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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 30, 2020


Artificial intelligence can speed up the detection of stroke
Human emotion system laboratory team at the University of Turku and Turku PET Centre, Finland, introduces a fully automated method for acute ischemic lesion segmentation on brain MRIs and shows how artificial intelligence can reduce the work load of radiologists.
A 'cardiac patch with bioink' developed to repair heart
A joint research team of POSTECH, The Catholic University, and City University of Hong Kong developed an 'in vivo priming' with heart-derived bioink.
Chemicals used to replace BPA may lead to increased blood pressure
Common bisphenol A (BPA) substitutes can affect the developing fetus and cause hypertension in later life, suggests a rodent study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.
10-year data show cardiac stenting equal to CABG in preventing events
In a study with the longest follow-up to date of patients with a high-risk form of heart disease known as left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD), researchers found no significant differences in rates of death, heart attack or stroke between patients who were treated with a stent and those who underwent heart bypass surgery.
Evinacumab cuts cholesterol levels by half in patients with HoFH
The investigational drug evinacumab reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to near-normal levels among patients with a rare cholesterol disorder, meeting the primary endpoint in the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of the drug, which is being presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Mandatory building energy audits alone do not overcome barriers to energy efficiency
A pioneering law may be insufficient to incentivize significant energy use reductions in residential and office buildings, a new study finds.
Female directors are quicker to recall dangerous medical products, study shows
Some 4,500 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs and devices are pulled from shelves annually -- decisions greatly influenced by the presence of women on a firm's board, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
Exercise training better than weight loss for improving heart function in type 2 diabetes
Researchers in Leicester have shown that the function of the heart can be significantly improved in patients with type 2 diabetes through exercise.
How at risk are you of getting a virus on an airplane?
New 'CALM' model on passenger movement developed using Frontera supercomputer.
COVID-19 found in sputum and feces samples after pharyngeal specimens no longer positive
Clinicians from the Institute of Infectious Diseases at Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University found that some patients had positive real-time fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test results for SARS-CoV-2 in the sputum or feces after the pharyngeal swabs became negative.
Nafamostat is expected to prevent the transmission of new coronavirus infection (COVID-19)
Nafamostat mesylate (brand name: Fusan), which is the drug used to treat acute pancreatitis, may effectively block the requisite viral entry process the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) uses to spread and cause disease (COVID-19).
How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more.
Factors associated with discontinuation of erectile dysfunction treatment
The factors associated with men ending treatment for erectile dysfunction have been reviewed in a study published in IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal.
Increases in self-reported mental health issues, service use in Ontario
The number of people diagnosed with psychiatric disorders in Ontario remained stable between 2002 and 2014, but the number of people self-reporting mental health issues and using mental health services has increased, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
NIH-funded studies show stents and surgery no better than medication, lifestyle changes at reducing the risk for heart attack
Invasive procedures such as bypass surgery and stenting -- commonly used to treat blocked arteries -- are no better at reducing the risk for heart attack and death in patients with stable ischemic heart disease than medication and lifestyle changes alone.
Antiplatelet drugs increase risk for TAVR patients with atrial fibrillation
Patients with atrial fibrillation who took oral anticoagulants alone after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) had a lower rate of bleeding complications without an increased risk of clotting-related complications compared to patients who took antiplatelet medication in addition to oral anticoagulants, in a trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Position statement highlights importance of sleep for physician self-care
Physician burnout is a significantly underappreciated public safety issue, and sleep loss is often overlooked as a contributing factor, according to a new position statement published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Empowering rural doctors to treat advanced heart failure improves patient outcomes
Travel restrictions imposed to curb the spread of COVID-19 are making it more difficult for some heart failure patients who have artificial heart pumps to participate in follow-up care at implantation centers far from their homes.
Unique structural fluctuations at ice surface promote autoionization of water molecules
Hydrated protons at the surface of water ice are of fundamental importance in a variety of physicochemical phenomena on earth and in the universe.
Experimental AI tool predicts which COVID-19 patients develop respiratory disease
An artificial intelligence tool accurately predicted which patients newly infected with the COVID-19 virus would go on to develop severe respiratory disease, a new study found.
