Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 05, 2020
New evidence that higher caffeine and urate levels are protective against Parkinson's
Two purines, caffeine and urate, have been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in multiple study groups and populations.

Greater availability of non-alcoholic drinks may reduce alcohol consumption
People are more likely to opt for non-alcoholic drinks if there are more of them available than alcoholic drinks, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health.

Study pinpoints metrics of cost-effective screening for type 1 diabetes
Led by Marian Rewers, MD, Ph.D., at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the Autoimmunity Screening for Kids (ASK) study has screened 25,000 children between 1-17 years old in the Denver metro area.

Laws that punish pregnant drug abusers aren't working, new study finds
A new study shows that laws that punish substance use during pregnancy actually do more harm than good.

Simulations forecast nationwide increase in human exposure to extreme climate events
Using ORNL's now-decommissioned Titan supercomputer, a team of researchers estimated the combined consequences of many different extreme climate events at the county level, a unique approach that provided unprecedented regional and national climate projections that identified the areas most likely to face climate-related challenges.

Scientists take steps to create a 'racetrack memory,' potentially enhancing data storage
A team of scientists has taken steps to create a new form of digital data storage, a ''Racetrack Memory,'' which opens the possibility to both bolster computer power and lead to the creation of smaller, faster, and more energy efficient computer memory technologies.

COVID-19 symptom tracker smartphone app could predict outbreak hotspots
Daily symptoms logged by more than two and a half million users of the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker, a mobile application launched in March 2020, suggest the tool could help to predict geographical hotspots of COVID-19 incidence up to a week in advance of official public health reports.

Supportive oncodermatology interventions improve patient quality of life
A recent survey from the GW Cancer Center found that enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score.

Heating could be the best way to disinfect N95 masks for reuse
Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, N95 face masks have been in short supply.

Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility in human cancers
Volume 11, Issue 18 of @Oncotarget Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility assessed by ATAC-seq profiling in human cancers especially in a large patient cohort is largely unknown.

A new compound removes senescent cells and reduces toxicity in cancer treatment
Researchers at CIBER-BBN, the Universitat Politècnica de València, the Principe Felipe Research Center and the University of Cambridge confirm the therapeutic potential of using a new conjugated drug, Nav-Gal, in combination with chemotherapy.

Four years of calculations lead to new insights into muon anomaly
Two decades ago, an experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory pinpointed a mysterious mismatch between established particle physics theory and actual lab measurements.

Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly.

People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear.

Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas
Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation.

Supercapacitor promises storage, high power and fast charging
A new supercapacitor based on manganese oxide could combine the storage capacity of batteries with the high power and fast charging of other supercapacitors, according to researchers at Penn State and two universities in China.

Innovative drunk driving program lowers risk of rearrest
Law enforcement and drug treatment officials struggle to break the cycle of people who are repeatedly arrested for drunk driving and related offences.

Scientists revealed usefulness of culinary herbs
A group of scientists from Sechenov University, Russia, and La Trobe University, Australia, have developed a fast and cost-effective method of detecting and identifying bioactive compounds in complex samples such as plant extracts.

All-fiber optical wavelength converter
Wavelength conversion in all-fiber structure has extensive applications in new fiber-laser sources, signal processing, and multi-parameter sensors.

More berries, apples and tea may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's
Older adults with low intake of foods and drinks containing flavonoids, such as berries, apples, and tea, were more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and related dementias over 20 years, compared with people who consumed more of those items, according to a new study.

Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.

AMP recommends minimum set of pharmacogenetic alleles to help standardize clinical genotyping testing for warfarin response
AMP has published consensus, evidence-based recommendations to aid in the design, validation and interpretation of clinical genotyping tests for the prediction of warfarin response.

Extreme Ultraviolet imaging displays potential to enhance study of Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have published highly-detailed images of lab-grown neurons using Extreme Ultraviolet radiation that could aid the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases.

Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories -- and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process.

MRI technique could reduce need for radiation in measuring tumor response to chemotherapy
Whole body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) may aid in the assessment of cancer treatment response in children and youth at much lower levels of radiation than current approaches, suggests a small study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Real-time data show COVID-19 led to 60% drop in leisure, hospitality and retail employment
There is no doubt that the COVID-19 crisis is affecting the US economy and labor markets in an unprecedented way.

Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival.

UCLA researchers develop chemistry needed to create marijuana breathalyzer
UCLA chemists report the key chemical discovery necessary for the creation of a small, electronic marijuana breathalyzer.

UK public 'most concerned' about coronavirus -- more than Spain or Italy
'Risk perception; among UK population greater than in nine other countries surveyed for latest study.

