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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 06, 2020


Unplanned extubations in preterm infants leads to poor outcomes, increased care costs
Unplanned extubations in adult and pediatric populations have long been associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased costs to health care systems.
Killing 'sleeper cells' may enhance breast cancer therapy
The anti-cancer medicine venetoclax could improve the current therapy for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer - the most common form of breast cancer in Australia - according to preclinical studies led by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers.
Controlling your home by the power of thought
Neuroscientists at the German Primate Center developed a new experimental environment to study action plans during walking.
Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes.
Public would obey major changes to antibiotic advice, research shows
The public would comply with major changes to medical advice - but would then be less likely to follow other new guidelines in the future, research shows.
First-in-kind study reveals genetic markers of type 2 diabetes in East Asians
This research, published in Nature, shows how different populations of people share most of the genetic susceptibilities to developing type 2 diabetes but do have some different genetic variations that can make them more or less susceptible to developing the condition.
New imaging method gives insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange -- that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs.
Ultraviolet light exposes contagion spread from improper PPE use
Despite PPE use, reports show that many health care workers contracted COVID-19.
Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey.
High reliance on urgent care centers may disrupt primary care in children
A study of over 4 million children and adolescents in the US enrolled in Medicaid found that those who rely on urgent care centers for more than a third of their outpatient health care needs had fewer visits to primary care providers.
Climate change could reawaken Indian Ocean El Niño
Global warming is approaching a tipping point that during this century could reawaken an ancient climate pattern similar to El Niño in the Indian Ocean, new research led by scientists from the University of Texas at Austin has found.
Position statement addresses difficult issue: allocating scare resources in COVID-19 era
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on societies worldwide, given the pandemic's rapid, often deadly spread.
Fluorescent technique brings aging polymers to light
Modern society relies on polymers, such as polypropylene or polyethylene plastic, for a wide range of applications, from food containers to automobile parts to medical devices.
Graphene sets sail in microgravity
ESA-backed researchers demonstrate the laser-propulsion of graphene sails in microgravity.
A new biomarker for the aging brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified changes in the aging brain related to blood circulation.
Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?
New research published in International Journal Eating Disorders revealed a consistent and direct link between posting edited photos on Instagram and risk factors for eating disorders.
International Society of Hypertension release global practice guidelines
High blood pressure (hypertension) is the leading cause of death in the world affecting more than 1.4 billion people and accounting for more than 28,000 deaths each day.
Regularly attending religious services associated with lower risk of deaths of despair
People who attended religious services at least once a week were significantly less likely to die from 'deaths of despair,' including deaths related to suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning, according to new research led by Harvard T.H.
Gas nanomedicine: An emerging cutting-edge field
Several therapeutic gases are quite helpful for treatment of many inflammation-related diseases including cancer, but also exhibit some shortcomings such as limited therapy efficacy.
Unveiling the structure of SARS-CoV-2
While the novel coronavirus has ground much of daily life to a halt, researchers around the world are working overtime to find solutions.
Trump's election didn't cause a large increase in depression among US Democrats
''Broadly speaking, our data suggest that America did not get more depressed because of Trump, at least in the first year after his election,'' says Prof.
New trial platform could accelerate finding a cure for Parkinson's disease
Despite 30 years of research, not a single therapy has been found to successfully delay or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD).
Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit -- a process called oxidation.
'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown.
Effect of face-aging app on skin cancer protection behavior
This randomized clinical trial looked at the effect of a face-aging mobile app on daily sunscreen use and other skin protection among teens in Brazil.
Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB?
Study finds 'volume dial' for turning neural communication up or down
MIT neuroscientists find that the protein Synaptotagmin 7 limits the supply of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles for release at synapses.
Going against the trend
Global warming has affected the entire planet's surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which has bucked the trend.
Research found a new way to make functional materials based on polymers of metal clusters
Researchers at the universities of Jyvaskyla and Xiamen discovered a novel way to make functional macroscopic crystalline materials out of nanometer-size 34-atom silver-gold intermetallic clusters.
Use of emergency contraceptive pills among Scandinavian women
Use of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) is common among Scandinavian women, with one-third having used them at least once, according to a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.
