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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 27, 2020


New in vivo priming strategy to train stem cells can enhance cardiac repair effectiveness
A stem cell biologist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), together with his collaborators, has developed a novel strategy, called in vivo priming, to 'train' the stem cells to stay strong after implantation to the damaged heart via the 3D-printed bandage-like patch.
Cellular train track deformities shed light on neurological disease
A new technique allows researchers to test how the deformation of tiny train track-like cell proteins affects their function.
In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction
Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that the terrestrial extinctions from Gondwana occurred at the same time as the better-documented marine extinctions.
Global supply chains as a way to curb carbon emissions
The coronavirus outbreak raised everyone's awareness of the significance of global supply chains to modern economies.
Highly efficient and stable double layer solar cell developed
A KAIST research team has developed a new type of solar cell that can both withstand environmental hazards and is 26.7% efficient in power conversion.
ALMA resolves gas impacted by young jets from supermassive black hole
Astronomers obtained the first resolved image of disturbed gaseous clouds in a galaxy 11 billion light-years away by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).
Better, safer batteries
For the first time, researchers who explore the physical and chemical properties of electrical energy storage have found a new way to improve lithium-ion batteries.
Cardiovascular implications of fatal outcomes of patients with COVID-19
Evaluating the association of underlying cardiovascular disease and myocardial injury on fatal outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
COVID-19 alert: Heart and kidney patients should keep taking their medicines
As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds, inaccurate medical information has flooded social media and other channels.
Physicist from Hannover develops new photon source for tap-proof communication
An international team with the participation of Prof. Dr. Michael Kues from the Cluster of Excellence PhoenixD at Leibniz University Hannover has developed a new method for generating quantum-entangled photons in a spectral range of light that was previously inaccessible.
Study compares funding, research productivity for 2 diseases
This study compared federal and foundation research funding for sickle cell disease and cystic fibrosis and investigated whether funding was associated with differences in drug development and research productivity.
A new way to study HIV's impact on the brain
Using a newly developed laboratory model of three types of brain cells, Penn and CHOP scientists reveal how HIV infection -- as well as the drugs that treat it -- can take a toll on the central nervous system.
Cardiac involvement in a patient with COVID-19
A description of the presentation of acute myocardial inflammation in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who recovered from influenzalike syndrome and developed fatigue and signs and symptoms of heart failure a week after upper respiratory tract symptoms.
Triple-threat genetic toolkit aids with eco-friendly chemical production
To reduce dependence on nonrenewable fossil fuels, scientists are investigating renewable biomass as a host for valuable compound production.
Lessons from the Spanish flu: Early restrictions lowered disease, mortality rates
A review of published data and analysis on the Spanish flu, found that cities that adopted early and broad isolation and prevention measures had disease and mortality rates that were 30% to 50% lower than other cities.
A lifesaving reason to have more women on boards: ensuring consumer safety
In a study published online yesterday focused on the medical products industry -- which includes medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biologics -- a group of researchers found that, compared to firms with all-male boards, firms with female directors announced high-severity product recalls 28 days sooner.
Benefiting from the national gene vector biorepository
Gene therapy investigators can greatly benefit from the resources and services provided by the National Gene Vector Biorepository (NGVB), housed at the Indiana University School of Medicine.
How customers search for hedonic versus utilitarian purchases
Consumers browse social media and product pages two weeks before final hedonic purchases, utilize third-party reviews up to two weeks before final utilitarian purchases, and use search engines, deals, and competitors' product pages closer to utilitarian purchases.
Cancer care in the time of COVID-19
Below please find link(s) to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Scientist uses 'mini brains' to model how to prevent development of abnormally small heads
A scientist is one step closer to discovering what weakens a pathogen that appears to cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads or microcephaly.
COVID-19 linked to cardiac injury, worse outcomes for patients with heart conditions
COVID-19 can have fatal consequences for people with underlying cardiovascular disease and cause cardiac injury even in patients without underlying heart conditions, according to a review published today in JAMA Cardiology by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
New drug could reverse treatment resistance in advanced multiple myeloma
Researchers at the VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands have tested a new drug in patient samples and mice with multiple myeloma and discovered that it was effective even in advanced disease -- a point when many patients currently run out of options.
Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, NIH study suggests
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility -- the ability to adapt to changing situations.
'McDonaldization' based analysis of Russian social networks
The author describes his concept this way: 'the principles of the fast-food restaurant are coming to dominate more and more sectors of recent'.
Control of anthropogenic atmospheric emissions can improve water quality in seas
A new HKU research highlighted the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality of China's coastal waters.
Disasters can affect cervical cancer screening for years
Screening is important for the early detection of cervical cancer, but rates were significantly affected, in some areas for years, following a devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan.
A plant-based diet helps to prevent and manage asthma, according to new review
A plant-based diet can help prevent and manage asthma, while dairy products and high-fat foods raise the risk, according to a new review published in Nutrition in Clinical Care.