Surf and turf: Green new deal should be a 'teal new deal'
Incorporating the oceans into climate policy is essential, scientists say in a new paper.

Potato power: Spuds serve high quality protein that's good for women's muscle
Researchers from McMaster University have found that the potato, primarily known as a starchy vegetable, can be a source of high-quality protein that helps to maintain muscle.

Early government intervention is key to reducing the spread of COVID-19
Researchers compared the spread of COVID-19 infections between Hunan province in China and Italy.

Considering social influences across the customer journey
Including social influences into customer journey models uncovers new implications for marketers.

Saving energy and lives: How a solar chimney can boost fire safety
Built as part of the sustainable features of a new Australian building, the specially-designed solar chimney radically boosts safe evacuation time in a fire - from 2 minutes to over 14 minutes.

Evaluation of pedestrian walking speed change patterns at crosswalks in palestine
One of the main pedestrian issues considered in facilities and traffic signal design is pedestrian walking speed.

From expressions to mind wandering: Using computers to illuminate human emotions
A common view of human emotions is that they are too idiosyncratic and subjective to be studied scientifically.

How race affects listening during political conversations
A new study offers a rare look at how black and white people listen to each other during political discussions, including those that touch on controversial issues about race.

Lymphatic vessels in mice and humans: Alike yet different
In an international collaboration, researchers from Uppsala University have mapped the lymph node lymphatic vessels in mice and humans down to the level of individual cells.

New tumour sampling method significantly improves genetic testing for cancer treatment
A wholistic tumour sampling method that more accurately detects genetic alterations in tumours, which are critical in allowing treatment to be personalised to each and every patient, has been developed by researchers from the Crick, Roche and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

Continuity of buprenorphine treatment linked to significantly lower prescription opioid use and over
A study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that long-term buprenorphine treatment is associated with improvements in health care outcomes.

Unraveling one of prion disease's deadly secrets
In a new paper in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology by Tricia Serio, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UMass Amherst, and others, report an unanticipated role for prion nucleation seeds that enhances their ability to appear and resist curing.

Benefits of higher doses of certain medicines fail to justify costs and risks, study shows
Clinical trial data behind drug dose recommendations for elevated cholesterol and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease illustrate how larger doses may not be worth the extra costs for many types of patients.

Miniature version of human vein allows study of deep vein thrombosis
The Vein-Chip device, a miniaturized version of a large human vein, allowed scientists to study changes in vein wall cells, blood flow and other functions that lead to deep vein thrombosis in humans.

Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of 'stress memory' in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.

Novel necklace detects abnormal heart rhythm
An ingenious necklace which detects abnormal heart rhythm will be showcased for the first time on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

New test could guarantee the perfect avocado
A technique for measuring the ripeness of avocados could reduce waste by up to 10% and help fulfil consumer demand for ready-to-eat fruit.

Exeter student leads research concluding that small red blood cells could indicate cancer
Having abnormally small red blood cells - a condition known as microcytosis - could indicate cancer, according to new research led by a University of Exeter student working with a world-leading team.

Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight.

Veterans battle homelessness long after discharge from the military
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, homelessness among US military veterans rarely occurs immediately after military discharge, but instead takes years to manifest with risk increasing over subsquent years.

Liquid metal research invokes 'Terminator' film -- but much friendlier
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed 'the first liquid metal lattice in the world.' The team has created a series of prototypes that return to their shapes when crushed.

Germline genomic profiles of children, young adults with solid tumors to inform managementand treatment
A new Cleveland Clinic study demonstrates the importance of genetics evaluation and genetic testing for children, adolescents and young adults with solid tumor cancers.

Already vulnerable, gig economy workers in SF suffer during pandemic, survey finds
A new survey of app-based workers in San Francisco underscores the financial vulnerability of workers in the gig economy -- and the coronavirus has made their plight much worse.

Editing selfies is counter productive: Study
Girls and young women shouldn't spend a lot of time editing selfies for social media because it negatively influences their thoughts about their looks, according to a new Flinders University publication.

Non-caloric sweetener reduces signs of fatty liver disease in preclinical research study
Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigator shows that non-caloric sweetener stevia decreases signs of fatty liver disease in a pre-clinical model.

Researchers release COVID-19 symptom tracker app
Early use of the app by more than 2.5 million people in the US and the UK has generated valuable data about COVID-19 for physicians, scientists, and public officials to better fight the viral outbreak.

Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of French researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles.

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists.

Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine.

Coronavirus structure clue to high infection rate
Cornell University researchers studying the structure of the virus that causes COVID-19 have found a unique feature that could explain why it is so transmissible between people.

AI -- a new tool for cardiac diagnostics
Artificial intelligence (AI) may be an aid to interpreting ECG results, helping healthcare staff to diagnose diseases that affect the heart.