A study by TalTech geneticists revealed new potential causes of female infertility
Over the last six years a group of Estonian geneticists led by Associate Professor Agne Velthut-Meikas and a PhD student Ilmatar Rooda from TalTech Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology have studied genes previously associated primarily with female hormone synthesis and ovarian follicle development.
Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals.
Transforming surgery in the aftermath of COVID-19
To restart surgeries cancelled because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Canada needs to adopt single-entry models (SEMs) with team-based care, argues a commentary https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/05/06/cmaj.200791.full.pdf in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Indicators of cancer may also be markers of heart failure
Heart failure and cancer are conditions with a number of shared characteristics.
Surfaces that grip like gecko feet could be easily mass-produced
The science behind sticky gecko's feet lets gecko adhesion materials pick up about anything.
Association of attendance at religious services, risk of death from despair among health care workers
The association between self-reported attendance at religious services among health care workes and risk of death from despair (related to drugs, alcohol and suicide) was examined in this observational study.
New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people.
Music and filmmaking can transform undergraduate student perceptions of dementia
Undergraduate arts and music departments may represent untapped resources for building up the workforce needed to care for older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
Sewage poses potential COVID-19 transmission risk, experts warn
Environmental biologists at the University of Stirling have warned that the potential spread of COVID-19 via sewage 'must not be neglected' in the battle to protect human health.
Cholesterol lowering drugs linked to improved gut bacteria composition in obese people
Obese Europeans who are treated with cholesterol lowering drugs have not only lower values of blood LDL cholesterol and markers of inflammation but in addition a more healthy gut bacteria profile than those obese who are not prescribed statins.
Diminished returns of educational attainment on heart disease among black Americans
Using a nationally representative sample, the researchers explored racial/ethnic variation in the link between educational attainment and heart disease among American adults.
Fly ash geopolymer concrete: Significantly enhanced resistance to extreme alkali attack
Fly ash generated by coal-fired power stations is a global environmental headache, creating groundwater and air pollution from vast landfills and ash dams.
Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Interesting signatures of the Rose Parade were captured by fiber optic telecommunications cable lying below the parade route.
Moderate exercise in middle and older age cuts time spent in hospital
Men and women aged 40-79 are at 25-27% lower risk of long or frequent hospital admissions if they do some form of physical activity, a new study suggests.
Children & coronavirus infection (COVID-19): How to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder
COVID-19 is a pandemic that has forced many states to declare restrictive measures in order to prevent their wider spread.
We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found.
Prime time for lower extremity artery disease
This article provides an overview of the indications and techniques of lower extremity revascularisation, and an in-depth analysis of the available evidence regarding type and duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment following endovascular and surgical revascularisation.
Management of inflammatory bowel diseases: Clinical perspectives
In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), leading international experts provide a comprehensive update on the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) for the practicing clinician
Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live predicted
A microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots.
Antioxidant reverses damage to fertility caused by exposure to bisphenol A
A study shows that administering coenzyme Q10 reverses damage done to germinative cells by BPA, a contaminant found in many kinds of plastic.
Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, a Stanford-led research team concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.'
Shedding new light on nanolasers using 2D semiconductors
Cun-Zheng Ning, a professor of electrical engineering in the Ira A.
Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors.
Cost-benefit analysis of funding a smoking cessation program before surgery
For patients undergoing surgery, smoking is linked with a higher risk of experiencing complications following their procedure, and quitting smoking before surgery may help reduce this risk.
Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers.
Workers happy despite crisis and uncertainty
In general, workers in Switzerland and Germany are coping well with the COVID-19 crisis and the associated social disruption.
Arizona State University scientists rewire photosynthesis to fuel our future
Hydrogen is an essential commodity with over 60 million tons produced globally every year.
Examining health insurance nondiscrimination policies with mental health among gender minority individuals
A large private health insurance database was used to examine the association between between health insurance nondiscrimination policies and mental health outcomes for gender minority individuals.
Living in a rural environment enhances mental well-being among the elderly
The mental well-being of the elderly refers to how they perceive their everyday existence, i.e., if their outlook is positive or negative, which, in turn, makes their life pleasant or unpleasant.
Programming with the light switch
Freiburg researchers show how to control individual components of self-assembling molecular structures.
