Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 14, 2020
Washington Post's depictions of autism shift from 'cause and cure' to acceptance
The Washington Post's depiction of autism has shifted over the years from a focus on 'cause and cure' toward one of acceptance and accommodation, say the authors of a study that examined 315 articles published from 2007 to 2017.

'Cell pores' discovery gives hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients
Scientists have discovered a new treatment to dramatically reduce swelling after brain and spinal cord injuries, offering hope to 75 million victims worldwide each year.

Malaria parasite ticks to its own internal clock
Researchers have long known that all of the millions of malaria parasites within an infected person's body move through their cell cycle at the same time.

Local inflammatory cells are characteristic for advanced multiple sclerosis
In the brains of people that suffer from long-term multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammatory cells are not entering the brain via the bloodstream anymore.

Using blockchain technology to promote fair and timely outbreak research cooperation
In a Policy Forum, Mark van der Waal and colleagues illustrate how blockchain technology could be used to alleviate the systemic barriers that hinder cooperative research and development required to rapidly respond to imminent pathogenic threats like the current global COVID-19 pandemic.

Examining association between weight loss before bariatric surgery, risk of death after surgery
Researchers looked at whether a patient's body weight and weight loss before bariatric surgery were associated with risk of death within 30 days after surgery using data from nearly 500,000 patients in the US and Canada.

How interstitial ordering affects high-strength steels
The performance of materials is strongly influenced by their alloying elements: Adding elements beyond the basic composition of the alloy can strongly influence the properties and performance of it.

Satellites eye typhoon Vongfong landfall in the Philippines
NASA and NOAA satellites have been providing forecasters with satellite data that showed the strength and extent of Typhoon Vongfong as it made landfall in the Philippines and continued to track through the country.

Fighting the COVID-19 pandemic and major diseases at the same time
Researchers, politicians and funding bodies find themselves in front of a unique situation: The mounting pressure to accelerate and intensify efforts to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while handling the growing threat from all other diseases endangering our society.

Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.

Safety of bioabsorbable polymer against durable polymer DES in high-risk PCI patients
A novel study sought to reveal whether drug-eluting stents (DES) coated with bioabsorbable polymer (BP) presented a safety advantage without compromising efficacy compared to durable polymer (DP) formulations.

Precision medicine guides choice of better drug therapy in severe heart disease
Is personalized medicine cost-effective? Researchers have answered that question for one medical treatment, genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndrome patients with PCI.

SCAI releases official position statement on optimal percutaneous interventional therapy for complex coronary artery disease
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has published a position statement addressing optimal percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment of patients with complex coronary artery disease (CAD).

SCAI issues device selection guidelines for aorto-iliac arterial interventions
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released guidelines that provide a comprehensive review of comparative effectiveness data for devices used in aorto-iliac arterial interventions.

Answers to these questions can help #Decision2020 build momentum for Americans as we age
With primary and general elections on the horizon across the US, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today released a series of high-priority questions for candidates.

Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines.

Sainsbury Wellcome Center researchers find mouse and human eye movements share important similarity
In a study published today in Current Biology, Arne Meyer, John O'Keefe and Jasper Poort used a lightweight eye-tracking system composed of miniature video cameras and motion sensors to record head and eye movements in mice without restricting movement or behavior.

Compact electronic nose to identify human lung diseases
Researchers from Russia and Italy have proposed a compact sensor system that can implement the functionality of the electronic nose and developed a reproducible technology for its manufacture.

TRAPPIST-1 planetary orbits not misaligned
Astronomers using the Subaru Telescope have determined that the Earth-like planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are not significantly misaligned with the rotation of the star.

Surrey unveils fast-charging super-capacitor technology
Experts from the University of Surrey believe their dream of clean energy storage is a step closer after they unveiled their ground-breaking super-capacitor technology that is able to store and deliver electricity at high power rates, particularly for mobile applications.

Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks,

Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Professor FU Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Further evidence does not support hydroxychloroquine for patients with COVID-19
The anti-inflammatory drug hydroxychloroquine does not significantly reduce admission to intensive care or death in patients hospitalized with pneumonia due to COVID-19, finds a study from France published by The BMJ today.

Persistence of forages is dependent on harvest intervals
Research investigates effects of harvest intervals on alfalfa in southeastern United States.

Retinal texture could provide early biomarker of Alzheimer's disease
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a new imaging device capable of measuring both the thickness and texture of the various layers of the retina.

Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond.

