: A cross-sectional online survey

Novel bacterial acid tolerance system sheds light on development of antimicrobials
A research team led by Professors XIAN Mo and ZHAO Guang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) discovered a novel bacterial acid tolerance system, which confers the growth capability to E. coli at pH of 4.2.

Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast
A previously unknown significant source of carbon just discovered in the Arctic has scientists marveling at a once overlooked contributor to local coastal ecosystems -- and concerned about what it may mean in an era of climate change.

Epigenetic inheritance: A silver bullet against climate change?
The rapid pace of climate change threatens all living species.

Surprise! Ammonia emitted from fertilized paddy fields mostly doesn't end up in the air
A new study indicates that ammonia deposition in the neighborhood of sources can largely reduce the amount of emitted ammonia entering the atmosphere, and thus can reduce atmospheric ammonia pollution.

A pigment from ancient Egypt to modern microscopy
Egyptian blue is one of the oldest manmade colour pigments.

Device brings silicon computing power to brain research and prosthetics
A new device enables researchers to observe hundreds of neurons in the brain in real-time.

HKU marine biologist and international team unveil impacts of heatwave on reef fishes
Dr Celia Schunter from the School of Biological Sciences at The University of Hong Kong and a team of international scientists conducted a study to understand the molecular response of five species to the 2016 heatwave conditions that killed a third of the Great Barrier Reef corals.

FSU Research: Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast
FSU researcher Robert Spencer co-authored a study that showed evidence of undetected concentrations and flows of dissolved organic matter entering Arctic coastal waters, coming from groundwater flows on top of frozen permafrost.

Cancer patients over 65, on multiple medicines, are at higher risk of hospitalization
Older patients with prostate, breast, or lung cancer are more likely to be hospitalized after chemotherapy if they take more than five other medicines.

Dementia test to expand diagnosis across India
A standardised test that can now be used in the seven main languages in India will support the diagnosis of dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

Antibiotic intercepts building blocks of the bacterial envelope
One of the last arrows in the quiver in the fight against dangerous bacteria is the reserve antibiotic daptomycin.

Oncotarget Early prediction of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 11 reported that at clinical progression, 64 EGFR T790M plasma positive patients were subjected to second line-treatment with osimertinib and strictly monitored during the first month of therapy.

Tiny double accelerator recycles energy
A team of DESY scientists has built a miniature double particle accelerator that can recycle some of the laser energy fed into the system to boost the energy of the accelerated electrons a second time.

Researchers invent method to unlock potential of widely used drug
The blood-thinning drug heparin is used all over the world.

NASA find Herold a fading ex-tropical cyclone
Former Tropical Cyclone Herold is now a fading area of low-pressure in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image.

CNIC scientists identify an immunological regulatory circuit that may play a central role in ocular diseases
The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, opens new perspectives on the study and treatment of vascular diseases of the retina and inflammatory disorders that affect the eye choroid.

Autism rates declining among wealthy whites, while escalating among poor, minorities
Wealthy, white California counties -- once considered the nation's hotbeds for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) -- have seen prevalence flatten or fall in the last two decades, while rates among poor whites and minorities keep ticking up, new CU Boulder research has found.

Study reveals how long COVID-19 remains infectious on cardboard, metal and plastic
The virus that causes COVID-19 remains for several hours to days on surfaces and in aerosols, a new scientific study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found.

New satellite-based algorithm pinpoints crop water use
The growing threat of drought and rising water demand have made accurate forecasts of crop water use critical for farmland water management and sustainability.

Health forums: Style of language influences credibility and trust
Informations on health topics in Internet forums are often so complex that laypersons are barely able to form considered judgements on the advice.

Does coronary microvascular spasm exist?
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; Fabian Guenther, Andreas Seitz, Valeria Martínez Pereyra, Raffi Bekeredjian, Udo Sechtem and Peter Ong from the Department of Cardiology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart, Germany consider whether coronary microvascular spasm exists.

A milestone in ultrafast gel fabrication
Alexander von Humboldt research fellow Ran Du opens up new space for both fundamental and application-orientated studies for noble metal gels and other systems at TU Dresden.

Study finds molecule in lymphatic system implicated in autoimmune diseases
A study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has discovered a molecule in the lymphatic system that has the potential to play a role in autoimmune disease.

