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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 13, 2020


Artificial intelligence helps researchers up-cycle waste carbon
Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency.
Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them.
Pitt researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface.
Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a plant viral protein named 17K that disrupts host cell division to promote its own propagation in infected tissues.
Excess coffee consumption a culprit for poor health
Cappuccino, latte or short black, coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world.
T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed.
US maternal health spending varies by state, driven by cost of childbirth
The average cost of childbirth varies widely from state to state, according to new national analysis from the Health Care Cost Institute, which also found that spending on postpartum care extended across the full year after delivery.
What's Mars made of?
Earth-based experiments on iron-sulfur alloys thought to comprise the core of Mars reveal details about the planet's seismic properties for the first time.
New comet discovered by ESA and NASA solar observatory
In late May and early June, Earthlings may be able to glimpse Comet SWAN.
A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Writing in NanoResearch, a team at UMass Amherst reports that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made.
Room-temperature superionic conduction achieved using pseudorotation of hydride complexes
There is currently a strong demand to replace organic liquid electrolytes used in conventional rechargeable batteries, with solid-state ionic conductors which will enable the batteries to be safer and have higher energy density.
Speeding up long-range coherent LiDAR
LiDAR is a technique used for measuring distances with laser light.
MSK kids study: Children with cancer are not at a higher risk for COVID-19 infection or morbidity
Researches from MSK Kids at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) found that children with cancer are not at a higher risk of being affected by COVID-19.
Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
New research published in the Journal of Consumer Marketing Research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality.
Coordination polymer glass provides solid support for hydrogen fuel cells
Scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) are leading efforts to synthesize stronger and efficient materials for hydrogen fuel cell membranes.
Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
Aerial drone footage provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks using shallow waters as a refuge from a huge predator - the great hammerhead.
New, rapid mechanism for atmospheric particle formation
Carnegie Mellon University researchers working with an international team of scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that allows atmospheric particles to very rapidly form under certain conditions.
Early detection of Alzheimer's disease with dynamic MRI measurement of glucose in brain
Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the most common type of dementia, is not easy for its overlapping signs with normal ageing.
American Journal of Preventive Medicine focuses on critical public health aspects of COVID-19
New research and guidance in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, focus on critical topics pertaining to community and individual health during the COVID-19 epidemic.
Study finds only 3% of individuals with autism receive recommended genetic tests
Tests can identify or rule out abnormalities that could impact clinical care, but a study from the R.I.
How plants forget
New work published in Nature Cell Biology from an international team led by Dr.
Atomically thin magnets for next generation spin and quantum electronics
In 2005, Science asked if it was possible to develop a magnetic semiconductor that could work at room temperature.
Mysterious delta Scuti stars start to surrender secrets
The key to unlocking the secrets of a large group of pulsating stars has been discovered by an international team of astrophysicists.
The makings of a crystal flipper
Hokkaido University scientists have fabricated a crystal that autonomously flips back and forth while changing its flipping patterns in response to lighting conditions.
Twin antibodies show neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified a pair of neutralizing antibodies - isolated from a patient who recovered from COVID-19 - that bind to the glycoprotein spike of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, blocking the spike's ability to bind to the human ACE2 receptor and mediate viral entry into host cells.
Effects of internet CBT for health anxiety on par with face-to-face treatment
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have compared two ways of delivering cognitive behavioral therapy to treat people with health anxiety, a condition that may increase in the wake of COVID-19.
'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703.
'Off-road' mode enables mobile cells to move freely
Cancer cells and leukocytes are able to move through tissue and organs quickly.
Gut ecology
For something that has evolved with us over millions of years, and remains part of our physiology over our entire lives, our gut microbiome, oddly, remains somewhat of a mystery.
Assassin cells armed with anticancer drugs kill cancer masses
POSTECH Professor Won Jong Kim's team uses immunological synapse formation of natural killer cells to treat cancer.
Contrasting trends of PM2.5 and surface ozone in China
In a paper published online in National Science Review, an international team of scientists led by Dr.
Game plan for resumption of sport, exercise after COVID-19 infection
Recommendations for resuming intense exercise training for athletes and highly active people with COVID-19 are discussed.
Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked
A systematic review and meta-analysis that has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease.
X-ray imaging of atomic nuclei
Optically imaging atomic nuclei is a long-sought goal for scientific and applied research, but it has never been realized so far.
Dynamics of gut bacteria follow ecological laws
The fluctuations of gut microbial communities follow ecological principles developed for animals and financial markets, which may help to predict disease biomarkers and effects of unhealthy diets.
Coffee linked to lower body fat in women
Women who drink two or three cups of coffee a day have been found to have lower total body and abdominal fat than those who drink less, according to a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition.
Researchers trace evolution of self-control
Advances in the craftsmanship of stone hand axes around 500,000 years ago suggest individuals at this time possessed characteristics which demonstrate significant self-control, such as concentration and frustration tolerance.
COVID-19 disease map: LCSB researchers coordinate international effort
In the fight against the current pandemic, researchers of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg are coordinating an international collaboration to build a COVID-19 Disease Map: a comprehensive repository incorporating all current knowledge on the virus-host interaction mechanisms.
Malaria vaccine trial samples reveal immune benchmarks for achieving protection
By studying samples from two independent clinical trials of malaria vaccines, Gemma Moncunill and colleagues have linked signatures in the immune system to better vaccine protection from the disease in children and adults.
FSU researchers find even small disturbances can trigger catastrophic storms
Florida State University researchers used numerical models that started with simple conditions to better understand exactly how hurricanes arise.
SARS-CoV-2: A new song recalls an old melody
Important lessons learned from the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2002-2003 could inform and guide vaccine design for COVID-19 according to University of Melbourne Professor Kanta Subbarao, Director of the WHO Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute.
Burning fat with brain-sparing amphetamines without harmful side effects
The team of Ana Domingos, principal investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) and Associate Professor of the University of Oxford, together with Gonçalo Bernardes, principal investigator at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular (IMM) and Reader at the University Cambridge, have modified amphetamine so that does not enter the brain while avoiding its known side effects.
Developing microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) for inoperable cancer
An innovative radiation treatment that could one day be a valuable addition to conventional radiation therapy for inoperable brain and spinal tumors is a step closer, thanks to new research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers at the Canadian Light Source (CLS).
Genes of high temperature superconductivity expressed in 3D materials
High temperature superconductors, in particular, those transition metal based ones, host quasi-two dimensional lattice structures.
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries -- until now.
In France, population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 at about 4.4% in may, modeling suggests
By May 11, when lockdown restrictions were eased in France, about 4.4% of the French population had been infected with SARS-CoV-2, a new modeling study suggests.
COVID-19 in children with cancer in New York
This report assesses the risk associated with COVID-19 for pediatric patients with cancer.
Signs of fetal alcohol syndrome detected in womb
New images reveal the earliest impairments to nonhuman primate fetal brain development due to alcohol ingested by the mother, in a study led by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University involving rhesus macaques.
Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 - 15% of the world population.
Food allergy may be underdiagnosed in children on Medicaid
Prevalence of food allergy among Medicaid-enrolled children across the U.S.
Job skills training leads to long-term reduction in drug abuse
Job skills training for low-income youth does more than just help them get better jobs - it makes them significantly less likely than others to use some illicit drugs, even 16 years later.
Aerobics may be a smart workout for your brain at any age
It's never too late to lace up some sneakers and work up a sweat for brain health, according to a study published in the May 13, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Supercomputing drug screening for deadly heart arrhythmias
First atomistic to tissue multiscale computational pipeline developed for screening drugs for cardiotoxicity.
A disease trigger for pancreatitis has been identified
One factor contributing to the development of pancreatitis lies in mutations within a cell membrane ion channel that is characterized by its specific permeability for calcium ions.
Proper synaptic joint will get you good night's sleep
An IBS research team has reported in vivo findings that a presynaptic cell adhesion molecule named PTPδ is crucial for the development of synapses in the developing brain.
3D VR blood flow to improve cardiovascular care
Biomedical engineers are developing a massive fluid dynamics simulator that can model blood flow through the full human arterial system at subcellular resolution.