Researchers find one-two punch may help fight against Salmonella
Researchers found that dephostatin does not kill Salmonella or stop it from growing.

UMD researchers seek to reduce food waste and establish the science of food date labeling
Minimizing food waste is top of mind right now during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Moffitt Cancer Center study suggests more could benefit from CAR T-cell therapy
Moffitt Cancer Center organized a consortium of 16 cancer treatment facilities across the US that offer Yescarta as a standard-of-care therapy for patients with relapsed/refractory large B cell lymphoma.

Moffitt researchers develop model to predict prostate cancer aggressiveness
Researchers in the Center of Excellence for Evolutionary Therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center want to better understand what is happening in the tumor microenvironment to drive prostate cancer to become aggressive and grow rapidly.

Repurposed drug helps obese mice lose weight, improve metabolic function
An off-label experiment in mice using disulfiram, which has been used to treat alcohol use disorder for more than 50 years, consistently normalized body weight and reversed metabolic damage in obese middle-aged mice of both sexes.

Nutrimedia, a resource that assesses the veracity of messages about food and nutrition
The journal PLOS ONE has published an article that explains the methodology used by Nutrimedia to assess the veracity of messages about nutrition.

University of Minnesota researchers study radiation resistance in brain cancer cells
In a vertical climb to avoid collision with a towering mountain, a plane ejects cargo to gain altitude.

New research into stem cell mutations could improve regenerative medicine
Research from the University of Sheffield has given new insight into the cause of mutations in pluripotent stem cells and potential ways of stopping these mutations from occurring.

Simple text reminders do not improve breast cancer hormone therapy adherence
Text message reminders are not a silver bullet when it comes to overcoming the long-standing challenge of ensuring that breast cancer patients continue to take aromatase inhibitors, pills to treat hormone-sensitive cancers that are prescribed for as long as five years.

Malaria runs like clockwork; so does the parasite that causes the disease
A new study uncovers evidence that an intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, suggesting parasites have evolved mechanisms to precisely maintain periodicity.

Catnip's chemical attractant is new twist on old family tradition
Catnip is most famous for its ability to launch felines into a euphoric frenzy, but the origin of its cat-attracting chemical is a remarkable example of evolutionary innovation.

Groundbreaking telemedicine-based network offers remote guidance to 100 million STEMI patients
A novel, groundbreaking trial recently examined the viability of telemedicine for remote guidance of a population-based ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) program reaching more than 100 million patients.

Digital health in the COVID-19 pandemic
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, and other key digital technology applications will play a vital role addressing the new healthcare challenges triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity
A 2D platform of molybdenum, sulfur and selenium is adept at detecting biomolecules via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

Molecular imaging offers insight into therapy outcomes for neuroendocrine tumor patients
A new proof-of-concept study published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine has demonstrated that molecular imaging can be used for identifying early response to 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumor patients.

Archaeology: Fossilized footprints suggest ancient humans divided labor
The largest collection of footprints from the human fossil record in Africa is described in Scientific Reports this week.

Scientists report on crucial reduction of Indian lion genome diversity
Scientists analyzed the genomes of extinct and living lions. They managed to determine when the divergence took place, as well as come to several other conclusions on genetic diversity of the modern lion population in India.

Army researchers develop new ways to nudge the brain
For Army scientists, the goal of neuroscience research is pursuing the inner workings of the human brain to advance scientific understanding and improve Soldier performance.

Tracking an organism's development, cell by cell
Scientists have devised a mouse model that lets researchers track every cell in the body, from the embryonic stage until adulthood.

Ticking time bomb: Malaria parasite has its own inherent clock
The activity of the parasite that causes malaria is driven by the parasite's own inherent clock, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests.

SCAI issues position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ambulatory surgical centers
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) today issued a position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs).

CFC replacements are a source of persistent organic pollution in the Arctic
Substances used to replace ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) may be just as problematic as their predecessors, a new study shows.

Scientists develop tool to sequence circular DNA
University of Alberta biologists have invented a new way for sequencing circular DNA, according to a new study.

Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast.

Researchers reveal largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth--Pūhāhonu, a volcano within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

'Lean lab' approach enables quick research ramp down
MIT Assistant Professor Canan Dagdeviren runs her Conformable Decoders Group at the Media Lab using ''lean lab'' management principles, with benefits that include cost savings, increased productivity, and a strong safety record.

Scientists develop noninvasive ultrasound neuromodulation technique
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a noninvasive ultrasound neuromodulation technique, which could potentially modulate neuronal excitability without any harm in the brain.

