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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 18, 2020


Cancer researchers locate drivers of tumor resistance
How do tumors change their behavior and resist anticancer therapies?
Not all multiple sclerosis-like diseases are alike
Scientists say some myelin-damaging disorders have a distinctive pathology that groups them into a unique disease entity.
A new tool to map the flow of info within living cells
UNC-Chapel Hill, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers created a way to study the intricacies of intercellular signaling -- when, where, and how tiny parts of cells communicate -- to make cells move.
Double helix of masonry -- Researchers discover the secret of Italian renaissance domes
University of Bergamo and Princeton University researchers found that the masonry of Italian renaissance domes, such as the duomo in Florence, use a double-helix structure that is self-supporting during and after construction.
Formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide to formic acid
The group clarified for the first time whether formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide, biocarbonate ion, or carbonate ion to formic acid.
Penn engineers develop first tunable, chip-based 'vortex microlaser' and detector
To break through a looming bandwidth bottleneck, engineers are exploring some of light's harder-to-control properties.
New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
To conduct his analysis, Kipping used the chronology of the earliest evidence for life and the evolution of humanity.
Coronavirus infections may lead to delirium and potentially PTSD
People taken ill by coronavirus infections may experience psychiatric problems while hospitalized and potentially after they recover, suggests an analysis of past research led by the UCL Institute of Mental Health with King's College London collaborators, published in The Lancet Psychiatry.
New article in Pediatric Research: A roadmap for critical COVID-19 research in children
Increasing reports of severe COVID-19 illness in children -- coupled with the fact that little is known about how and why the disease may behave differently in this younger population -- demand that a set of critical steps be taken now to ensure children get the attention they need, according to an article just published in Pediatric Research.
Technology makes tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
By making brain and other tissues reversibly stretchable or compressible, a new MIT-developed technology called 'ELAST' allows labeling probes to infuse more quickly.
Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research.
Climate change threatens progress in cancer control
Climate change threatens prospects for further progress in cancer prevention and control, increasing exposure to cancer risk factors and impacting access to cancer care, according to a new commentary by scientists from the American Cancer Society and Harvard T.
Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it.
Ambitious EU climate efforts could increase emissions in the rest of the world
The more the EU economy succeeds in dialing down greenhouse gas emissions, the more the rest of the world will turn them up -- unless a similar level of green ambitions is shared by others.
New study sheds light on IBD patients with COVID
The researchers conclude that increasing age, comorbidities, and corticosteroids are associated with severe COVID-19 among IBD patients.
Maintaining heart health may protect against cognitive decline
People with a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease have increased cognitive decline, including an increase in typical markers of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that monitoring and controlling for heart disease may be key to maintaining and improving cognitive health later in life, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Early visual experience drives precise alignment of cortical networks for binocular vision
Researchers identify three distinct cortical representations that develop independent of visual experience but undergo experience-dependent reshaping, an essential part of cortical network alignment and maturation.
CU researchers publish study on nerve cell repair in Nature Neuroscience
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified a new way that cells in the central nervous system regenerate and repair following damage.
Local climate unlikely to drive the early COVID-19 pandemic
Princeton researchers report in the journal Science that the number of people still vulnerable to COVID-19 and the speed at which the disease spreads means that local climate conditions are not likely to dominate the first wave of the pandemic.
Lighting up cells with genetically-encoded X-ray-sensitive probes
Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy provides a unique approach for direct imaging a whole cell with its intrinsic nanoscale resolution.
BrainHealth Research advances understanding of differences in effects of cannabis use
Center for BrainHealth published findings underscoring differences between men and women's craving or desire to consume cannabis when exposed to a specific situation.
Theory of detonation-driven hypervelocity shock tunnels and its demonstration
The hypersonic ground testing is a critical issue for hypersonics.
Urban heat waves imperil LA's most vulnerable communities
Some of LA's most disadvantaged communities are vulnerable to extreme heat waves, which are increasingly common due to global warming.
Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict -- including a swastika symbol -- discovered in Aboriginal rock art.
US inroads to better Ebola vaccine
As the world focuses on finding a COVID-19 vaccine, research continues on other potentially catastrophic pandemic diseases, including Ebola and Marburg viruses.
Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' -- When materials differentiate between past and future
Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors.
Climate change will bring bigger swings in European summer temperatures
Global average temperatures are set to increase under climate change, but temperature deviations in relation to this average will not be affected in the same way.
South asia faces increased threat of extreme heat, extreme pollution, study shows
Scientists know that extreme heat has a negative impact on the human body -- causing distress in the respiratory and cardiovascular systems -- and they know that extreme air pollution can also have serious effects.
When a spinning toy meets hydrodynamics: Point-of-care technology is set in motion
An IBS research team has reported a diagnostic fidget spinner (Dx-FS) that allows for highly sensitive and rapid diagnosis and prescription only with hand power.
A new look into the sources and impacts of greenhouse gases in China
Special issue of Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reveals new findings on China's GHG emissions and documents changes in local and regional environments.
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher.
AI unlocks rhythms of 'deep sleep'
Algorithms and deep learning has enabled Flinders University sleep researchers to dive deep into one of the mysteries of sleep health.
UCLA physicists develop world's best quantum bits
A team of researchers at UCLA has set a new record for preparing and measuring the quantum bits, or qubits, inside of a quantum computer without error.
Mussel reefs heighten risk of microplastic exposure and consumption
In the first study of its kind, scientists found that when mussels were clumped together forming reefs -- as they do in nature -- the reef structure resulted in a three-fold rise in the amount of ingested plastic.
Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals.
Northern Italy -- Official COVID-19 deaths underestimate the full impact of the pandemic
According to a study by Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the northern Italian city of Nembro recorded more deaths during March 2020 than between January and December 2019.
New study projects ocean warming impact on Antarctic krill
Ocean warming is likely to alter the distribution and lifecycle of ecologically and commercially important Antarctic krill over the rest of this century, according to new IMAS-led research.
New and diverse experiences linked to enhanced happiness, new study shows
New and diverse experiences are linked to enhanced happiness, and this relationship is associated with greater correlation of brain activity, new research has found.
Jurassic stick insect performed mimicry to defend against predators
Yang et al. reported the earliest mimetic and defensive strategies of a stick insect from the Middle Jurassic of China, Aclistophasma echinulatum gen. et sp. nov., exquisitely preserving abdominal extensions and femoral spines.
Mindfulness training shows promise for people with MS
New research suggests mindfulness training may help multiple sclerosis patients in two very different ways: regulating negative emotions and improving processing speed.
Probing materials at deep-Earth conditions to decipher Earth's evolutionary tale
Scientists have developed a way to study liquid silicates at the extreme conditions found in the core-mantle boundary.
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations.
PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors treatment in lung cancer: Brightness and challenge
Immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have made a significant impact on the outcomes of lung cancer patients.
Should schools go screen-free
A new paper in JAMA Network Open found that most middle and high schools have cell phone use policies, mostly restricting use in classrooms but not during lunch/recess.
Physicists have developed a sensor that can be used in both industry and biomedicine
Magnetic field sensors are largely used in industry, medicine, as well as in applied and fundamental physics.
A deeper connection to hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
EPFL scientists have uncovered the molecular biology behind Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome, a severe genetic disease.
Notorious cancer protein mutations cooperate to proliferate disease
Research at Kanazawa University, Theragen Etex Bio Institute and Seoul National University as reported in Nature Communications points towards pathways for the metastasis and malignant transitions that result from changes in the protein p53.
Genome study links DNA changes to the risks of specific breast cancer subtypes
An analysis of genetic studies covering 266,000 women has revealed 32 new sites on the human genome where variations in DNA appear to alter the risks of getting breast cancer.
Scientists find brain center that 'profoundly' shuts down pain
A Duke University research team has found a small area of the brain in mice that can profoundly control the animals' sense of pain.
Smokers more likely to express ACE2 protein that SARS-COV-2 uses to enter human cells
Previous data from COVID-19 patients suggests that cigarette smokers are more likely to have health complications.
Location, location, location: The cell membrane facilitates RAS protein interactions
Many cancer medications fail to effectively target the most commonly mutated cancer genes in humans, called RAS.
Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
US and German physicists have found surprising evidence of a link between the 2D quantum Hall effect and 3D topological materials that could be used in quantum computing.
New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behavior in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans.
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places.
Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
University of Iowa biologists have learned animals can alert future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born.
Scientists discover mutation that enhances plant defense
Sometimes scientists begin research and find exactly what they expected.
Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water.
Study finds that aging neurons accumulate DNA damage
MIT neuroscientists have discovered that an enzyme called HDAC1 is critical for repairing age-related DNA damage to genes involved in memory and other cognitive functions.
Factors associated with firearm suicide risk
Researchers compared the risk of suicide by firearm based on sociodemographic characteristics of US adults.
Riddled with holes: Making flexible thin-film electronics more durable
Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology develop a simple approach for controlling the otherwise random formation of cracks in flexible thin-film conductors, greatly increasing the durability of flexible electrodes and transistors against bending and folding.
Machine that oxygenates blood may help critically ill COVID-19 patients, according to WVU study
Sometimes the lung function of COVID-19 patients deteriorates so much that even ventilators can't save them.
Exoplanet climate 'decoder' aids search for life
After examining a dozen types of suns and a roster of planet surfaces, Cornell University astronomers have developed a practical model - an environmental color ''decoder'' - to tease out climate clues for potentially habitable exoplanets in galaxies far away.
Study reveals disparity between fibroblasts of different pancreatic diseases
Fibroblasts present in different pancreatic diseases are genetically distinct and their functions are 'programmed' by the unique environment of each disease, according to new research from the University of Liverpool (UK).
Coronaviruses do not readily induce cross-protective antibody responses
Patients infected with either severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or SARS-CoV-2 produce antibodies that bind to the other coronavirus, but the cross-reactive antibodies are not cross protective, at least in cell-culture experiments, researchers report May 17 in the journal Cell Reports.
Characteristics of adolescents, adults with e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury
Following an outbreak of electronic cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) linked to hospitalizations and deaths, this  study used data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to compare demographic and clinical characteristics, along with substance use behaviors, between adolescents and adults with EVALI.
Mars: Where mud flows like lava
An international research team including recreated martian conditions in a low-pressure chamber to observe the flow of mud.
Spending on primary care vs. other US health care expenditures
National health care survey data were used to assess the amount of money spent on primary care relative to other areas of health care spending in the US from 2002 to 2016.
Complement genes add to sex-based vulnerability in lupus and schizophrenia
Variants in a gene of the human immune system cause men and women to have different vulnerabilities to the autoimmune diseases lupus and Sjögren's syndrome, according to findings published in the journal Nature.
New LAT1 inhibitor can boost cancer treatment
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new and promising drug compound for the treatment of cancer that inhibits natural amino acids from entering cancer cells.
Genomic selection in dairy cows creates opportunities not possible with traditional selection
The 2019 ADSA Annual Meeting featured the Joint ADSA/Interbull Breeding and Genetics Symposia titled ''Ten Years of Genomic Selection'' and ''Data Pipelines for Implementation of Genomic Evaluation of Novel Traits.'' Because of genomic selection's importance to dairy science, the Journal of Dairy Science invited the speakers to submit articles and share information from these symposia with a wider audience.
Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection.
High hopes for new-age rubber
Imagine a self-repairing rubber, or super-adhesive made entirely from waste materials.
The neglected heating sector
Heating accounts for over 50 per cent of final energy consumption.
Liver cancer: Awareness of hepatitis D must be raised
Scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) have studied the most serious consequence of chronic hepatitis: hepatocellular carcinoma.
Enzymes edit SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the body, perhaps fueling the virus' evolution
Two human deaminase enzymes edit the RNA of the SARS-CoV-2 virus when it enters a patient's body, with implications for the evolution of the virus and the spread of the infection, according to a new study.
SWOG researchers go digital at ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program
Researchers from SWOG, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, will make 31 presentations as part of the ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program, the online annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which runs May 29-31.
Scientists identify promising immunotherapy combination for pediatric brain cancer
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have discovered that combining immunotherapy with a drug called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) eradicated a deadly type of pediatric brain tumor in mice.
Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Good news for menopausal women taking hop supplements: Tests show no drug interactions
Hop-based dietary supplements that many women use to ease the night sweats and hot flashes commonly reported during menopause aren't likely to cause drug interactions.
Study: How to identify patients most at risk from COVID-19 through nanotechnology
What if doctors could not only diagnose a COVID-19 infection but identify which patients are at the greatest risk of death before any major complications arise?
NASA finds a disorganized tropical storm Arthur near North Carolina coast
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite and radar imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Arthur remains poorly organized.
FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region.
Light drives injection
By coupling a bacterial injection system with a light-controlled molecular switch, scientists are able to inject proteins into eukaryontic cells
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish.
During pandemic stage of emerging pathogen, climate has modest impact compared to population suscept
In influencing the trajectory of the pandemic stage of an emerging pathogen, a population's susceptibility to a novel disease is more influential than climate factors like humidity.
Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body.
Efficient, 'green' quantum-dot solar cells exploit defects
Novel quantum dot solar cells developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory match the efficiency of existing quantum-dot based devices, but without lead or other toxic elements that most solar cells of this type rely on.
How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression
Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.
A new epigenetic editing tool is developed to activate silenced genes
The research project is based on the CRISPR genetic editing technique and uses a plant protein to control gene expression in in-vitro cells.
Arts-based method to detect school bullying
Co-authors Daria Hanolainen and Elena Semenova created and tested an experimental method of graphical vignettes - a set of incomplete comic strips which kids are asked to complete using their own creative vision.
Antibody neutralizes SARS and COVID-19 coronaviruses
An antibody first identified in a blood sample from a patient who recovered from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 inhibits related coronaviruses, including the one that causes COVID-19.
Atrial fibrillation among overweight people is not due to fat
In a recently published study, researchers from Aarhus University document that the risk of atrial fibrillation is not linked to the amount of body fat, but instead to large muscle mass, or more precisely, a high fat-free weight
COVID-19: UW study reports 'staggering' death rate in US among those infected who show symptoms
New study finds the national rate of death among people infected with the novel coronavirus -- SARS-CoV-2 -- that causes COVID-19 and who show symptoms is 1.3%, the study found.
Smoking increases SARS-CoV-2 receptors in the lung
New research from CSHL scientists suggests that cigarette smoke spurs the lungs to make more ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), the protein that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 grabs and uses to enter human cells.
Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology.
New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world.
Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay.
How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016.
Identification of a determining factor in luminal cancer cells
Researchers at IRB Barcelona discover a new mechanism in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.
Global study confirms influential theory behind loss aversion
A new global study offers a powerful confirmation of one of the most influential frameworks in all of behavioral sciences and behavioral economics: prospect theory, which when introduced in 1979 led to a sea change in understanding the irrational and paradoxical ways individuals make decisions and interpret risk.
New study shows how our surveillance system is triggered inside tissues
A new study led by Marc Veldhoen, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular and published this week in the prestigious Nature Immunology, shows that the local availability of specific molecules is crucial to generate these tissue resident surveillance cells.
Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school.
Mystery of lava-like flows on Mars solved by scientists
The mystery of some lava-like flows on Mars has been solved by scientists who say they are caused not by lava but by mud.
Astronomers confirm existence of two giant newborn planets in PDS 70 system
New direct images captured with W. M. Keck Observatory's upgraded adaptive optics system lead to the first independent confirmation of two protoplanets orbiting the star PDS 70.
Latest 'Youth COVID-19' study shows young people worried for their future
Latest 'Youth Covid-19' study shows young people worried for their future prospects in the 'new normal'.
Egregious emissions
Call them 'super polluters' -- the handful of industrial facilities that emit unusually high levels of toxic chemical pollution year after year.
From digital to optical
Scientists have demonstrated how to create, using a femtosecond laser, an all-optical switch based on a metal-organic framework which can be synthesized in vitro and is usually used in chemistry for gas absorption.
Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers -- which are typically expensive to make -- could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers.
A scalable method of diagnosing HVAC sensor faults in smart buildings
Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are the biggest consumers of energy in a building.
Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six-month period.
NASA finds heavy water vapor concentration rings eye of Cyclone Amphan
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean on May 18, it gathered water vapor data that showed the intensity of powerful Tropical Cyclone Amphan.
Pregnant and lactating women with COVID-19: Scant clinical research
Pregnant and breastfeeding women have been excluded from clinical trials of drugs to treat COVID-19, and as result, there is no safety data to inform clinical decisions.
The malaria parasite P. vivax can remain in the spleen upon expression of certain proteins
The malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax can adhere to human spleen cells through the expression of so-called variant proteins.
Scientists use pressure to make liquid magnetism breakthrough
Scientists have forced a solid magnetic metal into a spin liquid state, which may lead to insights into superconductivity and quantum computing.
The Lancet Psychiatry: Study finds few immediate mental health effects of COVID-19, but longer-term impact must be considered
Most people admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 should recover without experiencing mental illness if infection with SARS-CoV-2 follows a similar course to the coronavirus epidemics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012, according to the first systematic review and meta-analysis looking at the psychiatric consequences of coronavirus infections in over 3,550 patients hospitalised with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.
Technological changes and new low-carbon lifestyles, key to mitigating climate change
In order to mitigate climate change impacts and achieve a more sustainable society, it is necessary to transform the current energy system based on fossil fuels into a model based on renewable energies, and to change society's lifestyles, accepting less mobility, low-carbon diets and smaller-sized dwellings.
COVID-19: Lessons to learn about the first 4.0 pandemic
Although the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak was officially presented suddenly in the popular market of exotic and wild animals in Wuhan in December 2019, phylogenetic studies state that coronavirus was already present in latency phase since October in this city in the province of Hubei.
A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall, has been found by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden.
Releasing molecular 'brake' kick-starts immune cell function
The immune system's ability to marshal specialized cells to fight off infection relies in part on tiny molecules called microRNAs, which act as a release for the 'brakes' that keep cells dormant until needed, according to a new study published in the journal Cell Reports.
The brain's facial recognition area doesn't differentiate outgroup members
A quirk in how the brain processes faces makes it harder to tell members of a racial outgroup apart, according to new research published in eNeuro.
'Tantalizing' clues about why a mysterious material switches from conductor to insulator
Tantalum disulfide is a mysterious material. According to textbook theory, it should be a conducting metal, but in the real world it acts like an insulator.
Clinical trial shows ability of stem cell-based topical solution to regrow hair
The results of a clinical trial released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine demonstrate how a topical solution made up of stem cells leads to the regrowth of hair for people with a common type of baldness.
Highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion in graphene heterostructures
KAIST physicists described a route to design the energy-efficient generation, manipulation and detection of spin currents using nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials.
NYU and IBM research takes electrons for a spin in moving toward more efficient, higher density data
Researchers at New York University and IBM Research have demonstrated a new mechanism involving electron motion in magnetic materials that points to new ways to potentially enhance data storage.
Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Rice engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today.
New model gives wineries better data from existing tests
WSU scientists present a new model that allows winemakers to get measurements in their wine that previously required difficult, tedious, or expensive testing.
Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally.
CUNY SPH weekly COVID-19 survey update week 10
In the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey, New Yorkers gave convincing evidence that the city is not yet testing enough people and set high expectations for the safety measures they feel are necessary for them to return to work outside their homes.
Most parents concerned about privacy, body image impact of tweens using health apps
Most parents say they have concerns about how health apps may impact children ages 8-12, according to the C.S.
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems.
Comparison of early postoperative pain after first vs second total knee arthroplasty
Comparing the postoperative period following the first and second TKA, there were no significant differences in Wong-Baker FACES pain assessment score (WBS) 24, 48, and 72 hrs postoperatively.
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol.
Accurate mapping of human travel patterns with global smartphone data
Understanding people's short- and long-distance travel patterns can inform economic development, urban planning, and responses to natural disasters, wars and conflicts, disease outbreaks like the COVID-19 pandemic, and more.
HHU physicists: No evidence of an influence of dark matter on the force between nuclei
Although most of the universe is made up of dark matter, very little is known about it.

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