Genetic scoring can identify more men at risk for aortic aneurysm
A genetic risk score from a blood test identified more men age 50 and older who are at higher risk of an aortic aneurysm and could benefit from ultrasound screening.

UB investigators uncover cellular mechanism involved in Krabbe disease
Researchers determined which cells are involved in Krabbe disease and by which mechanism.

Association of use of ACEI, ARB with testing positive for COVID-19
This observational study assessed the association between the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers with the likelihood of testing positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

PPE, plus training, lowers risk of COVID-19 for health care workers
Health care workers carry a significant burden of coronavirus infections worldwide, but a new evidence review shows the rate can be lowered with the use of personal protective equipment combined with proper training in infection control.

Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource during all year.

All disease models are 'wrong,' but scientists are working to fix that
What can researchers do when their mathematical models of the spread of infectious diseases don't match real-world data?

Considering how many firms can meet pollutant standards can spur green tech development
A new study developed a model of regulation in which the probability of a stricter standard being enacted increased with the proportion of firms in an industry that could meet the standard.

Otters juggle stones when hungry, research shows
Hunger is likely to be the main driver of stone juggling in otters, new research has shown.

Spending time in the garden linked to better health and wellbeing
Spending time in the garden is linked to similar benefits for health and wellbeing as living in wealthy areas, according to a new large-scale study.

Long-term developments of energy pricing and consumption in industry
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have collaborated with British economists to study how energy consumption by Swiss industry develops depending on energy pricing.

Bluetooth-enabled device detects fermentation process over days
Electrochemical reactions include the transformation of sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide, and similar processes occur when the body breaks down food, drugs or other compounds.

40 years of A Piece of My Mind essays
JAMA is commemorating 40 years of publishing A Piece of My Mind essays with this theme issue of 40 favorite essays from the past 10 years.

Grandfamilies: New study uncovers common themes and challenges in kinship care
The opioid crisis and other social issues have left millions of US grandparents raising their grandchildren.

Biocontrol most cost-effective in fight against common pest pear Opuntia stricta
Dactylopius opuntiae 'stricta' biotype is more effective as a sustainable biocontrol against invasive common pest pear Opuntia stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya, compared to physical and/or chemical control.

Genetic variation in a brain-cleansing water channel affects human sleep
The reason why we sleep remains an unresolved question of the 21st century.

Blueprint to protect the mental health of frontline medical workers
University of Queensland researchers have developed a set of recommendations to manage the mental health of frontline medical workers during viral outbreaks, such as COVID-19.

Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals.

Recent Australian wildfires made worse by logging
Logging of native forests increases the risk and severity of fire and likely had a profound effect on the recent, catastrophic Australian bushfires, according to new research.

How David wins against Goliath in established industry
Small and medium firms can develop new market categories together when they lack adequate resources to do so individually.

Inhibiting thrombin protects against dangerous infant digestive disease
A new preclinical study by researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers promise of a specific treatment for NEC, a rare inflammatory bowel disease that is a leading cause of death in premature infants.

Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs -- if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

Potential new treatment for severe dry eye disease, RCSI Research
Scientists have discovered a potential new treatment for a disease that causes severe dry eyes and dry mouth.

Lockdown or lockup
Because of wide variation in demographic, case definition, testing and other parameters, comparisons are difficult.

Genetic study ties higher alcohol consumption to increased stroke and PAD risk
Using genetic analysis, researchers found higher alcohol consumption increased risks for stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Story tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark
ORNL Story Tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark.

Demographic expansion of several Amazonian archaeological cultures by computer simulation
Expansions by groups of humans were common during prehistoric times, after the adoption of agriculture.

Decoding the skies: The impact of water vapor on afternoon rainfall
On days when wind blows in little atmospheric moisture, afternoon rainfall is more likely to occur over wetter soils or higher relative humidity.

Timing of maturity, feelings about ethnicity and race can positively affect black males' self-concept, well-being
Black males start puberty at younger ages than males of other racial or ethnic groups, and early puberty has been linked to risks for negative outcomes, yet we know little about how black males navigate the changes in their bodies or understand their social identities.

Multifunctional porous carbon fibers show significant promise in capacitive desalination
Researchers have developed a material that is up to 40 times faster in desalinating small batches of water than other materials available today.

A hydrological model leads to advances in the creation of a world water map
The University of Cordoba participated in the first shaping of a hydrological model on a basin scale as a global model to advance in world hydrological predictions.

Study reports high level of hazardous drinking among Pacific Islander young adults in US
Pacific Islander young adults in the US have an extremely high level of hazardous drinking and potential alcohol-use disorders, a University of California, Riverside, study has found.