How range residency and long-range perception change encounter rates
The movement of animals has effects that reverberate throughout the biosphere.

SCAI issues expert consensus on managing patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released an expert consensus statement describing recommendations for the management of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

Genetic origins of hybrid dysfunction
Evolutionary biologists studying populations of hybrid fish have found two genes that contribute to melanoma - only the second time people have identified specific genes associated with dysfunction in hybrid vertebrates.

Electrolysis: Chemists have discovered how to produce better electrodes
Another step forward for renewable energies: The production of green hydrogen could be even more efficient in the future.

Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher.

Danish researchers find new breast cancer gene in young people
New research shows for the first time that RBBP8 gene variants may lead to the development of breast cancer in very young women.

Research shows fungicides effective in fighting Fusarium wilt of watermelon
Fusarium wilt is one of the most economically important diseases of watermelon and a major problem to growers worldwide.

COVID-19: Hospital response risks worsening health inequalities
Disadvantaged and marginalized people face worsening health inequalities as a result of the difficult choices made by NHS hospitals in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Frankfurt researchers discover potential targets for COVID-19 therapy
A team of biochemists and virologists at Goethe University and the Frankfurt University Hospital were able to observe how human cells change upon infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 in people.

Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing.

Critical window for re-infection with HIV after stem cell transplantation
So far, allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of severe blood cancers has been the only medical intervention to have cured at least three people infected with the HI virus.

Seeing the universe through new lenses
A new study by an international team of scientists revealed hundreds of new strong gravitational lensing candidates based on a deep dive into data collected for a US Department of Energy-supported telescope project in Arizona called the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument.

New algorithm predicts optimal materials among all possible compounds
Skoltech researchers have offered a solution to the problem of searching for materials with required properties among all possible combinations of chemical elements.

Social good creates economic boost
As unemployment rates skyrocket around the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a world-first study out of Australia and Sweden has found social venture start-ups not only alleviate social problems but are also much more important for job creation than previously thought.

'Vibrant' cardiothoracic surgery specialty faces considerable challenges head-on
Heart and lung surgeons are fully aware of the difficulties that exist in the intensely demanding and competitive specialty of cardiothoracic surgery; even still, they report being extremely satisfied with their jobs -- more so than ever before.

The cardiac depressant factor DPP3 is predicting organ failure in burn patients
High DPP3 blood concentrations are indicating multiple organ failure and poor outcomes. sphingotec commercializes a rapid CE-IVD test for DPP3 on its proprietary point-of-care platform Nexus IB10.

Cutting-edge imaging may provide insight into the functional significance of a stenosis
A novel study aims to evaluate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters may predict fractional flow reserve (FFR) values and assess if OCT parameters may predict clinical outcome in patients with negative FFR.

Assessment of deaths from COVID-19, seasonal influenza
Publicly available data were used to analyze the number of deaths from seasonal influenza deaths compared with deaths from COVID-19.

NASA's ICESat-2 measures arctic ocean's sea ice thickness, snow cover
Arctic sea ice helps keep Earth cool, as its bright surface reflects the Sun's energy back into space.

Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still debated.

Chest X-rays in emergency rooms can help predict severity of COVID-19 in young and middle-aged adults
Patterns seen may help quickly identify high-risk patients and prompt more aggressive treatment

Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials
A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab has observed unusually long-lived wavelike electrons called 'plasmons' in a new class of electronically conducting material.

New Chicago Booth research suggests patients prefer expert guidance for medical decisions
New research from University of Chicago Booth School of Business suggests that in times of uncertainty, people want expert guidance when making choices about their medical care.

Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological.

Tiny pop-up devices work relentlessly, even under extreme pressure
Miniature devices, notably those that bulge out from 2D surfaces like pop-up greeting cards, have seamlessly found their way into pressure-sensing and energy-harvesting technologies because of their ability to be frequently stretched, compressed or twisted.

The revolt of the plants: The arctic melts when plants stop breathing
A joint research team from POSTECH and the University of Zurich identifies a physiologic mechanism in vegetation as cause for Artic warming.

Can COVID-19 spread through fecal matter?
Early studies show evidence of COVID-19 genetic material in fecal matter, but more work is needed to determine if the virus can be spread through stool, according to a new review paper from a Rice University epidemiologist.

COVID-19 and terrorism: Assessing the short and long-term impacts of terrorism
A new report authored by Pool Re and Cranfield University's Andrew Silke, Professor of Terrorism, Risk and Resilience, reveals how the COVID-19 pandemic is already having a significant impact on terrorism around the world.

