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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 30, 2020


Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS).
New STM technique points way to new and purer pharmaceuticals
A research project led by chemists at the University of Warwick first used ultrahigh resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy to see the exact location of atoms and bonds within a molecule, and then employed these incredibly precise images to determine the interactions that bond molecules to one another.
Creating buzz with potential end-users helps entrepreneurs with crowdfunding campaigns
Entrepreneurs launching a crowdfunding campaign to fund new product development benefit by reaching out early to engage with potential end-users, say business researchers from three universities.
Sun is less active than similar stars
By cosmic standards the sun is extraordinarily monotonous. This is the result of a study presented by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in the upcoming issue of Science.
High cost of cancer drugs not always justified
Do high prices of some cancer medicines have a higher benefit than those drugs with lower prices?
Novel method produces life-saving T cells from mesenchymal stromal cells
A new study released today in STEM CELLS suggests for the first time that regulatory T-cells (Treg) induced by mesenchymal stromal cells can yield an abundant replacement for naturally occurring T-cells, which are vital in protecting the body from infection.
Cardiorespiratory fitness assessment improves accuracy of health predictions
According to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier, taking cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) into account along with traditional risk factors such as age, sex, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking, improves the accuracy of mortality risk assessment.
A world first: Assessing kidney quality before transplantation using photoacoustic imaging
Demand for kidney transplants is so high that doctors now routinely accept damaged donor kidneys, with limited means to assess their quality.
New Princeton study takes superconductivity to the edge
The existence of superconducting currents, or supercurrents, along the exterior of a superconductor, has been surprisingly hard to find.
New clinical review casts doubt on use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19
In its May issue, The FASEB Journal is publishing a comprehensive review on the science and clinical experiences with the drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, first introduced as effective weapons against malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, and the autoimmune disease lupus.
Eyes send an unexpected signal to the brain
New research, led by Northwestern University, has found that a subset of retinal neurons sends inhibitory signals to the brain.
A new approach to measuring inequalities in development
A new study by researchers from IIASA and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology for the first time systematically explored and compared the use of the Human Life Indicator as a viable alternative to the conventional Human Development Index as a means of measuring progress in development.
Alternate light 5 times more effective in detecting bruises on victims of color
As a consequence of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, rates of domestic abuse have increased.
The ova of obese women have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids
A study conducted by researchers from the UPV/EHU, Cruces Hospital, the IVI Clinic Bilbao and Biocruces Bizkaia shows that the oocytes of obese or overweight women have a different composition of fatty acids.
Gravitational waves could prove the existence of the quark-gluon plasma
According to modern particle physics, matter produced when neutron stars merge is so dense that it could exist in a state of dissolved elementary particles.
Guide released for supporting the mental health of frontline COVID-19 staff
COVID-19 healthcare workers will be psychologically impacted by their work during the pandemic and will require psychological support from multiple levels in their organisations, according to a review by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, London's Air Ambulance and Barts Health NHS Trust, and a London-based A&E doctor.
New report: Advancing the 2030 Agenda in African cities through knowledge co-production
The challenges of sustainable urban development in African cities can best be met through an innovative approach that crosses boundaries between science, policy and society, according to a new report published by the International Science Council (ISC) today.
Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at UMass Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center.
Blood clotting a significant cause of death in patients with COVID-19
A study led by clinician scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences has found that Irish patients admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 infection are experiencing abnormal blood clotting that contributes to death in some patients.
Double bubbles pierce with less trouble
Two microscopic bubbles penetrate soft materials better than one, concludes a new study by engineers at UC Riverside.
Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi.
Gentler, safer hair dye based on synthetic melanin
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new hair dye process that is much milder than traditional hair dyes by using synthetic melanin to mimic natural human hair pigmentation.
Study finds highly elevated levels of fatty liver disease for 9/11 first responders
Toxin exposure appears to have contributed to dramatically higher rates of fatty liver disease among first responders to the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept.