Oral apixaban as good as dalteparin for treating cancer-associated clots
For people with cancer, the oral blood thinner apixaban is at least as effective as dalteparin, a low molecular weight heparin given by injection, in preventing a repeat venous thromboembolism (VTE), or blood clot, with no excess in major bleeding events, according to Phase 3 trial results presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Exeter researchers discover a novel chemistry to protect our crops from fungal disease
Exeter researchers have discovered a novel chemistry to protect our crops from fungal disease.
Tiny optical cavity could make quantum networks possible
Engineers at Caltech have shown that atoms in optical cavities could be foundational to the creation of a quantum internet.
Tree rings could pin down Thera volcano eruption date
Research led by the University of Arizona Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has anchored a long sequence of tree rings, providing context for the civilizations that existed throughout the Bronze and Iron Ages, including the eruption of Thera.
Investigating SARS-CoV-2 transmission in public bath center in China
This case series reports a cluster-spreading event in Huai'an (about 435 miles northeast of Wuhan) in Jiangsu Province, China, where a patient with SARS-CoV-2 may have transmitted the virus to eight other healthy individuals through bathing in a public bath center.
Investigating association between air pollution, dementia risk and role of cardiovascular disease
This observational study analyzed data from about 2,900 older residents of Stockholm to examine the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and the risk of developing dementia, along with what role cardiovascular disease might have.
Dropping aspirin for ticagrelor alone better in complex heart disease
The research, a subanalysis of the TWILIGHT trial, was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
'Living drug factories' might treat diabetes and other diseases
Chemical engineers have developed a way to protect transplanted drug-producing cells from immune system rejection.
Changing forests
As the climate is changing, so too are the world's forests.
Drug used for liver disease also affects C. diff life cycle, reduces inflammation in mice
Researchers have found that a commonly used drug made from secondary bile acids can affect the life cycle of Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) in vitro and reduce the inflammatory response to C. diff in mice.
New mechanism underlying organelle communication revealed in brown fat cells
A new study reveals an underappreciated interplay between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria with implications for weight loss and disease.
Poor people experience greater financial hardship in areas where income inequality is greatest
In areas with the highest levels of income inequality, the poor are less likely to rely on their community for support due to shame or embarrassment, according to a study in Nature Human Behaviour.
Exercise reduces caregiver's burden in dementia care
Exercise in older adults, even at an advanced stage of dementia, is an important strategy to maintain independence in everyday living and to promote quality of life.
Rivaroxaban reduces risk in symptomatic PAD post-intervention
People with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) who took the blood thinner rivaroxaban with aspirin after undergoing a procedure to treat blocked arteries in the leg (lower extremity revascularization) had a 15% reduction in the risk of major adverse limb and cardiovascular events when compared with those receiving aspirin alone, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Use of radial artery in heart bypass surgery improves patient outcomes
Patients undergoing heart bypass surgery lived longer and had better outcomes when surgeons used a segment of an artery from their arm, called the radial artery, instead of a vein from their leg, called the saphenous vein, to create a second bypass, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Air pollution linked to dementia and cardiovascular disease
People continuously exposed to air pollution are at increased risk of dementia, especially if they also suffer from cardiovascular diseases, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAMA Neurology.
What are you looking at? 'Virtual' communication in the age of social distancing
When discussions occur face-to-face, people know where their conversational partner is looking and vice versa.
Hopes for pandemic respite this spring may depend upon what happens indoors
How much spring and summer affect the COVID-19 pandemic may depend not only on the effectiveness of social distancing measures, but also on the environment inside our buildings, according to a review of Yale scientists of their own work and that of colleagues on how respiratory viruses are transmitted.
Chest pain, stress tests warrant attention even if arteries are clear
Patients who experience chest pain and have abnormal results on a cardiac stress test but who do not have blocked arteries often experience changes in their symptoms and stress test results over time, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Wastewater test could provide early warning of COVID-19
Researchers at Cranfield University are working on a new test to detect SARS-CoV-2 in the wastewater of communities infected with the virus.
