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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 21, 2020


Reference genes are identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
University of Cordoba Professor Miguel Aguilar participated in a published article on reference genes in the study of wheat meiosis, the process in which reproductive cells are generated
What helps couples weather financial storms
In financially challenging times, it's especially important to show your partner love and support, says researcher Ashley LeBaron, who studied what contributes to couples' success in financially stressful times.
Novel computational methods provide new insight into daytime alertness in people with sleep apnoea
New polysomnography parameters are better than conventional ones at describing how the severity of oxygen desaturation during sleep affects daytime alertness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, according to a new study published in European Respiratory Journal.
A biological mechanism for depression
Researchers report that in depressed individuals there are increased amounts of an unmodified structural protein, called tubulin, in lipid rafts compared with non-depressed individuals.
NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression.
How the brain recognizes change
IBS research team revealed in an animal study a previously unknown role of a presynaptic adhesion molecule to tell the new change by regulating postsynaptic NMDA-type receptor responses at excitatory synapses.
Organic memory devices show promise for flexible, wearable, personalized computing
The advent of artificial intelligence, machine learning and the internet of things is expected to change modern electronics.
Researchers uncover mechanisms of protective antibody response during Marburg infection
A detailed study of the monoclonal antibodies from a person who survived a Marburg infection led researchers to identify novel mechanisms that contribute protection against the disease, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
Study shows glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
A new study led by the University of Bristol has shown a common eye condition, glaucoma, could be successfully treated with a single injection using gene therapy, which would improve treatment options, effectiveness and quality of life for many patients.
How the blob came back
Weakened wind patterns likely spurred the wave of extreme ocean heat that swept the North Pacific last summer, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.
Tele-diabetes to manage new-onset diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
Two new case studies highlight the use of tele-diabetes to manage new-onset type 1 diabetes in an adult and an infant during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Computer scientists create a 'laboratory' to improve streaming video
The quality of internet TV depends on algorithms that minimize glitches and stalls.
Study sheds light on unique culinary traditions of prehistoric hunter-gatherers
A new study suggests the culinary tastes of ancient people were not solely dictated by the foods available in a particular area, but also influenced by the traditions and habits of cultural groups.
SCAI, ACC, and ACEP release consensus on managing AMI patients during COVID-19
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) have released a consensus statement that provides recommendations for a systematic approach for the care of patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern.
Children face three times more air pollution during the school run
Children face a worrying threefold increase in air pollution during the daily school runs, causing air quality experts to call for restrictions on the use of cars during those periods.
Humble bug holds key to relieving millions of allergy sufferers in Europe
Dr. Urs Schaffner, lead author of study in Nature Communications, says the leaf beetle Ophraella communa can significantly reduce pollen -- which causes a range of symptoms from sneezing to itchy eyes and aggravates conditions such as asthma and eczema -- from common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).
Chiral crystals blowing off polarized spins: Phenomena detected without magnets
Scientists have discovered that a chiral crystal, which exhibits no magnetism, works as a polarizer of electron spins when the charge current is applied at room temperature in the absence of magnetic field.
Expansion of world's cities creating 'new ecological niches' for infectious diseases
New research highlights how urban expansion is creating the conditions for infectious diseases to emerge and spread around the world by blurring the classical boundaries between city, suburb, and countryside.
Human papillomavirus confers radiosensitivity in oropharyngeal cancer cells
The cover for issue 16 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'Radiation-induced DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX foci formation at a specified time point after 10 Gy irradiation,' by Zhang, et al.
UK coronavirus policy places people aged 60-69 at increased risk
The 7.3 million people in the UK aged between 60 and 69 are at increased risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19.
Printed to find a cure
Would you like to be able to find out which antibiotic combination works best for a particular patient?
LGBTQ military service members at higher risk of sexual harassment, assault, stalking
A recent study found that LGBTQ service members face an elevated risk of sexual victimization including harassment, assault and stalking while in the military than their non-LGBTQ counterparts.