First results from NASA's ICESat-2 mission map 16 years of melting ice sheets
By comparing new measurements from NASA's ICESat-2 mission with the original ICESat mission, which operated from 2003 to 2009, scientists were able to measure precisely how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
Scientists suggest using machine learning to predict materials' properties
Researchers suggested using machine learning methods to predict the properties of artificial sapphire crystals.
Water is key in catalytic conversion of methane to methanol
Scientists reveal new details that explain how a highly selective catalyst converts methane, the main component of natural gas, to methanol, an easy-to-transport liquid fuel and feedstock for making plastics, paints, and other commodity products.
Making safe choices: It's in our DNA
Researchers from Osaka University demonstrate the important role of DNA replication machinery in recombination pathway choice at the centromere of chromosomes to limit gross chromosomal rearrangements.
Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE.
Intricate magnetic configuration of 3D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers from Tohoku University and institutions in the UK, Germany and Switzerland has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3D chiral network-like nanostructures.
Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Males signalling their attractiveness to females are at risk from predators that exploit mating signals to detect and locate prey.
Understanding the diversity of cancer evolution based on computational simulation
Understanding the principles of cancer evolution is important in designing a therapeutic strategy.
Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed.
Cancer patients without insurance or with Medicaid don't get the same trial benefits
Cancer patients with no health insurance or those enrolled in Medicaid, the federal low-income health insurance program, see smaller survival benefits from experimental therapies in clinical trials, according to study results published today in JAMA Network Open.
Scientists use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers
A research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers.
African skeletons from early colonial Mexico tell the story of first-generation slaves
Three 16th-century skeletons from a mass burial in Mexico City highlight the role of the transatlantic slave trade in introducing and disseminating new pathogens to the Americas.
Plant extract combo may relieve hangover symptoms
A plant extract combination of fruits, leaves, and roots may help to relieve hangover symptoms, reveals research published online in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health.
Groovy photoelectrodes: How a textured surface can dramatically boost their performance
Water molecules can be split to produce hydrogen--a clean fuel--by leveraging solar energy and materials that can convert it into electricity.
New AI enables teachers to rapidly develop intelligent tutoring systems
Intelligent tutoring systems have been shown to be effective in helping to teach certain subjects, such as algebra or grammar, but creating these computerized systems is difficult and laborious.
Study on firms' return policies offers guidance on pricing, returns, refunds
A new study examined the decisions around the pricing and return policies of a retailer with both stores and online sales to help explain why some firms opt to fully refund customers for their returns while others charge a fee for online returns.
Research Brief: New recycling method could make polyurethane materials sustainable
Researchers at the University of Minnesota are part of a national team in the Center for Sustainable Polymers that has found a better way to recycle a versatile plastic material, called polyurethanes, that could prevent the material from becoming waste.
Temple scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed.
How catastrophic outburst floods may have carved Greenland's 'grand canyon'
For years, geologists have debated how and when canyons under the Greenland Ice Sheet formed, especially one called 'Greenland's Grand Canyon.' Its shape suggests it was carved by running water and glaciers, but until now its genesis remained unknown, scientists at UMass Amherst and Denmark's Center for Ice and Climate say.
Defining geographic regions with commuter data
A new mathematical approach uses data on people's commutes between and within US counties to identify important geographic regions.
Children who have difficult relationships with their moms are clingy towards teachers
Children who experience 'dependent' or clingy relationships with their preschool teachers tend to also have difficulties in their relationships with their mothers finds researchers at the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
Clinically-applicable math model predicts patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy
A group of our cancer and mathematics researchers at Houston Methodist have developed a clinically-applicable mathematical model to predict patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy.
Big data to help predict individual trauma patient outcome
China's National Center for Trauma Medicine are using big data to help identify trauma patients who could experience potential adverse health events in the emergency department through the aid of a clinical decision support system.
Cardiovascular impairment in COVID-19
Anti-inflammatory therapies should be used to treat COVID-19 patients that are at risk of, or have developed, cardiovascular problems, recommend leading cardiologists from Beijing, China, who have detailed the different ways that COVID-19 could trigger serious inflammatory-related cardiovascular issues in patients.