Better controlled diabetes is associated with preserved cognitive function after stroke
Better glucose control can help people with diabetes who have a common type of stroke to preserve their cognitive function, according to a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.
Cells must age for muscles to regenerate in muscle-degenerating diseases
Exercise can only improve strength in muscle-degenerating diseases when a specific type of muscle cell ages, report a Hokkaido University researcher and colleagues with Sapporo Medical University in Japan.
Solving a medical mystery and changing CDC screenings for COVID-19
UC Davis Health physicians and medical staff detail the diagnosis and treatment for first known case of community transmission of COVID-19 in the US.
Researchers reverse muscle fibrosis from overuse injury in animals, hope for human trials
High-force, high-repetition movements create microinjuries in muscle fibers. Muscle tissue responds by making repairs.
How stress remodels the brain
Stress restructures the brain by halting the production of crucial ion channel proteins, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.
Ecosystem services are not constrained by borders
What do chocolate, migratory birds, flood control and pandas have in common?
Experts call for health and climate change warning labels on petrol pumps
Warning labels should be displayed on petrol pumps, energy bills, and airline tickets to encourage consumers to question their own use of fossil fuels, say health experts in The BMJ today.
Vericiguat improves outcomes in patients with worsening heart failure
Patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction who received the investigational drug vericiguat had a significantly lower rate of cardiovascular death or heart failure hospitalization compared with those receiving a placebo, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Diabetes care reaches new heights as drone delivers insulin for patient
The international medical team that accomplished the world's first documented drone delivery of insulin for a patient living in a remote community described the project in an ENDO 2020 abstract that will be published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
New metabolism discovered in bacteria
Microbiologists at Goethe University Frankfurt have discovered how the bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses hydrogen in a kind of cycle to conserve energy.
E-Cigarettes more effective than counseling alone for smoking cessation
Smokers who received smoking cessation counseling and used electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) containing nicotine were more than twice as likely to successfully quit smoking compared to those who received counseling but did not use e-cigarettes, in a clinical trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
New Yorkers think feds not doing enough for the city and state
A majority (56%) of New York City residents did not think the assistance provided by the federal government for NYC and the state as a whole is sufficient to manage the current coronavirus crisis.
Study finds 'smart' devices effective in reducing adverse outcomes of heart condition
A new study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, highlights the feasible use of mobile health (mHealth) devices to help with the screening and detection of a common heart condition.
Rivaroxaban superior to heparin in preventing blood clots after common orthopedic surgeries
The direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban dramatically cut the likelihood of serious venous thromboembolism (VTE) in people recovering from lower limb orthopedic surgery requiring immobilization in comparison with enoxaparin, another anticoagulant agent, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Where lions roam: West African big cats show no preference between national parks, hunting zones
West African lions are a critically endangered subpopulation, with an estimated 400 remaining and strong evidence of ongoing declines.
Advances in production of retinal cells for treating blindness
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and St Erik Eye Hospital in Sweden have discovered a way to refine the production of retinal cells from embryonic stem cells for treating blindness in the elderly.
(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis.
HKU team develops new wastewater treatment process
A University of Hong Kong research team has developed a novel wastewater treatment system that can effectively remove conventional pollutants, and recover valuable resources such as phosphorus and organic materials.
Microelectronics for birds
Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Blood test detects wide range of cancers, available to at risk individuals in clinical study
In a study involving thousands of participants, a new blood test detected more than 50 types of cancer as well as their location within the body with a high degree of accuracy, according to an international team of researchers led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
New therapeutic strategies proposed for some lung and kidney cancers
New therapeutic strategies proposed for some lung and kidney cancers.
Heart attack on a chip: Scientists model conditions of ischemia on a microfluidic device
Researchers invented a microfluidic chip containing cardiac cells that is capable of mimicking hypoxic conditions following a heart attack - specifically when an artery is blocked in the heart and then unblocked after treatment.
How social media makes it difficult to identify real news
There's a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests.
Risk of death from stroke falls by 24%
Thousands more patients each year are surviving strokes, as the risk of death and disability after a stroke fell significantly between 2000 and 2015, according to analysis by Guy's and St Thomas' researchers.
