Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 16, 2020


Eco-friendly Oxy-CFBC technology to implement stackless power plant
Coal-fired power plants in Korea have been considered as one of the main sources of air pollutants, CO2 and the other precursor materials to ultra fine dusts such as nitrogen oxide, sulfur oxide.
Study shows European coins have antimicrobial activity in contrast to banknotes
Research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that European banknotes are more easily contaminated by microbes than coins.
Parasite carried by grey squirrels negatively impacts red squirrel behavior
Research published in the Journal of Animal Ecology reveals a new mechanism of how grey squirrels affect native red squirrels in Europe through parasite-mediated competition.
New universal Ebola vaccine may fight all four virus species that infect humans
Infectious disease scientists report early development of a potential universal vaccine for Ebola viruses that preclinical tests show might neutralize all four species of these deadly viruses infecting people in recent outbreaks, mainly in Africa.
New York nightlife venues recruited in effort to prevent overdoses due to fentanyl
Bars and nightclubs are a promising site for efforts to increase awareness of the risk of opioid overdose due to fentanyl-laced cocaine, suggests a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (JPHMP).
Psychedelic compound from magic mushrooms produced in yeast
Scientists from DTU Biosustain prove that psilocybin, a potential drug for treating depression and other psychological conditions can be produced in yeast.
Researchers discover treatment for spasticity in mice, following spinal cord injuries
In experiments with mice, researchers have studied neuronal mechanisms and found a way to by and large prevent spasticity from developing after spinal cord injuries.
Study finds evidence for existence of elusive 'metabolon'
For more than 40 years, scientists have hypothesized the existence of enzyme clusters, or 'metabolons,' in facilitating various processes within cells.
Mystery solved, rotavirus VP3 is a unique capping machine
After eluding researchers for more than 30 years, the VP3 protein of rotavirus has finally revealed its unique structure and function to a team led by scientists at Baylor College of Medicine.
Scents regulate fat storage without affecting eating behavior
Researchers discovered that, in the lab worm C. elegans, certain scents dynamically regulate fat mobilization by interacting with specific olfactory neurons through specific receptors.
Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees
New research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology finds that ash dieback is far less severe in the isolated conditions ash is often found in, such as forests with low ash density or in open canopies like hedges, suggesting the long term impact of the disease on Europe's ash trees will be more limited than previously thought.
Odor experts uncover the smelly chemistry of lemur love
Three chemicals with floral, fruity scents are likely essential ingredients in the natural cologne male ring-tailed lemurs use to attract a mate.
Biorobotics is the future of fish farming
Several hundred thousand salmon swim closely together in fish farms.
Small study shows paper towels much more effective at removing viruses than hand dryers
Research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that using paper towels is substantially more effective than jet dryers for removing microbes when still contaminated hands are dried.
Study reveals importance of mitochondrial small proteins in energy production
A small mitochondrial protein is necessary for energy production and its malfunction could be behind a range of degenerative diseases, according to study by Duke-NUS Medical School and their collaborators.
Marshall School of Medicine team explores surgery technology resulting in fewer incisions
Through the use of a newly developed needle arthroscope, incisionless and single-incision surgical procedures are possible for repairing certain types of knee and shoulder injuries suggests a series of Marshall University studies published in Arthroscopy Techniques, a companion to Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery.
Molecular networks serve as cellular blueprints
Networks are at the heart of everything from communications systems to pandemics.
New nanocarrier drug delivery technology crosses the blood-brain barrier
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes it more difficult for substances to be delivered from the blood to the brain compared to peripheral organs.
SMART and MIT develop nanosensors for real-time plant health monitoring
MIT, SMART and TLL researchers have developed a way to study and track the internal communication of living plants using carbon nanotube sensors that can be embedded in plant leaves.
Mentoring programs help female economists secure tenure-track positions
Research from Princeton University shows that an annual AEA workshop for female economists was effective in retaining women in academia and helping them to achieve tenure in the top 30 to 50 ranked schools in the country.
Scientists develop high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries
Recently, research groups led by Prof. LIU Jian and Prof.
In search of the Z boson
At the Japanese High-energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, in Tsukuba, about 50 kilometers north of Tokyo, the Belle II experiment has been in operation for about one year now.
