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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 03, 2020


Researchers map mechanism to explain role of gene mutations in kidney disease
Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome.
Coronavirus: Virological findings from patients treated in a Munich hospital
In early February, research teams from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, München Klinik Schwabing and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology published initial findings describing the efficient transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
New family of molecules to join altered receptors in neurodegenerative diseases
An article published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry shows a new family of molecules with high affinity to join imidazoline receptors, which are altered in the brain of those patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's.
COVID-19 infection and renin angiotensin system blockers
Discussion of recommendations for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker use in patients with or at risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Anterior insula activation restores prosocial behavior in animal model of opioid addiction
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have shown that chemogenetic activation of the anterior insula restores prosocial behavior in an animal model of opioid addiction and empathy.
Tissue dynamics provide clues to human disease
Scientists in EMBL Barcelona's Ebisuya group, with collaborators from RIKEN, Kyoto University, and Meijo Hospital in Nagoya, Japan, have studied oscillating patterns of gene expression, coordinated across time and space within a tissue grown in vitro, to explore the molecular causes of a rare human hereditary disease known as spondylocostal dysostosis.
Wearing surgical masks in public could help slow COVID-19 pandemic's advance
Surgical masks may help prevent infected people from making others sick with seasonal viruses, including coronaviruses, according to new research.
New measurements reveal evidence of elusive particles in a newly-discovered superconductor
Now a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, led by physicist Vidya Madhavan, in collaboration with researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the University of Maryland, Boston College, and ETH Zurich, have used high-resolution microscopy tools to peer at the inner-workings of an unusual type of superconductor, uranium ditelluride (UTe2).
What pediatric health care clinicians need to know
Information on the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic that is useful for pediatric clinicians is in this article.
COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate childhood obesity
Public health scientists predict that school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic will exacerbate the epidemic of childhood obesity in the United States.
Northern peatlands will lose some of their CO2 sink capacity under a warmer climate
A Nordic study sheds new light on the role of northern peatlands in regulating the regional climate.
Groundwater, a threatened resource requiring sustainable management
The WEARE group at the University of Cordoba analyzed a case of aquifer recovery and concluded that supervision, governance and use of water for high value crops are some of the keys to guaranteeing sustainability of these reserves
The Lancet Public Health: US modelling study estimates impact of school closures for COVID-19 on US health-care workforce and associated mortality
US policymakers considering physical distancing measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 face a difficult trade-off between closing schools to reduce transmission and new cases, and potential health-care worker absenteeism due to additional childcare needs that could ultimately increase mortality from COVID-19, according to new modelling research published in The Lancet Public Health journal.
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?
Melatonin controls the body clock -- high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening.
NASA sees tropical cyclone Irondro developing an eye
As Tropical Cyclone Irondro continues to move through the Southern Indian Ocean, NASA's Terra satellite saw the storm developing an eye as it continued to intensify.
One size does not fit all: Not all men idolize Western ideals of muscularity
UK researchers reported that men in Uganda and Nicaragua were generally less hung up about their body image and cared less about pursuing a muscular physique than British men.
When what-if scenarios turn real: CSU pandemic modeler providing new COVID-19 insights
School closures are intended to slow the transmission of the coronavirus.
Study of rare genetic disorder that effects the eyes
Small gauge vitrectomy for vitreous amyloidosis and subsequent management of secondary glaucoma in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.
Deep-sea worms and bacteria team up to harvest methane
Scientists uncover an unusual partnership at the bottom of the ocean.
Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion
The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found.
Using sponges to wipe out cancer
Manzamine A, a natural product derived from certain groups of sponges, can block the growth of cervical cancer cells, report Medical University of South Carolina researchers, working with investigators and students at the University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and University of Malaya in Malaysia.
New study identifies characteristics of patients with fatal COVID-19
In a new study, researchers identified the most common characteristics of 85 COVID-19 patients who died in Wuhan, China in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic.
A combined optical transmitter and receiver
Researchers at Linköping University, together with colleagues in China, have developed a tiny unit that is both an optical transmitter and a receiver.
Study identifies new temperature sensing mechanism in plants
Cell biologists at the UC Riverside reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light.