Oncotarget Quizartinib, a selective FLT3 inhibitor, maintains antileukemic activity
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 11 reported that in this preclinical study, we characterized the binding affinity and selectivity of quizartinib, a small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3, and AC886, the active metabolite of quizartinib, compared with those of other FLT3 inhibitors.

Coronavirus SARS-CoV2: BESSY II data accelerate drug development
A coronavirus is keeping the world in suspense. SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and can cause severe pneumonia (COVID-19).

Reanalysis of global amphibian crisis study finds important flaws
Last year in the journal Science, a research review concluded that the chytrid fungus caused the decline of at least 501 amphibian species, of which 90 have gone extinct.

American College of Cardiology issues clinical competencies for cardiovascular NPs, PAs
The American College of Cardiology has released the 2020 Clinical Competencies for Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in Adult Cardiovascular Medicine, identifying the knowledge and skills that are important for nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in general cardiovascular medicine and cardiovascular medicine subspecialty areas.

On-demand glass is right around the corner
A research group coordinated by physicists of the University of Trento was able to probe internal stress in colloidal glasses, a crucial step to control the mechanical properties of glasses.

Oncotarget DOT1L inhibition is lethal for multiple myeloma due to perturbation
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 11 reported that in order to understand the molecular mechanism of the dependency in MM, the research team examined gene expression changes upon DOT1L inhibition in sensitive and insensitive cell lines and discovered that genes belonging to the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway and protein synthesis machinery were specifically suppressed in sensitive cells.

Russian scientists propose new approach to measuring atoms
Today, when new drugs are designed with the help of supercomputers, and electronic devices operate on a nanoscale, it is very important for scientists to understand how neighboring molecules behave towards each other.

New drug can ease the side effects of medication against severe depression
Today, severe depressions require a high dose of antidepressants. However, the high dose may also cause serious side effects.

Water-balloon physics is high-impact science
Princeton researchers have established the definitive physical rules governing capsule impact, a research area that had gone virtually unexplored until now.

Research shows most bird feed contains troublesome weed seeds
Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby.

On the trail of organic solar cells' efficiency
Scientists at TU Dresden and Hasselt University in Belgium investigated the physical causes that limit the efficiency of novel solar cells based on organic molecular materials.

How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
Researchers at MIT have come up with a way of getting conductive polymer gels to adhere to wet surfaces.

AI may help predict responses to non-small cell lung cancer systemic therapies
Using standard-of-care computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers utilized artificial intelligence (AI) to train algorithms to predict tumor sensitivity to three systemic cancer therapies.

Device could 'hear' disease through structures housing cells
Researchers have built a device that uses sound waves to detect the stiffness of an extracellular matrix, a structural network that contains cells.

Waterborne polyurea/urethanes significantly reduce hydrate growth rate in pipelines
A series of inhibitors has appeared with new reagents based on water-soluble polyurethanes.

Vivli to launch a portal for sharing data from COVID-19 trials
Vivli, the Center for Clinical Research Data, has committed to serving the open science community through the launch of a COVID-19 portal for sharing of completed interventional treatment trial data.

Oncotarget Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL): a review of the literature
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 11 reported that relapsed APL, particularly in the high-risk subset of patients, remains an important clinical problem.

Impact of a second Dust Bowl would be felt worldwide
The climate crisis means that an agricultural disaster comparable to the Dust Bowl of the Great Depression can't be excluded in the long term.

Supporting clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic
All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public.

New brain reading technology could help the development of brainwave-controlled devices
A new method to accurately record brain activity at scale has been developed by researchers at the Crick, Stanford University and UCL.

Photons and electrons one on one
The dynamics of electrons changes ever so slightly on each interaction with a photon.

Ammonia has been wrongly missing in portraying air pollution impacts
Ammonia plays a vital role in nitrogen deposition and haze pollution.

How the brain controls the voice
A particular neuronal circuit in the brains of bats controls their vocalisations.

Research reveals why some prostate cancers are more aggressive
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have discovered why some prostate cancers are more aggressive, spread to different parts of the body, and ultimately cause death.

How and where to allocate stockpiled ventilators during a pandemic
Key factors must be taken into account in determining the need for and allocation of scarce ventilators during a severe pandemic, especially one causing respiratory illness.
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