Study estimates revenue produced by top college football players
The most elite players in college football increase revenue for their school football programs by an average of $650,000 a year, a first-of-its-kind study suggests.
Some worms programmed to die early for sake of colony
Some worms are genetically predisposed to die before reaching old age, which appears to benefit the colony by reducing food demand, finds a new UCL-led study published in Aging Cell.
High-efficiency catalyst enhancing the electric reduction performance of CO2
It provides new ideas for the design of the catalyst nanostructures boosting an efficient reaction.
A non-invasive way of monitoring diabetes
Saliva could be used instead of blood to monitor diabetes in a method proposed in research involving the University of Strathclyde.
New clues to predict the risks astronauts will face from space radiation on long missions
A team led by researchers at Colorado State University used a novel approach to test assumptions in a model used by NASA to predict health risks for astronauts.
NASA reports Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion hit record low in March
Ozone levels above the Arctic reached a record low for March, NASA researchers report.
Landmark 30-year study on Crigler-Najjar syndrome underscores the need for new therapies
A new study summarizes more than 30 years of clinical experience and describes the clinical course of 28 individuals homozygous for damaging mutations in the UGT1A1 gene who were born between 1984 and 2015 with Crigler-Najjar syndrome.
New guidance for the assessment of Fracture Liaison Services at a patient outcome level
The IOF Capture the Fracture® Working Group in collaboration with the FFN Secondary Fragility Fracture Special Interest Group and NOF has developed a patient-level Key Performance Indicator (KPI) set for Fracture Liaison Services (FLSs).
Caring for those most vulnerable to COVID-19 requires vigilance
Early reports suggest the case fatality rate for those over 80, which constitutes nearly half of nursing home residents, is more than 15 percent.
Study: Cultural variables play important role in perceptions of status, power
Cultural variables play an important role in perceptions of status and power in business, according to research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F.
Call for palliative care to be adapted for severely ill Covid-19 patients
Emergency-style palliative care needs to implemented to meet the needs of Covid-19 patients who wouldn't benefit from a ventilator say researchers.
Influenza: researchers show that new treatment reduces spread of virus
Researchers have shown that a new antiviral drug for influenza can treat the infection at the same time as reducing the risk of transmission to others, offering powerful potential to change the way we manage influenza outbreaks -- particularly in vulnerable groups.
Harris Poll: Most Americans want government intervention to reduce inequality
A new poll finds most Americans say the federal government should reduce inequality, amid the Covid-19-produced economic crisis.
International consortium investigates overactive immune cells as cause of COVID-19 deaths
In the urgent battle to treat COVID-19 patients, a group of eleven international medical research organizations is investigating whether overactive immune cells that produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) cause the most severe cases.
3D printing and moon dust: an astronaut's kit for future space exploration?
One of the major challenges related to space exploration is the development of production technologies capable of exploiting the few resources available in extra-terrestrial environment.
Support plan boosts confidence of military spouses
A support program that aims to boost retention in the Armed Forces has received a positive research evaluation from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), with military personnel reporting increased confidence in their employment prospects and increased goodwill towards the Armed Forces.
Moiré engineering applicable in correlated oxides by USTC researchers
It provides a potential and brand-new route to achieving spatially patterned electronic textures on demand in strained epitaxial materials.
Climate-driven megadrought is emerging in western US, says study
A new study says a megadrought worse than anything known from recorded history is very likely in progress in the western United States and northern Mexico, and warming climate is playing a key role.
Trust in humans and robots: Economically similar but emotionally different
In research published in the Journal of Economic Psychology, scientists explore whether people trust robots as they do fellow humans.
UMD researchers find that incentive-based tariffs aren't the way to control invasive pests
While incentive-based programs have had many success stories in helping to regulate air quality, control pollution, and protect wildlife and fisheries, they may not be the answer to controlling invasive pests.
Researchers get important glimpse into microbiome development in early life
A team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has characterized how the gut microbiome develops in the first hours of infancy, providing a critical baseline for how changes in this environment can impact health and disease later in life.
CHEOPS space telescope ready for scientific operation
CHEOPS has reached its next milestone: Following extensive tests in Earth's orbit, some of which the mission team was forced to carry out from home due to the coronavirus crisis, the space telescope has been declared ready for science.