Persistent and worsening insomnia may predict persistent depression in older adults
Older adults with depression may be at much higher risk of remaining depressed if they are experiencing persistent or worsening sleep problems, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Low-income workers disproportionally affected by COVID-19
Low-income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the COVID-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study from UCL, Bank of Thailand, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and GRIPS, Tokyo.
Fecal transplantation improves outcomes in patients with multi-drug resistant organisms
Transferring fecal matter from the digestive systems of healthy donors to extremely ill patients who had previously been infected with drug-resistant bacteria resulted in shorter hospital stays, fewer bloodstream infections and infections that were easier to treat, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020.
Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter.
Catastrophic outburst floods carved Greenland's 'Grand Canyon'
Buried a mile beneath Greenland's thick ice sheet is a network of canyons so deep and long that the largest of these has been called Greenland's 'Grand Canyon.' This megacanyon's shape suggests it was carved by running water prior to widespread glaciation, but exactly when and how the island's grandest canyon formed are topics of intense debate.
Changes to gut microbiome may slow cancer growth in smokers
Changes to the gut microbiome interacted with the immune system to slow the growth of cancer in mice exposed to cigarette smoke, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020.
Gladstone scientists identify a new potential reservoir of latent HIV
In a recent paper in PLOS Pathogens, Gladstone Visiting Scientist Nadia Roan, Ph.D., and her team describe a class of cells that preferentially support latent infection by HIV.
Bermudagrass harvest management options with poultry litter fertilization
Managing Harvests of 'Russell' and 'Tifton 44' Bermudagrass Receiving Broiler Litter for Phosphorus Removal and Nutritive Value
Wake Forest Baptist shares key elements needed in setting up designated COVID-19 unit
In an effort to rapidly provide specialized care for patients with coronavirus-like symptoms while protecting the safety of health care workers, doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Health created a special respiratory isolation unit from an existing 24-bed medical-surgical unit in the hospital in Winston-Salem.
Some of the latest climate models provide unrealistically high projections of future warming
A new study from University of Michigan climate researchers concludes that some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases and therefore project future warming that is unrealistically high.
Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo.
Superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven material discovery
Scientists have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.
Experts apply microbiome research to agricultural science to increase crop yield
In an effort to increase crop yield, scientists at Northern Arizona University's Pathogen and Microbiome Institute (PMI) are working with Purdue University researchers to study the bacterial and fungal communities in soil to understand how microbiomes are impacting agricultural crops.
Telemedicine transforms response to COVID-19 pandemic in disease epicenter
A rapid increase in 'virtual' visits during the COVID-19 pandemic could transform the way physicians provide care in the United States going forward, according to a new study led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine.
Research reveals possibly active tectonic system on the Moon
Strange spots scattered across the Moon's nearside where bedrock is conspicuously exposed are evidence of seismic activity set in motion 4.3 billion years ago that could be ongoing today, the researchers say.
UBC discovery opens new avenues for designing drugs to combat drug-resistant malaria
For the first time, UBC researchers have shown a key difference in the three-dimensional structures of a key metabolic enzyme in the parasite that causes malaria compared to its human counterpart.
Smoking during pregnancy results in an increased risk of asthma even in adulthood
A recently completed study indicates that smoking by pregnant mothers caused roughly an 1.5-fold asthma risk in their offspring at the ages between 31 and 46.
Investors punish for social irresponsibility depending on proportion of company execs with law degrees
The extent to which investors punish firms for corporate social irresponsibility is associated with the proportion of top management executives in a firm who have a law degree, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
Machine learning enhances light-matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures
The discovery has promising possibilities for the development of a wide range of photonic devices and applications including those involved in optical sensing, optoacoustic vibrations, and narrowband filtering.
A census of star brightness: The sun is less active and variable than similar stars
By analyzing the brightness variations of 369 solar-like stars, researchers have concluded that the sun is less magnetically active and shows less variability in its brightness than similar stars in the galaxy.
The digital diagnostic helper: Apple Watch detects severe coronary ischemia
Apple watches have long been able to record electrocardiograms (ECGs) and send warnings in the event of an irregular heart rhythm such as atrial fibrillation.