Soybean seeding rates and risk
Broad study helps define optimal soybean seeding rates in North America.
US wind plants show relatively low levels of performance decline as they age
Wind plants in the United States remain relatively efficient over time, with only a 13% drop in performance over 17 years, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report in the May 13 issue of the journal Joule.
Missing component of innate immune signaling identified
Giulio Superti-Furga's group at CeMM in partnership with Charles Whitehurst and JangEun Lee's team at Boehringer Ingelheim have identified a new key element of the multi-component machinery responsible for sorting out the nature and severity of the pathogen challenge.
Scientists generate millions of mature human cells in a mouse embryo
A team led by University at Buffalo scientists has developed a method that dramatically ramps up production of mature human cells in mouse embryos.
Early humans in China innovated technology to adapt to climate change 1-million years ago
Yang and colleagues examined archaeological evidence and showed the flexibility of early hominins to ecosystem changes 1.1-1.0 million years ago.
Astronomers find regular rhythms among pulsating stars
Led by University of Sydney astronomer Professor Tim Bedding, astronomers have for the first time detected regular pulsations in a class of stars known as delta Scutis.
Cancer cells deactivate their 'Velcro' to go on the attack
To form metastases, cancer cells must be able to migrate.
Gut microbiome influences ALS outcomes
Harvard University scientists have identified a new gut-brain connection in the neurodegenerative disease ALS.
Molecular signatures can predict the efficacy of malaria vaccines
Molecular signatures before and after immunization can predict vaccine-induced protection, according to a study by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The study analysed the gene expression in peripheral blood cells from individuals immunized with the first malaria vaccine (Mosquirix or RTS,S) and another experimental malaria vaccine.
Technology innovation for neurology
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.
How a mint became catmint
Catmint -- or catnip -- is well-known for its intoxicating effect on cats.
Infecting the mind: Burnout in health care workers during COVID-19
Doctors and nurses across the country are experiencing occupational burnout and fatigue from the increased stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Characteristics, outcomes of heart transplant recipients with COVID-19
The characteristics, treatment and outcomes of heart transplant recipients who were infected with COVID-19 in New York City are described in this case series.
You cannot avoid microplastics
No human being on this earth comes through life without breathing, drinking water and consuming salt.
A deep look into the gut's hormones
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University generated an in-depth description of the human hormone-producing cells of the gut.
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences.
'Pingers' could save porpoises from fishing nets
Underwater sound devices called 'pingers' could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting caught in fishing nets with no negative behavioural effects, newly published research suggests.
California study finds drinking sugary drinks daily may be linked to higher risk of CVD in women
In a study of female California teachers, drinking one or more sugary beverages daily was associated with nearly a 20% higher risk of having cardiovascular disease when compared to those who rarely or never drank sugary beverages.
Effectiveness of programs to enhance aspects of wisdom
This study combined the results of 57 studies with 7,000 participants to examine how effective are interventions and programs to enhance the social, emotional and spiritual aspects of wisdom.
'The head-tail of tadpoles': The dynamics of polymers with a very singular shape
They are in the shape of a tadpole and interact with each other by harpooning between head and tail, thus presenting unexpected physical properties.
Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially.
A CNIO-led European study confirms diabetes type 3c as an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer
Defining risk populations is crucial to be able to carry out diagnostic tests that reveal the presence of the pancreatic as early as possible.
Researchers identify most powerful gene variant for height known to date
Newly discovered gene variant in Peruvian populations is powerfully linked with height.
Secure land rights essential to protect biodiversity and cultures within indigenous lands
New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods.
Strong relationships promote physical activity in older adults
UH researchers found that individual and interpersonal factors had the greatest association with older adults being physically active.
Mucus breakthrough could help patients breathe easy
New insights into the molecular mechanisms driving mucus viscosity were discovered by a Melbourne research team led by Associate Professor Ethan Goddard-Borger from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute.
Significant differences exist among neurons expressing dopamine receptors
An international collaboration, which included the involvement of the research team from the Institut de Neurociències of the UAB (INC-UAB), has shown that neurons expressing dopamine D2 receptors have different molecular features and functions, depending on their anatomical localization within the striatum.