SCAI issues recommendations on adult congenital cardiac interventional training
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released a position statement on adult congenital cardiac interventional training, competencies and organizational recommendations.
WHO-recommended disinfectants are effective against novel coronavirus
When used correctly, both alcohol-based hand disinfectants recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) are effective against the novel coronavirus Sars-Cov-2, as confirmed by an international research team headed by Professor Stephanie Pfänder from the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB).
US adults are most concerned about experiencing increased anxiety as a result of COVID-19
A University of Phoenix survey gauged US adults' mental health as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and revealed that 4 in 10 are lonelier now than ever before.
ESO telescope sees star dance around supermassive black hole, proves Einstein right
Observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed for the first time that a star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way moves just as predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity.
Flatter graphene, faster electrons
Scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Department of Physics at the University of Basel developed a technique to flatten corrugations in graphene layers.
Neural circuits mapped: Now we understand vision better
Researchers from Aarhus University have discovered the function of a special group of nerve cells which are found in the eye and which sense visual movement.
Earth Day alert to save our frogs
With climate action a theme of Earth Day 2020 (April 22, 2020), a new research paper highlights the plight of some of the most at-risk amphibian species - and shortfalls in most conservation efforts.
Healthy climate news: Fava beans could replace soy
The end of soy as a protein substitute? Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found a way to make protein powder using fava beans -- a far more climate-friendly alternative.
Single cell division error may be responsible for complexity in cancer genomes
A single error in cell division related to the formation of a chromosome bridge can trigger a cascade of mutational events, rapidly generating many of the defining features of cancer genomes, a new study suggests.
Neuronal and neurotransmitter systems dynamic coupling explains the effects of psilocybin
Interest in research into the effects of psilocybin, a psychedelic drug, has increased significantly in recent years due to its promising therapeutic effects in neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and addiction.
JUUL sales bounced back within weeks of self-imposed flavor ban
A new study finds JUUL sales recovered within weeks following a dip after the company withdrew some flavored products from stores, eventually surpassing sales from before the change as consumption shifted to the menthol/mint and tobacco flavors that remained on shelves.
COVID-19 -- Impact of containment measures in Italy: 200,000 hospitalizations avoided in March
Since the beginning of the epidemic until March 25, the mobility restrictions implemented by the Italian government have avoided at least 200,000 hospitalizations and reduced the contagion transmission by 45% according to a study accepted for publication in the renowned journal PNAS, coauthored by a group of Italian scientists belonging to Politecnico di Milano, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, University of Zurich, EPFL Lausanne, and Università di Padova.
Novel sperm membrane protein FIMP facilitates mammalian fertilization
Researchers from Osaka University have identified a new sperm membrane protein that facilitates the complex sperm-oocyte fusion that is fundamental to sexual reproduction, naming it Fertilization Influencing Membrane Protein (FIMP).
Comparing smartphone-enabled blood pressure monitoring with regular care after heart attack
This randomized clinical trial compared blood pressure control after a heart attack among 200 patients who received either regular follow-up care of four visits to an outpatient clinic or who were given four smartphone-compatible devices (weight scale, blood pressure monitor, heart rhythm monitor and step counter) and had two care visits via a video connection and two outpatient clinic visits.
Scientific machine learning paves way for rapid rocket engine design
Researchers from the Oden Institute are developing a faster modeling technique for rocket engine designers to test performance in different conditions.
Caring for cancer patients in the COVID-19 era
In Nature Medicine, the seven comprehensive cancer centres of Cancer Core Europe (CCE), including the Netherlands Cancer Institute and Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre, have shared how they rapidly reorganised their oncological healthcare systems during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Insight into the synapses
'Distance keeping' is not exactly the motto of the glutamate receptors: Using super-resolution microscopy, it now was discovered that the receptors usually appear in small groups at the synapses and are in contact with other proteins.
Seeing 'under the hood' in batteries
A high-sensitivity X-ray technique at Berkeley Lab is attracting a growing group of scientists because it provides a deep, precise dive into battery chemistry.