Astronomers could spot life signs orbiting long-dead stars
To help future scientists make sense of what their telescopes are showing them, Cornell University astronomers have developed a spectral field guide for rocky worlds orbiting white dwarf stars.
Obese adults facing Medicaid expansion gap
Despite overall increases in insurance coverage for low-income individuals in Medicaid expansion states, some gaps remain for individuals who are obese.
'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users -- especially for long-term wear.
Marine litter in the Bay of Biscay
The scientific journal 'Marine Pollution Bulletin' has just published 'Microplastics in the Bay of Biscay: an overview', a piece of work by the 'Materials+Technologies' research group (GMT) of the Faculty of Engineering - Gipuzkoa.
Cultivating cooperation through kinship
Extensive cooperation among biologically unrelated individuals is uniquely human. It would be surprising if this uniqueness were not related to other uniquely human characteristics, yet current theories of human cooperation tend to ignore the human aspects of human behavior.
Naked mole-rats need carbon dioxide to avoid seizures and here's why
African naked mole-rats are sometimes referred to as animal superheroes.
Heart attack, stroke risk declines among people with diabetes
The rate of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications has improved among people with diabetes over the past 20 years, narrowing the gap in cardiovascular mortality rates between individuals with and without diabetes, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
The commercial consequences of collective layoffs
Layoff firms experience adverse changes in sales, advertising effectiveness, and price sensitivity.
Reduced obesity for weighted-vest wearers
Scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found a new method of reducing human body weight and fat mass using weighted vests.
NASA space laser missions map 16 years of ice sheet loss
Using the most advanced Earth-observing laser instrument NASA has ever flown in space, scientists have made precise, detailed measurements of how the elevation of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
Older men with sarcopenia are more likely to develop diabetes over time
Older men who have lower lean body mass as they age are more prone to developing diabetes, while similar findings were not found in older women, according to a new study published in Journal of the Endocrine Society.
Study estimates cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in wake of COVID-19
A new study shows the cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in host nations for the first time, as researchers urge resources to be provided in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Researchers are developing potential treatment for chronic pain
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new way to treat chronic pain which has been tested in mice.
Stroke experts offer guidelines for treatment during pandemic
Stroke researchers at the University of Cincinnati have released a new report recommending the proper protocol for delivering lifesaving treatment to stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.
New players in the programmed cell death mechanism
Skoltech researchers have identified a set of proteins that are important in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death.
Energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms, and conveyed ashore as hydrogen fuel
Researchers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering -Vitoria-Gasteiz have proposed using the energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms to produce hydrogen in situ instead of conveying it ashore by cable.
VCU study finds that many published psychology experiments lack evidence of validity
An examination of nearly 350 published psychological experiments found that nearly half failed to show that they were based on a valid foundation of empirical evidence, suggesting that a wide swath of psychological science is based on an 'untested foundation.'
Different trigger points for seeking healthcare may explain gender divide
Men might not be more reluctant to see a doctor than women are, as is popularly believed, but may simply have different trigger points for seeking healthcare, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
NHS 'turning a blind eye' to labor rights violations in the trade of masks and gloves
Yet there is a murkier scandal about the procurement of these everyday items that the NHS has yet to face, writes Jane Feinmann, freelance journalist in The BMJ today.
HRM practices a predictor for business resilience after layoffs
As retrenchments continue to cloud the foreseeable future of businesses worldwide, new research from the University of South Australia, the University of Melbourne and RMIT indicates that some businesses will fare better than others -- and it's all dependent on their type of human resource management system.
Climate-smart agricultural practices increase maize yield in Malawi
Climate change creates extreme weather patterns that are especially challenging for people in developing countries and can severely impact agricultural yield and food security.
Unlocking promising properties to create future technologies
At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, researchers working at the intersection of materials science, chemical engineering, and physics are uncovering new and innovative ways to unlock those promising and useful abilities using light, temperature, pressure, or magnetic fields.