Day services benefit patients with Alzheimer's disease
Day services--programs designed to provide stimulation in a safe environment during the day for adults with physical and mental impairments -- may help improve the cognitive function of adults with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in Psychogeriatrics.
New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual.
Winter warm spells see an increase in duration and frequency in UK temperature records
Warm winter spells have increased in frequency and duration two- to three times over since 1878, according to scientists led by the University of Warwick.
Intel from an outpatient COVID-19 clinic
A new report offers insights that can help clinicians distinguish between patients with COVID-19 infections and those with other conditions that may mimic COVID-19 symptoms.
NEJM study shows drug saves lives of kids fighting deadly immune disease
After 20 years of trying, modern medicine remains unable to lower the roughly 40% mortality rate for the severe childhood immune disease called HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis), which damages vital organs and tissues.
Children don't know how to get proper nutrition information online
Children looking for health information online could end up more prone to obesity.
Cortexyme publishes data on P. gingivalis ability to infect neurons
Cortexyme, Inc. (Nasdaq: CRTX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering a novel, disease-modifying therapeutic approach to treat what it believes to be a key underlying cause of Alzheimer's (AD) and other degenerative diseases, today announced the publication of research further documenting the ability of the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis to invade neurons and trigger Alzheimer's-like neuropathology.
What influences adolescents to continuously use e-cigarettes?
In a Public Health Nursing study of adolescents who have used e-cigarettes in the past month, certain factors were associated with frequent use.
USTC has made significant progress in many-body simulation based on Rydberg atoms
The Group of Academician GUO Guangcan has made significant progress in the research of Rydberg Atom: Prof.
Researchers identify a fundamental protein to guarantee liver regeneration
Researchers from the University of Barcelona and the CELLEX Biomedical Research Centre from IDIBAPS, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Sydney, University of London and the Research Institute Sant Joan de Déu, have identified in a study with mice a protein which is fundamental to guarantee the restoration and regeneration of the liver after a transplant or hepatic surgery.
SMART researchers uncover new anti-phage defence mechanisms in bacteria
Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Wuhan University, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Tsinghua University have discovered a previously unknown anti-phage defence mechanism in some bacteria that uses unique new ways to protect itself against phages.
How does nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China?
Scientists investigate how nitrogen dynamics affects carbon and water budgets in China by incorporating the terrestrial nitrogen cycle into the Noah Land Surface Model.
Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover
Research on the Great Barrier Reef has found severe coral loss to be associated with substantial increases in the size of large, long-living herbivorous fish.
Inactivated vaccine candidate protects macaques from SARS-CoV-2 infection
In mice, rats, and nonhuman primates, a newly developed SARS-CoV-2 virus vaccine candidate induced antibodies that neutralized several different SARS-CoV-2 strains.
How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the puzzle of how small chromosomes ensure that they aren't skipped over during meiosis, the process that makes sperm and egg.
The unexpected benefits of tailored exercise for aged care residents
Tailored exercise programs led by accredited exercise physiologists don't just provide physical benefits for residents living in aged care -- they improve mental wellbeing and social engagement, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research.
Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria -- until now.
Interleukin-12 electroporation may sensitize 'cold' melanomas to immunotherapies
Combining intratumoral electroporation of interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA (tavokinogene telseplasmid, or TAVO) with the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) led to clinical responses in patients with immunologically quiescent advanced melanoma, according to results from a phase II trial.
Fighting autoimmunity and cancer: The nutritional key
Scientists at the Department of Infection and Immunity of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) revealed a novel mechanism through which the immune system controls autoimmunity and cancer.
Light sensors detect larval pests munching on date palms
Optical fibers wrapped around date palm trunks could help detect this tree's most destructive pest early enough to save it.
Focused ultrasound opening brain to previously impossible treatments
Focused ultrasound, the researchers hope, could revolutionize treatment for conditions from Alzheimer's to epilepsy to brain tumors -- and even help repair the devastating damage caused by stroke.
Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere.
Spin-dependent processes in the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride
Quantum technology was once considered to be something very expensive and available only to the largest research centers.
Light, sound, action: Extending the life of acoustic waves on microchips
Data centres and digital information processors are reaching their capacity limits and producing heat.
Filtering out toxic chromium from water
EPFL chemists have developed sponges to capture various target substances, like gold, mercury and lead, dissolved in solution.