Review assesses stem cell therapy potential for treating preeclampsia
A review of using stem cells to treat preeclampsia, a dangerous condition in pregnancy, indicates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), or their secreted vesicles, have the potential to be used as therapies that could progress to clinical trials.
Children's fruit drinks need clearer labels, finds NYU study
The labels of drinks marketed to kids do not help parents and other consumers differentiate among fruit juice and sugar-laden, artificially flavored drinks, finds research from NYU School of Global Public Health.
3D fusion imaging improves coronary artery disease diagnosis
A new technique that combines CT and MRI can bolster coronary artery disease diagnosis and help to define appropriate treatment for patients suffering from the disease, according to a new study.
New highly porous materials for safe, low-pressure storage of methane and hydrogen
A new aluminum-based metal-organic framework material achieves both high gravimetric and volumetric uptake and delivery of methane and hydrogen, researchers report.
Meeting multiple management goals to maximize coral reef health
While management strategies can be effective at achieving reef fisheries' conservation goals, a new study reveals how increased human pressure makes conservation of coral reef biodiversity truly difficult to achieve.
AJR review of COVID-19 studies cautions against chest CT for coronavirus diagnosis
To date, the radiology literature on coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia has consisted of limited retrospective studies that do not substantiate the use of CT as a diagnostic test for COVID-19, according to an open-access article in the American Journal of Roentgenology.
Visual impairment among women and dementia risk
Whether visual impairment is a risk factor for dementia was the focus of this observational study that included 1,000 older women who are participants in the Women's Health Initiative studies.
Critical 'starbleed' vulnerability in FPGA chips identified
Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are flexibly programmable computer chips that are considered very secure components in many applications.
New electrode material developed to increase charge capacity of lithium batteries
Lithium batteries hold a lot of promise for the future of many applications, including electric vehicles, but tend to be prohibitively expensive, according to a team led by Naoaki Yabuuchi, professor at Yokohama National University in Japan.
Designing peptide inhibitors for possible COVID-19 treatments
Scientists across the globe are rushing to find inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus behind the COVID-19 pandemic.
Clemson scientist explores the colorful intricacies of pollen
A collaborative study by Clemson scientist Matthew Koski suggests that pollen color can evolve independently from flower traits, and that plant species maintain both light and dark pollen because each offers distinct survival advantages.
Innovating the peer-review research process
A team of scientists led by a Michigan State University astronomer has found that a new process of evaluating proposed scientific research projects is as effective -- if not more so -- than the traditional peer-review method.
Soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization after the initial flush of CO2
Healthy soil should have abundant nitrogen to supply plant growth needs, but it should not all be in the inorganic fraction.
Climate change: Extreme coastal flooding events in the US expected to rise
Extreme flooding events in some US coastal areas could double every five years if sea levels continue to rise as expected, a study published in Scientific Reports suggests.
Blood test may help doctors catch pancreatic cancer early
A blood test may be able to detect the most common form of pancreatic cancer while it is still in its early stages while also helping doctors accurately stage a patient's disease and guide them to the appropriate treatment.
Scientists make step towards understanding the universe
Physicists from the University of Sheffield have taken a step towards understanding why the universe is made of mostly matter and not antimatter, by studying the difference between the two.
Male ring-tail lemurs exude fruity-smelling perfume from their wrists to attract mates
Humans aren't the only primates who like smelling nice for their dates.
Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika.
Researchers use genomics to estimate Samoan population dynamics over 3,000 years
A new study estimating the size of the Samoan population using contemporary genomic data found that the founding population remained low for the first 1,500 years of human settlement, contributing to understanding the evolutionary context of the recent rise in obesity and related diseases.
Single-atom-layer trap: A pivotal microscopic feature for li-ion migration
The newly reported type of non-periodic feature forbids Li-ion migration in a solid electrolyte.
Gas storage method could help next-generation clean energy vehicles
A Northwestern University research team has designed and synthesized new materials with ultrahigh porosity and surface area for the storage of hydrogen and methane for fuel cell-powered vehicles.
How tiny water droplets form can have a big impact on climate models
Droplets and bubbles are formed nearly everywhere, from boiling our morning coffee, to complex industrial processes and even volcanic eruptions.
Untwisting plastics for charging internet-of-things devices
Scientists are unraveling the properties of electricity-conducting plastics so they can be used in future energy-harvesting devices.