A Martian mash up: Meteorites tell story of Mars' water history
University of Arizona researchers probed Martian meteorites to reconstruct Mars' chaotic history.
'Revita' improves blood glucose levels, liver metabolic health in type 2 diabetes
Patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes who underwent a novel, minimally invasive, endoscopic procedure called Revita® duodenal mucosal resurfacing (DMR) had significantly improved blood glucose (sugar) levels, liver insulin sensitivity, and other metabolic measures three months later, according to new data from the REVITA-2 study.
Study helps to identify medications which are safe to use in treatment of COVID-19
A recent study has found that there is no evidence for or against the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen for patients with COVID-19.
Fast-fail trial shows new approach to identifying brain targets for clinical treatments
A first-of-its-kind trial has demonstrated that a receptor involved in the brain's reward system may be a viable target for treating anhedonia (or lack of pleasure), a key symptom of several mood and anxiety disorders.
Critical care surgery team develops blueprint for essential operations during COVID-19
To help guide hospital surgery departments through this crisis, the acute surgery division at Atrium Health's Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., has developed a tiered plan for marshaling limited resources.
Bison in northern Yellowstone proving to be too much of a good thing
Increasing numbers of bison in Yellowstone National Park in recent years have become a barrier to ecosystem recovery in the iconic Lamar Valley in the northern part of the park.
Medtronic MiniMed 670G insulin pump allows 'excellent' blood glucose control
Patients with type 1 diabetes who use Medtronic's MiniMedTM 670G insulin pump system are able to maintain blood glucose levels in the targeted range over 71% of the time, according to a study that analyzed some 6 million days of real-world data.
LANL news: High altitude water Cherenkov Observatory tests speed of light
New measurements confirm, to the highest energies yet explored, that the laws of physics hold no matter where you are or how fast you're moving.
Mystery solved: The origin of the colors in the first color photographs
A palette of colours on a silver plate: that is what the world's first colour photograph looks like.
A new tool for controlling reactions in microrobots and microreactors
In a new paper, Thomas Russell and postdoctoral fellow Ganhua Xie, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, report that they have used capillary forces to develop a simple method for producing self-assembling hanging droplets of an aqueous polymer solution from the surface of a second aqueous polymer solution in well-ordered arrays.
New explanation for sudden heat collapses in plasmas can help create fusion energy
PPPL researchers find that jumbled magnetic fields in the core of fusion plasmas can cause the entire plasma discharge to suddenly collapse.
Surfing the waves: Electrons break law to go with the flow
Researchers measure how fluid changes the movement of electrons.
Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue.
Genetic testing for antiplatelet therapy post-PCI misses cut in cardiovascular events
An international clinical trial that used genetic testing to guide which antiplatelet medication was given to patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) did not meet its stated goal for cutting in half the incidence of serious adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in the year following the procedure, according to study results presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Study finds room for improvement in TAVR outcomes across US
Thirty-four medical centers, representing 11% of facilities that perform transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the U.S., saw worse than expected outcomes in terms of survival and quality of life among patients undergoing the procedure in an analysis presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Well-engineered 'watercourts' stored live fish, fueling Florida's Calusa kingdom
Fishing powered the mighty Calusa, who ruled South Florida for centuries.
The desire for information: Blissful ignorance or painful truth?
A new study looks closely at why many people are so likely to avoid useful information -- even if it benefits their health.
Water pressure: Ancient aquatic crocs evolved, enlarged to avoid freezing
Ancient crocodilian ancestors that abandoned land for water nearly 200 million years ago supposedly got larger because they were released from the constraints of gravity, territory and diet.
Researchers discover potential boost to immunotherapy
Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a pathway that regulates special immune system cells in lung cancer tumors, suppressing them and allowing tumors to grow.
Clopidogrel atop rivaroxaban and aspirin shows no added benefit for PAD
The results of VOYAGER PAD found that people with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who took the blood thinner rivaroxaban with aspirin after undergoing lower extremity revascularization -- a procedure to treat blocked arteries in the leg -- had a significant reduction in the risk of major adverse limb and cardiovascular events when compared with those receiving aspirin alone, according to a subgroup analysis from VOYAGER PAD presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Moffitt identifies novel therapeutic targets in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center want to devise better therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC) by improving their understanding of how the disease develops.