How the body makes triglycerides
Researchers discovered the 3D structure and mode of action of DGAT1, the enzyme that synthesizes triglycerides.
Where neutrinos come from
Russian astrophysicists have come close to solving the mystery of where high-energy neutrinos come from in space.
A new tool to predict delays in post-surgical radiotherapy for head and neck cancer
Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have developed and validated prediction calculators, known as nomograms, to help provide personalized estimates of delayed, non-guideline adherent head and neck cancer care.
NASA finds Vongfong at typhoon strength Philippine warnings up
NASA's Terra satellite revealed powerful storms in Vongfong as it ramped up from a tropical storm to a typhoon.
Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found.
Indicators of infection response do not predict severity of pneumonia in children
Blood biomarkers that reflect the body's response to infection -- including white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin -- are generally not useful in predicting the overall severity of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to a study published in Pediatrics.
T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues.
NMR confirms molecular switches retain function in 2D-array
Researchers led by Jiri Kaleta of IOCB Prague have synthesized regular 2D assemblies of isotopically labelled molecular switches and measured the properties of their isomerization, revealing that formation of such an assembly doesn't hamper the photochemical switching properties of the embedded molecules.
First epigenetic study in 3D human cancer cells
The researcher Manel Esteller performs the first massive epigenetic characterization in organoids or 3D cancer cultures and makes the data available to the research community to facilitate new findings on tumor development and progression.
Study confirms cats can become infected with and may transmit COVID-19 to other cats
In a study published today (May 13, 2020) in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists in the U.S. and Japan report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats.
Reddit reveals peaks of public interest in COVID-19 topics
Online forums can be used by public health officials to quickly identify topics of public interest during the COVID-19 pandemic and to quell misinformation.
How COVID-19 kills
Experts review how the SARS-Cov-2 virus can cause an immune overreaction in the form of potentially lethal cytokine storm.
Chemical composition of bedrock limits vegetation growth in karst regions, research shows
Scientists have revealed the critical role that the chemical composition of bedrock plays in limiting vegetation growth in some of the world's most barren and rocky terrains.
Field study reveals how ammonia isotope molecules diffuse in air
A new study corrects the bias of passive sampler that monitors ammonia and offers a firmer handle on characterizing ammonia sources.
New imaging tool helps researchers see extent of Alzheimer's early damage
New imaging technology allows scientists to see the widespread loss of brain synapses in early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that one day may help aid in drug development, according to a new Yale University study.
Minimum legal age for cannabis use should be 19, study suggests
The optimal minimum legal age for non-medical cannabis use is 19 years of age, according to a study published in BMC Public Health.
School closure during COVID-19 pandemic
 The effectiveness of school closure as a preventive measure during the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed.
Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable.
Misleading information in 1 in 4 most viewed YouTube COVID-19 videos in English
More than one in four of the most viewed COVID-19 videos on YouTube in spoken English contains misleading or inaccurate information, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in BMJ Global Health.
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s.
Low-income children and COVID-19
Hardships faced by low-income children during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed, and educational and policy reforms for the future are suggested in this article.
Trial E3311 validates a less intense treatment for HPV+ throat cancer
A final report of the randomized phase 2 trial E3311 shows transoral robotic surgery followed by low-dose radiation alone is safe in patients with intermediate-risk locally advanced oropharynx cancer.
Randomly selecting leaders could prove to be a remedy for hubris
History shows us that power tends to corrupt; a team of Swiss and German researchers have recently examined historical examples of large-scale business fraud and misconduct at the highest-levels of government in order to highlight how leaders sometimes lose all sense of morality.
New map reveals distrust in health expertise is winning hearts and minds online
Communities on Facebook that distrust establishment health guidance are more effective than government health agencies and other reliable health groups at reaching and engaging 'undecided' individuals, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
EULAR 2020
Breast cancer patients don`t have an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
Scientists successfully develop 'heat resistant' coral to fight bleaching
A team of scientists has successfully produced in a laboratory setting a coral that is more resistant to increased seawater temperatures.
