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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 17, 2020


Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil.
A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Researchers with the School of Electrical Engineering at KAIST have developed a new approach to the underlying physics of semiconductors.
Tobacco companies minting it before Wednesday's UK menthol cigarette ban
Three days before menthol cigarettes are banned in the UK, new research highlights a sharp rise in their market share and extensive tobacco industry efforts to undermine legislation.
Discovery of high-Chern-number and high-temperature Chern insulator states: to information highway
One of the most important issues in physical science and low-consumption electronics is how to realize multiple dissipationless edge channels (high Chern number) and increase the working temperature in Chern insulators.
Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle.
Stitching together the structure of the DNA replication toolbelt
Structural details of an enzyme complex shed light on DNA replication.
New ECU research finds 'Dr. Google' is almost always wrong
Many people turn to 'Dr. Google' to self-diagnose their health symptoms and seek medical advice, but online symptom checkers are only accurate about a third of the time, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research published in the Medical Journal of Australia today.

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