Training GPs to identify domestic violence leads to dramatic increase in finding victims
A training programme that teaches GPs how to identify domestic violence and abuse (DVA) victims has led to a 30-fold increase in DVA referrals, according to a collaborative study of 205 general practices led by Queen Mary University of London, in partnership with the Centre for Academic Primary Care, Bristol Medical School.
New genetic markers of type 2 diabetes identified in East Asians
In the largest study of its kind in any non-European population, an international team of researchers, including a University of Massachusetts Amherst genetic epidemiologist, has identified new genetic links with type 2 diabetes among 433,540 East Asian individuals.
Work-related PTSD in nurses
A recent Journal of Clinical Nursing analysis of published studies examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among nurses and identified factors associated with work-related PTSD among nurses.
ESO instrument finds closest black hole to Earth
Astronomers have discovered a black hole lying just 1,000 light-years from Earth.
Be clear, positive, and targeted, to help public stick to social distancing, governments urged
Clear, positive, messaging that is segmented by age, culture, and geography is key to helping the public stick to social distancing measures to stop the spread of COVID-19 infection, say behavioral experts in a commentary accepted for publication in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.
Fatty liver disease is underdiagnosed in the US
According to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is grossly underdiagnosed in the United States.
Real-time visualization of solid-phase ion migration
Researchers from University of science and technology of China has shed new lights on the topic of solid-phase ion migration.
Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde.
Computational imaging benefits from untrained neural network
In a recent study, investigators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences described how they combined an untrained neural network and physics knowledge to eliminate the limitations of deep-learning-based CI methods.
Researchers find certain foods common in diets of US adults with inflammatory bowel disease
Foods, such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks, are commonly found in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues.
Study reveals most critically ill patients with COVID-19 survive with standard treatment
Clinicians from two hospitals in Boston report that the majority of even the sickest patients with COVID-19--those who require ventilators in intensive care units--get better when they receive existing guideline-supported treatment for respiratory failure.
Dual personalities visualized for shape-shifting molecule
Australian and US researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding the structure of a key genetic molecule, called RNA, and revealing for the first time how these changes impact RNA's function.
Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Flight feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky.
Demand for US hospital inpatient, intensive care unit beds for patients with COVID-19
The intensive care unit and inpatient bed needs for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in two cities in China are described and compared to estimate the peak number of intensive care unit beds needed in US cities if an outbreak equivalent to that in Wuhan occurs.
Jurassic Park got it wrong: UW Oshkosh research indicates raptors don't hunt in packs
A new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh analysis of raptor teeth published in the peer-reviewed journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs.
Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers
In an international collaboration led by Lund University in Sweden, researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes.
FSU researchers study Gulf of Mexico in international collaboration
Florida State University and partner universities investigated current baseline conditions in the southern Gulf to create a series of maps and guides that detail the distribution of carbon, nitrogen and the carbon-14 isotope.
Obesity is linked to gut microbiota disturbance, but not among statin-treated individuals
In 2012, the European Union MetaCardis consortium (www.MetaCardis.net), comprising 14 research groups from six European countries with multidisciplinary expertise set out to investigate a potential role of the gut microbiota in the development of cardio-metabolic diseases.
Free and open-source hardware enables more bang for your buck in research funding
A new study uses Finland, and specifically Aalto University, as a model to see how free and open-source hardware (FOSH) can save up to 90% from allocated research funding.
Blood thinners may improve survival among hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Research could change standard of care protocols to prevent clotting associated with coronavirus.
Teen obesity, diabetes or high blood pressure may lead to prematurely aged arteries
Teens who have obesity, type 2 diabetes or high systolic blood pressure show greater signs of blood vessel aging compared to healthy, normal weight teens.
Soil pores hold the key to stability for desert soils
Study shows which desert soils better recover from disturbance.
Cognitive therapy can help treat anxiety in children with autism
Cognitive behavioural therapy and other psychosocial interventions are effective for treating anxiety in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder, according to an analysis of all relevant studies published in 2005-2018.
New rules for the physical basis of cellular organelle composition
New findings about critical cellular structures have upended common assumptions about their formation and composition and provided new insight how molecular machines are built in living cells.
