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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 11, 2020


Reducing sulfur dioxide emissions alone cannot substantially decrease air pollution
Due to the reduced emissions of SO2, and considering the high level of NH3 emissions in China, nitrogen dioxide emissions control is more effective in reducing the surface PM2.5 concentration in China.
Skoltech researchers find a new HIT defense bacteria use against antibiotics
Scientists at the Severinov Laboratory in Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have uncovered a new mechanism of bacterial self-defense against microcin C, a potent antibiotic weapon in the microscopic world that can sometimes turn on its master.
Observing the atmosphere at high altitudes using unmanned aeria vehicles
Unmanned aerial vehicles sounding data can improve Antarctic weather forecasting to a certain extent, especially the prediction of temperature, wind speed, and humidity.
COVID-19: Cedars-Sinai physician co-authors analysis of antiviral drug
In a small group of patients hospitalized with severe complications of COVID-19 and treated with the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir, clinical improvement was observed in 68% of patients treated, according to an analysis co-authored by Jonathan Grein, MD, director of Hospital Epidemiology at Cedars-Sinai.
Simple method for ceramic-based flexible electrolyte sheets for lithium metal batteries
Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a new method to make ceramic-based flexible electrolyte sheets for lithium metal batteries.

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