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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 10, 2020


New protocol identifies fascinating quantum states
Topological materials attract great interest and may provide the basis for a new era in materials development.
What is the origin of water on Earth?
Led by Cédric Gillmann -- Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB, funded by the EoS project ET-HoME, a team of researchers demonstrate that the water we are now enjoying on Earth has been there since its formation.
Single-electron pumping in a ZnO single-nanobelt transistor
Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) have traditionally been employed to implement spin-based quantum computing and quantum information processing.
Development of new photovoltaic commercialization technology
A technology to further accelerate the commercialization of Colloidal Quantum Dot(CQD) Photovoltaic(PV) devices, which are expected to be next-generation photovoltaic devices, has been developed.
A model for better predicting the unpredictable byproducts of genetic modification
Researchers are interested in genetically modifying trees for a variety of applications, from biofuels to paper production.
Hair surface engineering to be advanced by nano vehicles
'Hair surface engineering: modification of fibrous materials of biological origin using functional ceramic nano containers', a project headed by Rawil Fakhrullin, is supported by the Russian Science Foundation.
Ion channel VRAC enhances immune response against viruses
VRAC/LRRC8 chloride channels do not only play a decisive role in the transport of cytostatics, amino acids and neurotransmitters.
Should infants be separated from COVID-19-positive mothers?
In a new commentary, Alison Stuebe, MD, President of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, addresses the risks and benefits of separating infants from COVID-19-positive mothers following birth.
Extra-tropical Cyclone Harold caught by NASA's Terra Satellite
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of extra-tropical cyclone Harold.
COVID-19 and the built environment
Social distancing has Americans mostly out of the places they usually gather and in their homes as we try to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
Video games improve the visual attention of expert players
Long-term experiences of action real-time strategy games leads to improvements in temporal visual selective attention.
AGA releases official guidance for patients with IBD during the COVID-19 pandemic
Today, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new COVID-19 guidance for gastroenterologists treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): AGA Clinical Practice Update on Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Expert Commentary.
Working together to combat mental health challenges during COVID-19 pandemic
This article offers lessons from Hubei, China, on potential methods to focus on mental health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
Suicide mortality and COVID-19
Reasons why U.S. suicide rates may rise in tandem with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are explained in this article that also describes opportunities to expand research and care.
USDA-ARS scientists find new tool to combat major wheat disease
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have discovered a gene that can be used to develop varieties of wheat that will be more resistant to a disease that is a major threat both overseas and to the nation's $10 billion annual wheat crop.
Discovery of a mechanism plants use to toggle on photosynthesis chosen by top journal
A research team led by a Washington State University professor has developed a new tool to study how lipids interact with proteins in plants to help understand how photosynthesis happens.
A novel Li-ion superconductor makes possible an era of safe battery
Dr. Hyoungchul Kim's research team, from the Center for Energy Materials Research at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST), have successfully developed a sulfide-based superionic conductor that can be used to a high-performance solid electrolyte in all-solid-state batteries.
COVID-19 response plan addresses unique challenges for rural hospitals and health systems
Surgeons at one rural health care system on both sides of the New York-Pennsylvania border have reported on their preparedness response plan for dealing with the COVID-19 surge.
Psychology research: Antivaxxers actually think differently than other people
As vaccine skepticism has become increasingly widespread, two researchers in the Texas Tech University Department of Psychological Sciences have suggested a possible explanation.
A new strategy to create 2D magnetic order
Scientists based in China discover the spin-valve magnetoresistance at the ferromagnetic SrRuO3 grain boundary owing to the nature of non-magnetic metallic grain boundary revealed by electron microscopy and first principles calculations, providing a new strategy to create the low-dimensional magnetic order via defect engineering.
UC San Diego researchers move closer to producing heparin in the lab
In a new study published in PNAS, UC San Diego researchers moved one step closer to the ability to make heparin in cultured cells.
New paper points out flaw in Rubber Hand Illusion raising tough questions for psychology
A world-famous psychological experiment used to help explain the brain's understanding of the body, as well as scores of clinical disorders, has been dismissed as not fit-for-purpose in a new academic paper from the University of Sussex.
Details of treatment for patients in China who died of COVID-19
This case series describes clinical characteristics of patients who died of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China.
Ants or plants? Evolutionary diversification factors of aphids
The plant-feeding insect aphids are thought to have diversified by shifting their host plants to other closely related plant species.
Magnet research takes giant leap
Researchers pushing the limits of magnets as a means to create faster electronics published their proof of concept findings today, April 10, in the journal Science.
Computer model predicts how drugs affect heart rhythm
UC Davis Health researchers have developed a computer model to screen drugs for unintended cardiac side effects, especially arrhythmia risk.
Caring for patients with cancer during the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy
An essay discusses the challenges associated with caring for patients with cancer during the COVID-19 epidemic in Italy.
Mental health consequences of COVID-19, physical distancing
The article emphasizes the importance of mitigating the mental health consequences of social distancing in the COVID-19 era.
Large majority of Washington state's heroin users want to reduce use
A new survey of people who inject illicit drugs in the state of Washington yields positive and important findings for policy makers as the world struggles to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Technique offers path for biomanufacturing medicines during space flights
Research published today in Nature Microgravity used an Earth-bound simulator of the space station instrument to grow E. coli, demonstrating that it can be nurtured with methods that promise to be more suitable for space travel than existing alternatives.
Light driven proton pump in distant relative
Researchers investigated the group of microorganisms classified as Asgard archaea, and found a protein in their membrane which acts as a miniature light-activated pump.
Neurologic manifestations of hospitalized patients with COVID-19
This study investigates the neurologic symptoms of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China.
Self-powered X-ray detector to revolutionize imaging for medicine, security and research
2D perovskite thin films boost sensitivity 100-fold compared to conventional detectors, require no outside power source, and enable low-dose dental and medical images.
Belgian scientists identify ATP10B as novel risk gene for Parkinson's disease
Screening DNA of Parkinson's patients in the Christine Van Broeckhoven laboratory (VIB-UAntwerpen Center for Molecular Neurology) identified a new risk gene for Parkinson's disease.
A remote military medical team can offer insights to US hospitals preparing for COVID-19
The lessons learned by a small military surgical team who had to transition into a pandemic response team during the COVID-19 pandemic can offer insights for medical centers around the US that are adapting in a rapidly changing environment.
PARP inhibitor drugs can be 'tuned' for better killing of tumor cells
A prospective 'PARP inhibitor' drug that has struggled to show effectiveness in clinical trials against cancers can be structurally modified to greatly increase its power to kill tumor cells, researchers from Penn Medicine report this week in Science.

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