Rapid infectious disease shifts in Chinese children and adolescents prior to COVID-19
Deaths of children and adolescents in China due to infectious diseases were becoming rare prior to the covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study.
New UTA study finds people tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies
A study conducted by two associate professors of marketing at The University of Texas at Arlington shows that people are more likely to base decisions on anecdotal information instead of facts when they feel anxious and vulnerable.
Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction
A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction.
Coronavirus Vaccine: Where are we and what's next? (video)
You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle.
Patients with Parkinson's disease face unique 'hidden sorrows' related to the COVID-19
While much attention has focused on the potential for severe respiratory complications and unfavorable outcomes from the COVID-19 pandemic among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the impact extends beyond these threats.
Clues to COVID-19 coronavirus's vulnerability emerge from an antibody against SARS
An antibody recovered from a survivor of the SARS epidemic in the early 2000s has revealed a potential vulnerability of the new coronavirus at the root of COVID-19, according to a study from scientists at Scripps Research.
Turning colon cancer cells around
Using a modified natural substance along with current approaches could improve colon cancer treatment, according to findings by University of California, Irvine biologists.
Changes to drylands with future climate change
While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study.
POssible coronavirus drug identified by Australian scientists
Australian Scientists have shown that an anti-parasitic drug already available around the world can kill the virus -- effectively eradicating all genetic material of the virus within 48 hours.
Understanding research on how people develop trust in AI can inform its use
A new review examined two decades of research on how people develop trust in AI.
Case study: Treating COVID-19 in a patient with multiple myeloma
A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers.
Extreme rainfall days in metropolitan São Paulo have risen four-fold in seven decades
Study by researchers at Brazil's National Disaster Surveillance and Early Warning Center (CEMADEN) also shows a rise in the number of consecutive dry days, suggesting that extreme rainfall events are concentrated in shorter, more widely spaced periods.
How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?
Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists at UC Davis.
Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia
A fossilised seal tooth, dating back approximately three million years, found on a Victorian beach proves earless seals existed in Australia in prehistoric times.
A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle.
Indigenous American ancestry may be associated with HER2-positive breast cancer
An increased proportion of Indigenous American (IA) ancestry was associated with a greater incidence of HER2-positive breast cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
New molecular mechanism that regulates the sentinel cells of the immune system
CNIC scientists have uncovered a new molecular mechanism that determines the identity and expansion of one of the cell types that work as immune sentinels in the body -- the macrophages of the serous cavities.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Harold develop near Solomon Islands
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of newly formed Tropical Cyclone Harold.
Unsustainable food systems: Can we reverse current trends?
As rural masses migrate to urban areas, populations grow, and people work toward better living standards, global food system sustainability pays a high price, according to a new scientific analysis spanning low- to high-income countries.
New laser technique will allow more powerful -- and smaller -- particle accelerators
Scientists at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics outline a method to shape intense laser light in a way that accelerates electrons to record energies in very short distances.
Dilemma of COVID-19, aging and cardiovascular disease
Whether individuals should continue to take angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the context of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is discussed in this article.
An antibiotic masquerading as a natural compound in the Giant Madeiran Squill
A previous study has shown that a type of squill growing in Madeira produces a chemical compound that may be useful as a medicinal drug.
Removing the novel coronavirus from the water cycle
Researchers at UC Riverside and the University of Salerno have called for more research to determine the best ways to keep SARS-CoV-19 out of the water cycle.
Suffering from skin damage from face masks?
DOCTORS and nurses on the COVID-19 frontline are spending many hours a day wearing face masks, and many members of the general public are doing the same.
Larger thighs associated with lower risk of heart disease in obesity
A larger thigh circumference may be associated with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease in people with obesity, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections.
A twist connecting magnetism and electronic-band topology
Materials that combine topological electronic properties and quantum magnetism are of high current interest, for the quantum many-body physics that can unfold in them and for possible applications in electronic components.
Passport to improved health for military veterans
A healthcare 'passport' to access NHS and other well-being services has been beneficial for the mental health of veterans and provides them with a sense of identity, according to research published in the BMJ Military Health.

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