UCF researchers develop groundbreaking new rocket-propulsion system
A University of Central Florida researcher and his team have developed an advanced new rocket-propulsion system once thought to be impossible.
Astronomers capture rare images of planet-forming disks around stars
An international team of astronomers has captured fifteen images of the inner rims of planet-forming disks located hundreds of light years away.
The story of three African slaves during Spanish colonialism, as told by their bones
In a study appearing April 30 in the journal Current Biology, scientists tell the story of three 16th century African slaves identified from a mass burial site in Mexico City.
Working as peer-support specialist helps people with criminal and psychiatric histories
As houses of detention increasingly turn to early-release initiatives in the pandemic, a study explores a hopeful reintegration path for the formerly incarcerated with mental illness.
Pharmacists warn against malarial drugs as a cure for coronavirus
Early reports that anti-malarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could be used to prevent and cure the virus have received a caution from Huddersfield pharmacists in an article published in the British Journal of Pharmacy.
New discovery explains how the prostate gland regenerates itself
Androgen-deprivation therapy, a mainstay of prostate cancer treatment, may give prostate cells new growth abilities, scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering have found.
GSA's journal's add two articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus webinar on confronting ageism
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19.
COVID-19 personal protective equipment causes serious skin injuries
A new study of medical staff treating COVID-19-infected patients found 42.8% experienced serious skin injury related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, goggles, face shields, and protective gowns.
Two new AHA statements focus on heart failure: How social determinants can affect outcomes; impact on caregivers
Adverse social factors, such as insurance status, food insecurity, lack of funds for medication and others, may lead to worse heart failure outcomes.
COVID-19 diagnostic tests highlighted in special report
As the new coronavirus continues to claim lives, the race is on to develop fast, convenient and accurate diagnostic tests for COVID-19.
Coffee plants have a small but consistent core microbiome of fungi and bacteria
These scientists explored the tissues of coffee roots to look for signs of a 'core microbiome,' or for signs of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, that form partnerships with the coffee plant.
A new way to accurately estimate COVID-19 death toll
A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world.
9/11 research reveals effective strategies to cope with COVID-19 stress
Research into mass trauma events, like the 9/11 terror attacks, suggests effective ways to cope during the current COVID-19 crisis, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Cracking the Lyme disease code
The next time a tick feeds on you, Washington State University researchers hope to make sure persistent arthritis caused by Lyme disease doesn't linger for a lifetime.
Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease.
Does 'participatory budgeting' lead to political patronage?
Researchers ask whether 'Participatory Budgeting' in New York City has become a vehicle for vote-getting by municipal legislators.
Virginia Tech researchers link rare medical condition to its cause
Using CRISPR genome editing in zebrafish, scientists with the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC linked an undiagnosed human disease with a rare genetic mutation that causes craniofacial abnormalities.
Study helps arboreta, botanical gardens meet genetic diversity conservation goals
In a groundbreaking study, an international team of 21 scientists evaluated five genera spanning the plant tree of life (Hibiscus, Magnolia, Pseudophoenix, Quercus and Zamia) to understand how much genetic diversity currently exists in collections in botanical gardens and arboreta worldwide.
Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19
An international team of researchers has outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, ranging from how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news to how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress.
Optical 'nanomixer': Scientists propose new method for mixing liquids
Every now and then, scientists need to control the process of mixing liquids in vessels so small that the thinnest needle or even a hair wouldn't fit in there.
Research helps police understand child to parent abuse more than ever before
Researchers have provided detailed insights and recommendations to help one of the UK's largest police forces recognise, report and analyse instances of violence from children towards parents.
Mole-rats' failure to social distance offers clue for treating some neurological disorders
A new study into why African naked mole-rats shun social distancing in favor of crowded sleeping arrangements provides insight into what may be occurring in the brains of people with certain neurological conditions, including autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and schizophrenia.
Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea.
Racial inequalities in liver cancer deaths soared after launch of hepatitis C drugs
Before and after the introduction of lifesaving drugs for hepatitis C, researchers found that from 1979 to 1998, racial inequalities in mortality from liver cancer in the US were declining.

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