Trial questions benefits of organic nitrates for bone health
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that organic nitrates do not have clinically relevant effects on bone mineral density or bone turnover in postmenopausal women, and the medications caused significant side effects.
Towards antibodies against COVID-19
The lab of Xavier Saelens (VIB-UGent Center for Medical Biotechnology) announces the isolation and characterization of a unique antibody that can bind to the virus that causes COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2).
Sustainable recovery of nutrients from urine
Most ammonia capture is done through the Haber-Bosch (HB) process, an energy-intensive technique used to produce fertilizer that accounts for 1-2% of the world's annual energy consumption.
Investigating the dynamics of stability
Scientists have gained important insight into the mechanisms that drive stability and activity in materials during oxygen evolution reactions.
Pure red LEDs fulfill a primary goal
First high-intensity, low-voltage red LEDs made from nitride semiconductors.
Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse.
DDT, other banned pesticides found in Detroit-area black women: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Environmental Research finds detectable levels of DDE (what DDT becomes when metabolized in the body) and other banned organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the blood of over 60 percent of a cohort of black women of reproductive age in the Detroit area, with higher levels in women who smoked cigarettes daily, drank more alcohol, and drank more water.
Oncotarget: Loss of p16 and high Ki67 labeling index is associated with poor outcome
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 12 reported that the p16 tumor suppressor is coded by CDKN2A and plays an important role during carcinogenesis and tumor progression in numerous tumor entities.
KIST develops large-scale stretchable and transparent electrodes
A Korean research team has developed a large-scale stretchable and transparent electrode for the stretchable display.
Researchers present a microbial strain capable of massive succinic acid production
A research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang-Yup Lee reported the production of a microbial strain capable of the massive production of succinic acid with the highest production efficiency to date.
Study finds stronger links between automation and inequality
A new study co-authored by an MIT economist suggests automation has a bigger impact on the labor market and income inequality than previous research would indicate -- and identifies the year 1987 as a key inflection point in this process, the moment when jobs lost to automation stopped being replaced by an equal number of similar workplace opportunities.
How we might recharge an electric car as it drives
Stanford engineers demonstrate a technology that could one day be scaled up to power a car moving down the road.
Could hotel service robots help the hospitality industry after COVID-19?
A new research study, investigating how service robots in hotels could help redefine leadership and boost the hospitality industry, has taken on new significance in the light of the seismic impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on tourism and business travel.
Division of labour on the surface of bacteria
Bacteria of the species Thermus thermophilus possess two types of extensions on their surface (pili) for the purpose of motion and for capturing and absorbing DNA from their environment.
New research finds racial bias in rideshare platforms
New research to be published in the INFORMS journal Management Science has found popular rideshare platforms exhibit racial and other biases that penalize under-represented minorities and others seeking to use their services.
Study reveals impact of 'soft opt-out' system for organ donation
Research published in Anaesthesia suggests that a 'soft opt-out' system may increase consent rates for organ donation after death, which could boost the number of organs available for transplantation.
Car sharing minus the driver
In 15 years, the share of self-driving passenger vehicles on Moscow's roads will exceed 60%.
Experimental study of how 'metallic glass' forms challenges paradigm in glass research
Unlike in a crystal, the atoms in a metallic glass are not ordered when the liquid solidifies.
Green tea may help with weight loss efforts
In an analysis published in Phytotherapy Research of randomized controlled trials, individuals who consumed green tea experienced a significant decline in body weight and body mass index.
Arctic Edmontosaurus lives again -- a new look at the 'caribou of the Cretaceous'
Published in PLOS ONE today, a study by an international team from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas and Hokkaido University in Japan further explores the proliferation of the most commonly occurring duck-billed dinosaur of the ancient Arctic as the genus Edmontosaurus.
Cancer survivors' experiences with financial toxicity
A recent Psycho-Oncology analysis of published studies found that few cancer survivors received financial information support from healthcare facilities during their initial treatment, even though cancer-related financial toxicity has multiple impacts on survivors' health and quality of life.
Birth and pregnancy experts fail to deliver on contraception advice
Health care professionals who provide contraceptive services outside of general practice are unlikely to discuss long-acting reversible contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants for women without children -- despite their proven safety, effectiveness and convenience.

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