Ticagrelor alone, without aspirin, shows benefit in patients with diabetes
Patients with diabetes who stopped taking aspirin three months after the insertion of a coronary stent and then took the anti-platelet medication ticagrelor alone for a year had fewer episodes of bleeding and no increase in heart attacks, stroke or other adverse events caused by blockages in the arteries, compared with patients who took both aspirin and ticagrelor for a year.
Argonne and CERN weigh in on the origin of heavy elements
Nuclear physicists from Argonne National Laboratory led an international physics experiment conducted at CERN that utilizes novel techniques developed at Argonne to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe.
Biological 'atlas' shows dual personality for immune cells that cause Type 1 diabetes
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital mapped the epigenetic controls on T cells, which could aid Type 1 diabetes diagnosis and treatment, as well as cancer immunotherapy.
Screening of zebrafish identifies gene involved in human nicotine addiction
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have shown that zebrafish can provide genetic clues to smoking, a complex human behaviour.
Boosts in serum EPA levels from prescription fish oil drive heart benefits
Higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) found in the blood--and not a decrease in triglyceride levels as originally thought--appear to explain the striking reductions in cardiovascular events and deaths seen among people taking 4 grams daily of the prescription fish oil, icosapent ethyl, according to findings from a REDUCE-IT substudy presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Alirocumab substantially reduces cholesterol in adult patients with HoFH
The cholesterol drug alirocumab reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 35.6% compared to placebo in adult patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), according to a phase three clinical trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees.
Blood test accurately detects over 50 types of cancer, often before symptoms show
Researchers have developed the first blood test that can accurately detect more than 50 types of cancer and identify in which tissue the cancer originated, often before there are any signs of the disease.
Bariatric surgery before diabetes develops leads to greater weight loss
Obese patients may lose more weight if they undergo bariatric surgery before they develop diabetes, suggests a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.
A chemical embrace from the perfect host
A molecule with a hollow center proves ideal for separating a common industrial chemical mixture.
Sturgeon genome sequenced
Sturgeons lived on earth already 300 million years ago and yet their external appearance seems to have undergone very little change.
Comparing recall rates, cancer detection in breast cancer screenings
Nearly 200 radiologists who interpreted about 251,000 digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2 million digital mammography screening examinations were included in this observational study that evaluated recall and cancer detection rates.
Loss of gland in eyelids may be a biomarker for elevated blood glucose in diabetes
In patients with diabetes, loss of the gland that helps lubricate the eye may be a sign of elevated blood glucose levels, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.
TAVR equivalent to surgery at 2 years among low-risk patients
Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) fared equally well compared with those undergoing open heart valve replacement surgery in terms of the combined risk of death, stroke or rehospitalization at two years, the primary endpoint of the PARTNER 3 trial being presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
APS tip sheet: Untangling neurons with scattered light
New analysis examines light scattering properties in brain tissue to better understand the three-dimensional structure of nerve fibers.
Pregnant women's PFAS exposure linked to granddaughters' obesity risk
The first human study to link blood levels of 'forever' chemicals known as PFAS in pregnant women with the risk of obesity in their granddaughters is described in an ENDO 2020 abstract that will be published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
Projecting the outcomes of people's lives with AI isn't so simple
The results suggest that sociologists and data scientists should use caution when using predictive modeling, especially in the criminal justice system and social programs.
New research sheds light on potentially negative effects of cannabis
Coughing fits, anxiety and paranoia are three of the most common adverse reactions to cannabis, according to a recent study by Washington State University researchers.
TAVR found non-inferior to surgery in broad patient population
Patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) did not have a higher rate of death at one year compared with those who had their heart valve replaced via open-heart surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
HSC professor on team using stem cells to combat COVID-19 pneumonia
Dr. Jin said early findings are promising, and their international effort to test this treatment continues as a long-term study with more patients in China.