Oncotarget Characterization of iPS87, a prostate cancer stem cell-like cell line
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 12 reported outside its natural niche, the cultured prostate cancer stem cells lost their tumor-inducing capability and stem cell marker expression after approximately 8 transfers at a 1:3 split ratio.
I won't have what he's having: The brain and socially motivated behavior
Monkeys devalue rewards when they anticipate that another monkey will get them instead.
Scientists identify gene that first slows, then accelerates, progression of ALS in mice
Columbia scientists have provided new insights into how mutations in a gene called TBK1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that robs patients of movement, speech and ultimately, their lives.
Overdose risk among youth with family members prescribed opioids
In this study of 72,000 adolescents and young adults, higher risk of youth overdose was associated with exposure to family members with opioid prescriptions and young people's own opioid prescriptions.
Forgotten tale of phage therapy history revealed
In the current situation when the fear of virus infections in the public is common, it is good to remember that some viruses can be extremely beneficial for mankind, even save lives.
A funnel of light
Physicists of the University of Würzburg, in a joint collaboration with colleagues from the University of Rostock, have developed a light funnel apparatus.
Astronaut urine to build moon bases
The modules that the major space agencies plan to erect on the Moon could incorporate an element contributed by the human colonizers themselves: the urea in their pee.
Quantum copycat: Researchers find a new way in which bosons behave like fermions
When a one-dimensional gas of strongly interacting bosons expands, the velocity distribution of the bosons transforms into one that is identical to non-interacting fermions.
Multi-stage deformation process in high-entropy alloys at ultra-low temperatures revealed
An international research team led by scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered that high-entropy alloys (HEAs) exhibit exceptional mechanical properties at ultra-low temperatures due to the coexistence of multiple deformation mechanisms.
Seafloor of Fram Strait is a sink for microplastic from Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean
Working in the Arctic Fram Strait, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have found microplastic throughout the water column with particularly high concentrations at the ocean floor.
Double-walled nanotubes have electro-optical advantages
Rice University theorists find that flexoelectric effects in double-walled carbon nanotubes could be highly useful for photovoltaic applications.
How to boost immune response to vaccines in older people
Identifying interventions that improve vaccine efficacy in older persons is vital to deliver healthy ageing for an ageing population.
Researchers develop faster way to replace bad info in networks
Researchers have demonstrated a new model of how competing pieces of information spread in online social networks and the Internet of Things (IoT).
Some COVID-19 patients still have coronavirus after symptoms disappear
In a new study, researchers found that half of the patients they treated for mild COVID-19 infection still had coronavirus for up to eight days after symptoms disappeared.
Copper boosts pig growth, and now we know why
Pigs have better feed conversion rates with copper in their diets, but until now, scientists didn't fully understand why.
Addressing unhealthy lifestyles could increase life expectancy of those with severe mental illness
Researchers from King's College London have shown that a combination of approaches that aim to address unhealthy lifestyles, access to healthcare and social issues could reduce the gap in life expectancies by around 28% between those with severe mental illness (SMI) and the general population.
German scientists identify microbe that could help degrade polyurethane-based plastics
One of the most widely used oil-based plastics, polyurethane, is particularly hard to recycle or destroy safely.
Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University.
Animals keep viruses in the sea in balance
A variety of sea animals can take up virus particles while filtering seawater for oxygen and food.
Scientists find a way to extract color from black
Scientists have developed a way of extracting a richer palette of colors from the available spectrum by harnessing disordered patterns inspired by nature that would typically be seen as black.
Journal of the American Geriatrics society highlights 'ABCDs' of COVID-19 for older adults
The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) this week rushed to publication a special article describing critical points for combatting the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic for older adults and those in long-term care.
Bubbles go with the flow
Scientists at The University of Tokyo developed a new computer simulation model that includes microbubble nucleation to explain the flow slippage of fluids inside pipes.
Small hearts have strong vortex flow, large hearts have mild vortex -- studied in dogs
An international collaboration led by veterinary scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has found that size of a dog heart affects both vortex flow and pressure difference in the heart, which both are promising as an index of expanding function.
UK local authorities not ready for the number of deaths from Covid-19
Even if fatality rates are at the lower end of expectations -- one percent of virus victims -- it is highly likely that death and bereavement services will be overwhelmed, according to newly-published research by Dr Julia Meaton, Dr Anna Williams and researcher Helen-Marie Kruger.
Zero-energy bound states in the high-temperature superconductors at 2-dimensional limit
Recently, Wang Jian group at Peking University, in collaboration with Professor Wang Ziqiang at Boston College and Professor Hu Jiangping at Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, detected novel ZEBSs resembling the characteristics of MZMs in interstitial Fe adatoms deposited on the high-temperature superconducting thin films at two-dimensional limit.
CRG standardises COVID-19 data analysis to aid international research efforts
Researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have launched a new database to advance the international research efforts studying COVID-19.
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest.
Potential effects of coronaviruses on the cardiovascular system
An overview of the basics of coronaviruses, with a focus on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) along with their effects on the cardiovascular system.

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