How particulate matter arises from pollutant gases
When winter smog takes over Asian mega-cities, more particulate matter is measured in the streets than expected.

New evidence suggests malaria cycles are innate to the organism
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined partners to publish a study providing clear evidence that malaria's characteristic cycle of fever and chills is a result of the parasite's own influence -- not factors from the host.

Detailed analysis of immune response to SARS-CoV-2 bodes well for COVID-19 vaccine
A new study documents a robust antiviral immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in a group of 20 adults who had recovered from COVID-19.

Researchers reveal common origin of fermi bubbles and galactic center x-ray outflows
Recently, researchers at the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory have presented a new model that for the first time simultaneously explains the origins of both the Fermi bubbles and the Galactic center biconical X-ray structure, which was discovered in 2003.

Latin America's livestock sector needs emissions reduction to meet 2030 targets
Reducing livestock's carbon footprint in Latin America is necessary if countries in the region are to meet emission reduction goals under the Paris Agreement, researchers argue in a new analysis published May 14 in Frontiers.

Icosapent ethyl found to significantly reduce revascularizations in statin patients
Patients with high lipid levels have an increased risk for ischemic events, despite statin therapy.

Global spread of the multi-resistant pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
An international consortium found a remarkable global spread of strains of a multi-resistant bacterium that can cause severe infections - Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

Study identifies group of genes with altered expression in autism
The dysregulation appeared to affect communication among neurons in the subjects of the study, which was conducted in Brazil.

Metagenomics reveals distinct microbiotypes in the giant clams Tridacna maxima
New research conducted at CRIOBE and ENTROPIE research units, with the collaboration of the Swire institute of Marine Science of The University of Hong Kong, The Cawthron Institute and James Cook University, highlights the impacts of benthic species assemblages on the giant clams Tridacna maxima.

The carnivorous plant lifestyle is gene costly
The genomes of three carnivorous plants -- the Venus flytrap, spoon-leaved sundew and the waterwheel plant -- have been decoded.

Gaps in international law impede pandemic research
The global COVID-19 pandemic reveals gaps in international law that can inhibit the sharing of scientific information, biological samples and genetic sequence data (GSD) crucial to the timely development of diagnostics, antiviral treatments and vaccines to address novel viral threats.

AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
Researchers have developed an AI algorithm that can detect and identify different types of brain injuries.

'Metabolic signature' can determine adherence to Mediterranean diet, help predict CVD risk
A newly identified 'metabolic signature' can evaluate an individual's adherence and metabolic response to the Mediterranean diet and help predict future risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Topological waves may help in understanding plasma systems
A research team has predicted the presence of 'topologically protected' electromagnetic waves that propagate on the surface of plasmas, which may help in designing new plasma systems like fusion reactors.

Duality Technologies researchers accelerate privacy-enhanced collaboration on genomic data
Duality Technologies Researchers Accelerate Privacy-Enhanced Collaboration on Genomic Data - with Significant Implications for COVID-19 Research.

Bike commuting accelerated when bike-share systems rolled into town
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in cities where bike-share systems have been introduced, bike commuting increased by 20%, according to a new UW study.

Cell therapy treatment for cardiac patients with microvascular dysfunction provides enhanced quality
Trial results presented today revealed a promising therapy for patients experiencing angina due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD).

Cancer cells' growth amid crowding reveals nuanced role for known oncogene
A hallmark of cancer cells is that they lack contact inhibition, even when crowded.

The exposome: When our environment drives health and disease
Science has published in its latest issue two papers by Associate Professor Emma Schymanski, whose team develops methods to identify unknown chemicals and their effects on health and disease.

Arthritis drug may improve respiratory function in some patients with severe COVID-19
A small study in Greece found that the clinically approved anti-inflammatory drug anakinra, used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, improved respiratory function in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

K-State infectious disease scientist offers road map for future COVID-19 research
A Kansas State University infectious disease scientist and collaborators are offering a possible research road map to find the answers to COVID-19 questions.

Type 2 diabetes linked to worse cognitive performance after a stroke; prediabetes not linked, but prevention needed
An analysis of seven international studies found people with Type 2 diabetes, but not those with prediabetes, had worse cognitive function three to six months after a stroke.

Patients prefer their consent to share their data and to manage it digitally
Patients with diabetes often have to see many different stakeholders who each specialize in different aspects of their treatment.

First-of-its-kind-study reveals that eating prior to cardiac catheterization is non-inferior to fast
Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are traditionally instructed to follow nothing by mouth, or nil per os (NPO), as there are no current standardized fasting protocols.