Pulse oximetry monitoring overused in infants with bronchiolitis
Monitoring blood oxygen levels with continuous pulse oximetry is being overused in infants with bronchiolitis who do not require supplemental oxygen, according to a study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
Engineers develop way to improve efficiency and heat tolerance of devices
When it comes to increasing electric storage efficiency and electric breakdown strength -- the ability of an electrical system to operate at higher voltage and temperatures with great efficiency -- increasing one traditionally has led to a decrease in the other.
Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research.
Tetracycline-family antibiotics may offer early diagnostic for degenerative eye disease
Utilizing human cadaver retinas containing drusen, the researchers used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to measure the light emission from tetracycline staining within those ocular mineral deposits.
Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment.
Scientists uncover major cause of resistance in solid electrolytes
Scientists investigated grain boundaries in a solid electrolyte at an unprecedentedly small scale.
HudsonAlpha plant genomics researchers surprised by cotton genome
Plant genomics researchers at HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology announce the surprising results of a cotton sequencing study led by Jane Grimwood, Ph.D., and Jeremy Schmutz, who co-direct the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC).
Nearly half of US breathing unhealthy air; record-breaking air pollution in nine cities
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of air pollution on lung health is of heightened concern.
Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition.
Developing human corneal tissue
Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel method to produce corneal sheets from human induced pluripotent stem cells.
New hybrid material improves the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new hybrid material of mesoporous silicon microparticles and carbon nanotubes that can improve the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries.
Present-day dogs defy the domestication syndrome
Does the domestication syndrome exist? New research reveals that this does not seem to be the case in present-day dogs.
New algorithm to help process biological images
Skoltech researchers have presented a new biological image processing method that accurately picks out specific biological objects in complex images.
The best things come in small packages
A low-cost miniaturized carbon dioxide monitoring instrument has been developed.
AI may help brain cancer patients avoid biopsy
Brain cancer patients in the coming years may not need to go under the knife to help doctors determine the best treatment for their tumors.
How SARS-CoV-2 gets into respiratory tissue -- and how it may exploit one of our defenses
What makes SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, such a threat?
Spanish scientists identify a biomarker that detects atherosclerosis before the appearance of symptoms
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria-Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD) in Madrid have demonstrated that a proteins present in early atheroma plaques -- accumulations of cholesterol in the wall of arteries -- could be used as a biomarker to detect atherosclerosis in the subclinical phase, before the appearance of symptoms.
International team develops new model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
A new international study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, applied a novel statistical method that -- for the first time -- captures the important interactions between tides and storm surges.
Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of telehealth-delivered behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome.
Ultrasound-assisted molecule delivery looks to preserve blood for years
Blood can typically be stored for only six weeks after donation, but a potential solution attempts to dry blood by using a sugar-based preservative.
Media literacy can improve child nutrition, family relationships
A new study shows that building critical media skills as a family can have a positive impact on kids' nutrition without restricting their access to TV and computers.
Researchers develop new microneedle array combination vaccine delivery system
In parallel to their current work on a potential coronavirus vaccine, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a new vaccine delivery system for vaccines using live or attenuated viral vectors: a finger-tip sized patch that contains 400 tiny needles, each just half of one millimeter.
High-quality boron nitride grown at atmospheric pressure
Graphene Flagship researchers reported a significant step forward in growing monoisotopic hexagonal boron nitride at atmospheric pressure for the production of large and very high-quality crystals.
Establish contingency plans to meet COVID-19 surge in urban areas
In 'Mobilization and Preparation of a Large Urban Academic Center During the COVID-19 Pandemic,'- published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society - experts from Philadelphia's Temple University Hospital share their contingency plans for meeting an increased demand for hospitalization, as well as their protocols and training plans to minimize health care staff exposure to COVID-19 and ensure proper active and reserve staffing.
Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
An international team of scientists have found an easy way to trigger an unusual state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate.
Social isolation linked to higher risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease in older adults
Social isolation is linked to a heightened risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease among older adults, suggests research published online in the journal Thorax.