Extreme, high temperatures may double or triple heart-related deaths
In Kuwait, a country known for hot weather, death certificates reveal that on days when the temperatures reached extremes of an average daily temperature of 109 degrees Fahrenheit, the number of deaths from cardiovascular disease dramatically increased.
Editorial calls for a precision medicine approach to follow-up of diverticulitis
An editorial challenges physicians and the US healthcare system to reconsider the current 'one size fits all' care for diverticulitis and to employ a precision medicine approach to determine which patients should be referred for colonoscopy.
Alcohol consumption by fathers before conception could negatively impact child development
Trouble for alcoholic fathers, hope for alcoholic mothers. Scientists at the University of California, Riverside, have explored the relationship between parental alcohol consumption -- before conception in the case of fathers and during pregnancy in the case of mothers -- and offspring development.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Comprehensive COVID-19 hospitalisation and death rate estimates help countries best prepare as global pandemic unfolds
Nearly one in five over-80s infected with COVID-19 are likely to require hospitalisation, compared with around 1% of people under 30, according to an analysis of 3,665 cases in mainland China, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal
How we perceive close relationships with others determines our willingness to share food
Researchers said a better understanding of the links between attachment and food could potentially help inform efforts to extend help to people during the current coronavirus pandemic -- particularly among people with high attachment avoidance.
Benefit seen for ticagrelor alone, without aspirin, in patients with ACS
The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
New maps of Malaysian Borneo reveal worsening carbon losses along forest edges
Tropical forests are heavily fragmented as they are cleared for agricultural expansion and logging.
The placebo effect and psychedelic drugs: tripping on nothing?
A new study from McGill suggests that, in the right context, some people may experience psychedelic-like effects from placebos alone.
Saliva test for cannabis could someday help identify impaired drivers (video)
Those who consume alcohol and drive are often subjected to roadside stops, breathalyzer tests and stiff penalties if their blood alcohol content exceeds certain limits.
Using fiber optics to advance safe and renewable energy
Fiber optic cables, it turns out, can be incredibly useful scientific sensors.
Hidden messages in protein blueprints
Scientists from Heidelberg and Freiburg have identified a new control mechanism that enables stem cells to adapt their activity in emergency situations.
Does preterm delivery contribute to increased cardiovascular disease burden in women?
A new study quantifies the future economic burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women with a history of preterm delivery (PTD).
Movement toward gender equality has slowed in some areas, stalled in others
Women have made progress in earning college degrees as well as in pay and in occupations once largely dominated by men since 1970 -- but the pace of gains in many areas linked to professional advancement has slowed in recent decades and stalled in others, finds a new five-decade analysis.
The Lancet Oncology: Without additional investment 11 million children are expected to die from cancer between now and 2050
Improving care for children with cancer worldwide will bring a triple return on investment and prevent millions of needless deaths, according to a new Commission report published today by The Lancet Oncology entitled Sustainable Care for Children with Cancer.
Intravenous sodium nitrite ineffective for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, intravenous sodium nitrite given by paramedics during resuscitation did not significantly improve their chances of being admitted to or discharged from the hospital alive, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Renal denervation effective in patients with untreated hypertension
Three months after undergoing renal denervation (RDN) -- a procedure that delivers energy to overactive nerves leading to the kidney to decrease their activity -- patients with untreated high blood pressure had statistically significant reductions in average blood pressure over 24 hours compared with patients who underwent a sham procedure and experienced no major adverse effects, according to results from the SPYRAL-HTN OFF MED pivotal trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Resarchers find way to improve cancer outcomes by examining patients' genes
The genetics researchers say the approach could benefit all sorts of serious health conditions, and they're urging scientists to quickly pluck ''low hanging fruit'' for the benefit of patients.
Phage capsid against influenza: Perfectly fitting inhibitor prevents viral infection
Hope of new therapeutic options for suppressing seasonal influenza and avian flu: On the basis of an empty -- and therefore non-infectious -- shell of a phage virus, researchers from Berlin have developed a chemically modified phage capsid that ''stifles'' influenza viruses.
American Society of Nephrology provides insights on COVID-19 and kidney disease
The American Society of Nephrology has launched several initiatives to provide guidance on COVID-19 as it relates to the care of patients with kidney disease.

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