Dynamic stimulation of the visual cortex allows blind and sighted people to 'see' shapes
In a paper publishing in the journal Cell on May 14, a team of investigators at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston describe an approach in which implanted electrodes are stimulated in a dynamic sequence, essentially 'tracing' shapes on the surface of the visual cortex that participants were able to 'see.'

General descriptor sparks advancements in dye chemistry
SUTD collaborates with international researchers to move away from inefficient trial-and-error developments in dye chemistry and quantitatively design luminescent materials.

Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease
An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effect in progressive muscle disease.

Association of dementia, poor vision in older adults with limits in daily functioning
This study used survey responses from 7,000 adults to examine what limitations on self-care, mobility and household activities occurred among adults 65 and older with dementia and impaired vision.

Geography of childhood cancer in Switzerland studied
A research group under the direction of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University Bern has investigated the spatial distribution of childhood cancer risks in Switzerland for the period 1985-2015.

Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips -- rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops -- offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection risk.

Is the simplest chemical reaction really that simple?
New research by scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has shown, surprisingly, in the simplest, well-studied reaction, there is still uncovered mechanism.

Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
Today Boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region.

Clever new robot rover design conquers sand traps
Built with wheeled appendages that can be lifted, a new robot developed at Georgia Tech with US Army funding has complex locomotion techniques robust enough to allow it to climb sand covered hills and avoid getting stuck.

New functions of a protein may improve biocontrol methods in sustainable agriculture
The laboratory of the UMA 'BacBio' has proved that Bacillus subtilis cells, when deprived of an amyloid protein (TasA), exhibit a range of cytological anomalies and dysfunctions leading to their premature death.

IU School of Medicine study tracks COVID-19 spread in pediatric dialysis unit
As COVID-19 continues its sweep around the globe, dialysis units have continued to be hotspots for the virus' spread.

Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events.

MU Health Care neurologist publishes guidance related to COVID-19 and stroke care
A University of Missouri Health Care neurologist has published more than 40 new recommendations for evaluating and treating stroke patients based on international research examining the link between stroke and novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

New approach to design functional antibodies for precision vaccines
A new approach to de novo protein design dubbed 'TopoBuilder' allows researchers to develop complex antigens that, when used in vaccines, elicit antibody responses that target the weaknesses in some of the most intractable viral pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

How cells decide the way they want to recycle their content
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a new phosphorylation site of Ulk1 as a novel regulating mechanism of alternative autophagy.

COVID-19 death counts 'substantial underestimation' of actual deaths for some Italian regions
Official COVID-19 death counts are likely to be a 'substantial underestimation' of the actual number of deaths from the disease, at least for some Italian regions, concludes a study published by The BMJ today.

A lost world and extinct ecosystem
The field study site of Pinnacle Point, South Africa, sits at the center of the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons, and the first use of foods from the sea, both geographically and scientifically, having contributed much on the evolutionary road to being a modern human.

Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Ozone-depleting chemical alternatives getting into our food and water
An international environmental agreement to regulate the use of chemicals depleting the ozone layer may have inadvertently allowed higher levels of other harmful chemicals to flourish, new research co-led by York University and Environment and Climate Change Canada has found.

Ancient DNA reveals genetic history of China
An analysis of 26 newly sequenced ancient genomes from across China helps to fill crucial gaps in the poorly known genetic history of East Asia, including to reveal one major episode of admixture.

Online exercise advice rarely aligns with national physical activity guidelines
Whether for convenience, cost or comfort, many people look to online resources for fitness and exercise information -- especially when faced with fitness center and gym closures during the COVID-19 pandemic.

ACMG updates seminal laboratory standard on CFTR variant testing
This technical standard includes revised information about CF and the CFTR gene, new testing considerations and methodologies, and updated recommendations for the interpretation and reporting of test results.

Discovery of malaria parasite's clock could pave way to new treatments
The parasite that causes malaria has its own internal clock, explaining the disease's rhythmic fevers and opening new pathways for therapeutics.

Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats.

Study: Multiscale crop modeling effort required to assess climate change adaptation
Crop modeling is essential for understanding how to secure the food supply as the planet adapts to climate change.

The newly emerged coronavirus did not spill over from scaly anteaters
Mammals known as scaly anteaters are natural hosts of coronaviruses, but are not likely the direct source of the recent outbreak in humans, according to a study published May 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jinping Chen of the Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, and colleagues.

Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.