Gene variants that protect against glaucoma identified, opening therapeutic possibilities
An international research collaboration led by researchers from the University of Helsinki and Stanford University has identified rare changes in a gene called ANGPTL7 that lower intraocular pressure and significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma.

New therapeutic targets for treating memory impairment in Down syndrome
Researchers from Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute studied the neural basis of intellectual disability in mice with Down syndrome and discovered that the neural networks of brain circuits relevant to memory and learning are over-activated and that the connectivity of these circuits is poor.

NUS researchers develop novel device to improve performance of underactive bladders
Researchers from NUS and the University of Tokyo have developed a new device that can monitor bladder volume in real-time and effectively empty the bladder.

Age of NGC 6652 globular cluster specified
Senior Research Associate Margarita Sharina (Special Astrophysical Observatory) and Associate Professor Vladislav Shimansky (Kazan Federal University) studied the globular cluster NGC 6652.4.05957 and found out that its age is close to 13.6 billion years, which makes it one of the oldest objects in the Milky Way.

Canadian chiropractors remove vaccination info on websites after media coverage
The research team conducted a prospective cohort study focused on Canadian chiropractors' websites between July 2016 and April 2019.

Cognition and gait speed often decline together, study shows
Measures of cognition and gait speed largely paralleled each other in a San Antonio study of 370 participants that included 9½ years of follow-up.

Genetic doppelgaengers: Emory research provides insight into two neurological puzzles
Insight into the pathological mechanisms behind two devastating neurodegenerative diseases: the most common inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 (SCA36).

Amphibian study shows stress increases vulnerability to virus
Researchers found that wood frogs, known for their ability to survive being frozen through, are more susceptible to lethal ranavirus infections if they have been raised in ponds high in salinity from road deicer.

Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 offer insights into virus evolution
By analyzing virus genomes from over 7,500 people infected with COVID-19, a UCL-led research team has characterized patterns of diversity of SARS-CoV-2 virus genome, offering clues to direct drugs and vaccine targets, in a study published today in Infection, Genetics and Evolution.

Screw cancer: Microneedle sticks it to cancer tissue
A drug-loaded microrobotic needle effectively targets and remains attached to cancerous tissue in lab experiments without needing continuous application of a magnetic field, allowing more precise drug delivery.

A drug proves effective in the treatment of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in animals
The medicine, tested on rabbits, reduces complications from the treatment for the disease, a common veterinarian emergency among dogs and horses that stops blood circulation in the intestine.

Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy.

Oceans should have a place in climate 'green new deal' policies, scientists suggest
The world's oceans play a critical role in climate regulation, mitigation and adaptation and should be integrated into comprehensive 'green new deal' proposals being promoted by elected officials and agency policymakers.

Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Mass General advancing novel gene-based COVID-19 vaccine, AAVCOVID
A unique COVID-19 genetic vaccine program is underway with Mass.

University of Arizona researchers identify potential pathway to make opioids safer, more effective
Researchers from the UArizona College of Medicine -- Tucson Department of Pharmacology found that inhibiting heat shock protein 90 in the spinal cord enhanced the efficacy of morphine -- a finding that could be used decrease the adverse side effects of opioid therapy.

An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor at Université de Montréal has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavour profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality.

Safely relaxing social distancing comes down to numbers
Your house number could be the key to the safe relaxation of COVID-19-related restrictions if governments follow a new exit strategy proposal published today in the British Medical Journal.

Positive health beliefs may reduce blood pressure post-stroke, especially among women
Having positive health beliefs--specifically, the perception that you can protect yourself from having another stroke--is linked to lower blood pressure among stroke survivors, especially women.

Brain emotional activity linked to blood vessel inflammation in recent heart attack patients
People with recent heart attacks have significantly higher activity in a brain area (the amygdala) involved in stress perception and emotional response.

Colorado emergency departments take new steps to prevent youth suicide
new study conducted in seven Front Range emergency departments demonstrated success in helping parents make their homes safer when a teen is distressed.

Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans.

Study finds unexpected suspect in age-related macular degeneration
Scientists have identified an unexpected player in the immune reaction gone awry that causes vision loss in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new study published today in eLife.

Race-specific lupus nephritis biomarkers
A University of Houston biomedical researcher has discovered a difference in urinary biomarker proteins of lupus nephritis in patients according to race.

Epidemiologists develop new tool for measuring the pace of aging across the life course
A study just released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health is reporting a blood-DNA-methylation measure that is sensitive to variation in the pace of biological aging among individuals born the same year.

Broadband enhancement relies on precise tilt
If a photon source could be placed on a single chip and made to produce photons at a high rate, this could enable high-speed quantum communication or information processing.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.