Breastfeeding benefits during COVID-19
While the current coronavirus pandemic continues to affect all people, families will still give birth and bring new life into the world.
How many children is enough?
Most Russians would like to have two children: a boy and a girl.
Drug overcomes chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
In an international preclinical study, researchers found they could overcome chemotherapy resistance in clear cell ovarian cancer cell models using low doses of the drug 2-deoxy-D-glucose.
Guide for COVID-19 remote consultation by primary carers designed by NTU Singapore scientist & peers
Primary care health workers now have a guide for conducting remote consultation of suspected COVID-19 patients, developed by a team of researchers from Singapore and the UK.
Indoor precautions essential to stem airborne COVID-19
The time research aerosolisation of virus droplets and airborne transmission is now.
Better data framework needed to improve rare disease diagnostic rates
A better framework for the reanalysis of genetic data, a game-changing process which could improve diagnostic rates by up to 32 per cent, was needed, a new study has found.
Special issue: Drought's impacts on society, ecology and agriculture
In this Special Issue of Science, five Reviews highlight new insights into the impacts of drought on social, ecological and agricultural systems worldwide.
Researchers find significant economic losses due to soybean diseases
Economic losses due to soybean diseases in the United States from 1996 to 2016 amounted to more than $95 billion, according to a team of researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences who examined the long-term impact of soybean diseases on production in the U.S.
Solving the puzzle of Mitchell disease
Researchers discovered that ACOX1 is involved in two distinct neurodegenerative disorders.
Pushing the limits of 2D supramolecules
Researchers at the University of South Florida have reached a 'world record' in the development of two-dimensional supramolecules.
How exercise supports your mental fitness: Current recommendations
Sporting activities can bring about a long-term improvement in cognitive performance across all age groups.
Proteins may halt the severe cytokine storms seen in COVID-19 patients
A team of MIT researchers has developed specialized antibody-like receptor proteins that they believe could soak up the excess cytokines produced during a cytokine storm.
How did an ancient plant from Latin America become Asia's second-most-important cash crop?
In recent decades, cassava yields in Asia have increased dramatically and industry is growing bitter varieties for starch, biofuels and a variety of other ingredients.
Skoltech and MIPT scientists find a rule to predict new superconducting metal hydrides
The search for coveted high-temperature superconductors is going to get easier with a new 'law within a law' discovered by Skoltech and MIPT researchers and their colleagues, who figured out a link between an element's position in the Periodic Table and its potential to form a high-temperature superconducting hydride.
New 'toolbox' for urological cancer detection
Researchers from Ghent University, Belgium, together with researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a new method for biomarker discovery of urological cancers.
Would-be purchasers of firearms in Baltimore's underground gun market face obstacles
A small survey conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that more than half of respondents who reported having attempted to acquire a firearm in Baltimore's underground firearm market in the prior six months were unsuccessful -- some due to lack of financial means, and others reporting they had no trusted point of contact for acquiring guns through unlawful means.
NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto's displaced rainfall
NASA analyzed weakening Tropical Storm Jeruto's rainfall and found one small area of moderate rainfall displaced from the center, because of strong wind shear.
New photon-counting camera captures 3D images with record speed and resolution
Researchers have developed the first megapixel photon-counting camera based on new-generation image sensor technology that uses single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs).
Meeting care needs of older adults isolated at home during COVID-19 pandemic
The importance of recognizing and directly addressing the challenges created by COVID-19 era physical distancing in the care of older adults is addressed.
Returning land to nature with high-yield farming
The expansion of farmlands to meet the growing food demand of the world's ever expanding population places a heavy burden on natural ecosystems.
Can coral reefs 'have it all'?
A new study outlines how strategic placement of no-fishing marine reserves can help coral reef fish communities thrive.
Researchers propose theoretical model to describe capillary force balance at contact line
It provided a theoretical insight into capillary forces at the contact line and validated Young's equation based on a mechanical interpretation.
Whole genome sequencing reveals genetic structural secrets of schizophrenia
UNC School of Medicine scientists have conducted the largest-ever whole genome sequencing study of schizophrenia to provide a more complete picture of the role the human genome plays in this disease.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.