A new biosensor for the COVID-19 virus
A team of researchers from Empa, ETH Zurich and Zurich University Hospital has succeeded in developing a novel sensor for detecting the new coronavirus.
New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents.
New POP atomic clock design achieves state-of-the-art frequency stability
Chinese researchers led by DENG Jianliao from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) have developed a pulsed optically pumped (POP) atomic clock with a frequency stability of 10-15 at 104 seconds based on a new design.
New study shows sharp decrease of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua
The percentage of women and girls in Nicaragua's second-largest city who reported experiencing physical violence by their partners during their lifetimes decreased from 55% in 1995 to 28% in 2016, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Global Health.
Scientists explore using 'own' immune cells to target infectious diseases including COVID-19
The engineering of specific virus-targeting receptors onto a patient's own immune cells is now being explored by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, as a potential therapy for controlling infectious diseases, including the COVID-19-causing virus, SARS-CoV-2.
Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats
An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread
Terahertz science discloses the ultrafast photocarrier dynamics in carbon nanotubes
A team of researchers at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, in collaboration with TU Wien, Nanyang Technological University, Rice University, University of Alberta and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, comes closer to unraveling how quasiparticles in carbon nanotubes behave under a strong electric field.
How Tweets may influence substance abuse in youth
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), researchers characterized the content of 23 million drug-related tweets by youths to identify their beliefs and behaviors related to drug use and better understand the potential mechanisms driving substance use behavior.
New macrolactone database could aid drug discovery, research
Researchers have created a free-to-use database of 14,000 known macrolactones -- large molecules used in drug development -- which contains information about the molecular characteristics, chemical diversity and biological activities of this structural class.
High-performance electrolyte solves battery puzzle
Lithium ion batteries have already become an integral part of our everyday life.
CRISPR helps identify potential Alzheimer's-related protein
Experts at the University of Tokyo have identified a new protein in the pathway that leads to Alzheimer's disease.
How cancer cells don their invisibility cloaks
Immunotherapy drugs that target a protein called programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on the surface of cancer cells have quickly become a mainstay to treat many forms of cancer, often with dramatic results.
Easing the burden of coronavirus with virtual reality
A new article discusses the psychological stresses imposed by the coronavirus pandemic and suggests that virtual reality can help alleviate the psychological impact of the need for social isolation.
Novel class of specific RNAs may explain increased depression susceptibility in females
Researchers at Mount Sinai have found that a novel class of genes known as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) expressed in the brain may play a pivotal role in regulating mood and driving sex-specific susceptibility versus resilience to depression.
Modelling wrinkling and buckling in materials that form the basis of flexible electronics
A new paper authored by John F. Niven, Department of Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, published in EPJ E, aims to understand how materials used in flexible electronics behave under stress and strain, particularly, how they wrinkle and buckle.
Yale-NUS College scientists find bisulphates that curb efficacy of diesel engine catalysts
A team of researchers from Yale-NUS College, in collaboration with scientists in Sweden, has found that bisulphate species in the exhaust stream are strongly connected to decreasing the effectiveness of exhaust remediation catalysts in diesel engines.
Researchers identify link between obesity and sleep loss in worms
Can staying up late make you fat? Researchers found the opposite to be true when they studied sleep in worms: It's not the sleep loss that leads to obesity, but rather that excess weight can cause poor sleep.
Small rises in blood glucose trigger big changes in insulin-producing cells
This study provides a wealth of new data showing how beta cells behave at slightly raised levels of blood glucose -- still within the pre-diabetes range.
Coffee changes our sense of taste
Sweet food is even sweeter when you drink coffee. This is shown by the result of research from Aarhus University.
Study identifies potential drug treatments for telomere diseases
Capping decades of research, a study in Cell Stem Cell may offer a breakthrough in treating dyskeratosis congenita and other so-called telomere diseases, in which cells age prematurely.
Keep children from hospital during crisis
With stressed hospital services, and concerns about the spread of COVID-19, experts are reminding carers of children and young people of the importance of safely adhering to their supported chronic condition self-management plans from the safety of their home.
Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' -- a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors -- that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals.
How do our cells respond to stress?
Molecular biologists reverse-engineer a complex cellular structure that is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS
Penn Engineering's new scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels.
ASU scientists lead study of galaxy's 'water worlds'
In seeking to learn more about Neptune-like exoplanets, an international team of researchers, led by Arizona State University, has provided one of the first mineralogy lab studies for water-rich exoplanets.
Penn Engineers' 'nanocardboard' flyers could serve as martian atmospheric probes
Penn Engineers are suggesting a new way to explore the sky: tiny aircraft that weigh about as much as a fruit fly and have no moving parts.
TGF-β-driven reduction of CYGB is associated with oxidative DNA damage of HSCs in NASH
This study shows that the molecular regulatory mechanism of TGF-β-induced downregulation of CYGB expression in human HSCs, leading to the loss of cellular tolerance to exogenous oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in activated HSCs in human NASH with advanced fibrosis.
Scientists identify cause of leakiness in eye diseases
Scientists have identified a key step in the process that leads to leaky vessels and harmful swelling in eye diseases, according to a new study published today in eLife.
UB researchers create a low-cost ventilator for areas with limited means
Researchers from the Biophysics and Bioengineering Unit of the University of Barcelona have created a non-invasive low-cost ventilator, to support patients with respiratory diseases in areas with limited means.
Advancing high temperature electrolysis: Splitting water to store energy as hydrogen
Recently, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory developed a new electrode material for an electrochemical cell that can efficiently convert excess electricity and water into hydrogen.
AI to make dentists' work easier
Finnish researchers have developed a new automatized way to localise mandibular canals.
New insight into how a genetic change increases the risk of schizophrenia
A genetic change increases the risk of developing schizophrenia and highlights new opportunities for drug treatment say researchers.
Study finds Tai-Chi-based mindfulness training reduced core ADHD symptoms in children
In a recent study published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, Stewart H.
North pole will be ice-free in summer
Summer Arctic sea-ice is predicted to disappear before 2050, resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem.
Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers from Graz, Austria, are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear.
Comprehensive tumour immunity map opens up immunotherapy to more patients
Scientists have developed a new way to map the molecules on tumour cells that flag their presence to the immune system, according to a study published today in eLife.
New research reveals heavy cost of excessive drinking on people's decision making
A new study highlights how hangover inhibits individuals' 'core executive functions' with knock-on impacts for those currently working from home.
Lizards develop new 'love language'
Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards relocated to experimental islets in Greece produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from biologists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St.
Welcome to the House of Slytherin: Salazar's pit viper, a new green pit viper from India
During an expedition to Arunachal Pradesh in India, part of the Himalayan biodiversity hotspot, a new species of green pit viper Trimeresurus salazar with unique stripes and colouration patterns was discovered near Pakke Tiger Reserve.
Nutrient deficiency in tumor cells attracts cells that suppress the immune system
A study led by IDIBELL researchers and published this week in the American journal PNAS shows that, by depriving tumor cells of glucose, they release a large number of signaling molecules.
Scientists shed new light on viral protein shell assembly
New insight on the conditions that control self-assembly in the protective shell of viruses has been published today in eLife.
NHS charging rules for non-residents 'unworkable' and harming wider UK health system
The current NHS regulations for charging those not ordinarily resident in the UK for treatment, such as migrants and short term visitors, are 'unworkable' and harmful to the wider health system, concludes an analysis of survey responses, published in BMJ Paediatrics Open.
Study: Football offensive linemen should start plays upright to avoid hits to the head
Just a simple change to the starting stance of players on the offensive line in American football could significantly reduce hits to the head, a study conducted by Purdue University and Stanford University researchers now shows.
Human pregnancy is weird -- new research adds to the mystery
University at Buffalo and University of Chicago scientists set out to investigate the evolution of a gene that helps women stay pregnant: the progesterone receptor gene.
Antibodies could provide new treatment for OCD
Mental health conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder could be treated in a new way using drugs that target the immune system, research suggests.

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