Blockchain: forget the criminal record, it might just save your life -- new study
Blockchain is set to become a friend to consumers, protecting them from tainted food, fake medicine, fraud and products with illegal or unethical origins
NASA's TESS enables breakthrough study of perplexing stellar pulsations
Astronomers have detected elusive pulsation patterns in dozens of young, rapidly rotating stars thanks to data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).
Fine particulate matter may increase mortality among young patients with certain cancers
An analysis of nearly 16,000 young patients with cancer in Utah revealed that exposure to fine particulate matter was associated with increased mortality at five and 10 years after diagnosis of certain cancers.
Asymmetric iodoesterification of simple alkenes by concerto catalyst
Japanese researchers have succeeded in catalytic asymmetric iodoesterification from simple alkene substrates and carboxylic acids.
New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg--with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy.
Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria.
Prevalence of benign gynecologic lesions higher than previously reported
Over the last decade researchers have become concerned about a possible link between a benign gynecologic lesion called endosalpingiosis (ES) and ovarian cancer.
Humpback whales may risk collision with vessels in the Magellan Strait
By tagging and tracking migrating humpback whales that feed in the Magellan Strait in Chile, the scientists were able to provide policy recommendations to reduce the risk of collisions.
How blocking iron drives the lung immune system to control infection
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital, Dublin have discovered how the iron chelator, DFX, which functions by attaching to iron, drives the immune system to deal with tuberculosis (TB).
Genetic testing among individuals with ASD
Professional medical societies recommend certain genetic tests for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Investigating associations of common medical conditions, alcohol use
The association between 26 common medical conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure and levels of use of alcohol was investigated with data from electronic health records of 2.7 million primary care patients.
Tiny RNA that should attack coronavirus diminish with age, disease
A group of tiny RNA that should attack the virus causing COVID-19 when it tries to infect the body are diminished with age and chronic health problems, a decrease that likely helps explain why older individuals and those with preexisting medical conditions are vulnerable populations, investigators report.
In victory over polio, hope for the battle against COVID-19
Medicine's great triumph over polio holds out hope we can do the same for COVID-19, two researchers say.
Organic small molecule hole-transporting layers toward efficient p-i-n perovskite solar cells
Researchers proposed a concept for designing small-molecule HTL materials with supramolecular interactions and inverse diffusion properties.
Color of cells a 'thermometer' for molecular imbalance, study finds
Non-invasive color analysis of cells could one day be used in diagnostics, a proof-of-concept study has shown.
Uncovering how 'dark matter' regions of the genome affect inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at the Babraham Institute in collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute has uncovered how variations in a non-protein coding 'dark matter' region of the genome could make patients susceptible to complex autoimmune and allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease.
Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise.
Yale researchers discover how HIV hides from treatment
Even after successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV can hide dormant in a tiny number of immune system cells for decades and re-emerge to threaten the life of its host.
SHEA helps hospitals navigate legal aspects of antibiotic
The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today released a white paper outlining strategies for documenting the recommendations of antibiotic stewardship programs (ASP) and clarifying the stewardship team's role in patient care from a legal and quality improvement standpoint.
Designing flexible and stretchable single crystal electronic systems
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with a Purdue team have discovered that certain crystals are more flexible and stretchable compared to current materials used for electronic applications.
Evidence suggests a small but important number of people will develop coronavirus-related psychosis
The review, published online ahead of print in Schizophrenia Research, found an increase in the prevalence of psychosis as a result of COVID-19 would likely be associated with viral exposure, pre-existing vulnerability and psychosocial stress.
Noble metal aerogels enabled by freezing
TU Dresden chemists developed a freeze-thaw method, capable of synthesising various noble metal aerogels (NMAs) with clean surfaces and multiscale structure.
The Lancet: COVID-19 may be linked to rare inflammatory disorder in young children, first detailed reports on 10 patients from Italy suggests
Doctors in the Bergamo province of Italy [1] have described a series of ten cases of young children with symptoms similar to a rare inflammatory disease called Kawasaki Disease appearing since the COVID-19 pandemic arose in the Lombardy region of Northern Italy, in a report published today in The Lancet.
ECOG-ACRIN research at ASCO 2020
Researchers with the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group will present a wide range of research findings at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), occurring virtually May 29-31.

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