Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 19, 2020
Six-month follow-up appropriate for BI-RADS 3 findings on mammography
Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up surveillance imaging at six months due to the small but not insignificant risk that the lesions are malignant, according to a new study.

Animal study shows human brain cells repair damage in multiple sclerosis
A new study shows that when specific human brain cells are transplanted into animal models of multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, the cells repair damage and restore function.

A new electrostatic descriptor -- The orbital electrostatic energy
The widely applied descriptors for ion-π interactions are the quadrupole moment, electrostatic potential and the polarizability of the π systems.

SUTD scientists led development of novel acoustofluidic technology that isolates submicron particles
SUTD researchers and their collaborators developed a novel nanoacoustic trapping device that manipulates particles within submicron ranges by applying a structured elastic layer at the interface between a microfluidic channel and a travelling surface acoustic wave (SAW).

What if we could design powerful drugs without unwanted side effects?
The paper describes how to minimize or eliminate side effects in drugs that target G protein-coupled receptors.

X-ray experiments zero in on COVID-19 antibodies
An antibody derived from a SARS survivor in 2003 appears to effectively neutralize the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, opening the door for speedy development of a targeted treatment.

How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind

Research shows that the combined production of fish and vegetables can be profitable
When it comes to future food production, the combined farming of fish and vegetables through aquaponics is currently a hotly debated topic.

Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body.

Cooperation can be contagious particularly when people see the benefit for others
Seeing someone do something good for someone else motivates witnesses to perform their own helpful acts, an insight that could help drive cooperative behavior in communities navigating through the health crisis.

Nationwide survey about the corona pandemic
Majority feels strained, trusts health measures and favors a wealth tax on the rich.

Image analysis technique provides better understanding of heart cell defects
Many patients with heart disease face limited treatment options. Fortunately, stem cell biology has enabled researchers to produce large numbers of cardiomyocytes, which may be used in drug screens and cell-based therapies.

Personalised ovarian cancer risk prediction reduces worries
Offering personalized ovarian cancer risk prediction to women shows that 98 per cent of participants felt less worried after finding out their ovarian cancer risk status, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.

NASA examines tropical storm Arthur's rainfall as it transitions
When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean, it captured rainfall data on Tropical Storm Arthur as the storm was transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.

Navigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), has released a special issue providing clinicians and researchers an up-to-date resource on the risk factors, natural history, diagnosis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Six feet not far enough to stop virus transmission in light winds
Airborne transmission of viruses, like the virus causing COVID-19, is not well understood, but a good baseline for study is a deeper understanding of how particles travel through the air when people cough.

Keep away from water: Skoltech scientists show a promising solid electrolyte is 'hydrophobic'
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues have shown that LATP, a solid electrolytes considered for use in next-generation energy storage, is highly sensitive to water, which has direct implications for potential battery performance and lifetime.

A spreadable interlayer could make solid state batteries more stable
Solid state batteries are of great interest to the electric vehicle industry.

Is your job killing you? Stress, lack of autonomy, ability can lead to depression, death
A new study from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands.

Discovery of a new biomarker for Alzheimer's sisease (AD)
KBRI research team led by Dr. Jae-Yeol Joo publishes new findings in IJMS.

How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
Most insects alter their own development or physiology to overcome adverse conditions, such as harsh winters.

VR and AR devices at 1/100 the cost and 1/10,000 the thickness in the works
Professor Junsuk Rho of the departments of mechanical engineering and chemical engineering and doctoral student in mechanical engineering Gwanho Yoon at POSTECH with the research team at Korea University have jointly developed moldable nanomaterials and a printing technology using metamaterials, allowing the commercialization of inexpensive and thin VR and AR devices.

New study confirms important clues to fight ovarian cancer
A new study comparing cancerous tissue with normal fallopian tube samples advances important insights about the rogue cellular machinery that drives a majority of ovarian cancers.

Antibiotic exposure in infants associated with higher risks of childhood obesity
Very young children exposed to antibiotics at an early age (from birth to 12 months) are associated with higher risks of childhood obesity and increased adiposity in early to mid-childhood.

COVID-19 puts brakes on global emissions
Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel sources reached a maximum daily decline of 17 per cent in April as a result of drastic decline in energy demand that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Subcellular chatter regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active.

Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world
Iowa State's Jigang Wang continues to explore using light waves to accelerate supercurrents to access the unique and potentially useful properties of the quantum world.

Women in criminal justice system less likely to receive treatment for opioid use
Pregnant women involved in the criminal justice system are disproportionately not receiving medications for opioid use disorder, as compared to their peers, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in PLOS Medicine.

Algorithmic autos
Connected and automated vehicles use technology such as sensors, cameras and advanced control algorithms to adjust their operation to changing conditions with little or no input from drivers.

Galactic cosmic rays now available for study on Earth, thanks to NASA
To better understand and mitigate the health risks faced by astronauts from exposure to space radiation, we ideally need to be able to test the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) here on Earth under laboratory conditions.

Hunting for the next generation of conservation stewards
Wildlife ecology students become the professionals responsible for managing the biodiversity of natural systems for species conservation.

Radio: The medium that is best dealing with the COVID-19 crisis
During lockdown, the Media Psychology Lab, directed by Emma Rodero, a lecturer with the UPF Department of Communication, has conducted a study on the listening habits, consumption, credibility and psychological impact of the radio in the COVID-19 crisis.

MIT engineers propose a safer method for sharing ventilators
Researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new way to share ventilators between patients, which they believe could be used as a last resort to treat Covid-19 patients in acute respiratory distress.

New analytic tool designed to help guide precision oncology discovery and treatments
How can researchers and oncologists glean meaningful information from mounds of data to help guide cancer research and patient care?

How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The 'PaNDiv' experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands.

4D electric circuit network with topology
Researchers from China and Germany have proposed a design scheme to implement a four-dimensional topological insulating state in circuit network, which provides a convenient physical platform for studying high-dimensional states.

SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests are useful for population-level assessments
In this Focus, Juliet Bryant and colleagues highlight the potential power of population-level serological, or antibody, testing to provide snapshots of infection history and immunity in populations as the COVID-19 pandemic progresses

An open-access tool to accelerate drug discovery
The Chemical Checker provides processed, harmonized and ready-to-use bioactivity information on more than 1M small molecules.

New rare disease with own facial features, cardiac defects and developmental delay
An international multicentre study describes a rare disease characterized by a series of recognizable facial features, cardiac defects and intellectual disability, which they propose to name as TRAF7 syndrome -according to the name of the gen that causes this pathology.

School segregation by wealth creating unequal learning outcomes in the Global South
Millions of the world's poorest children are leaving school without mastering even basic levels of reading or maths because of an overlooked pattern of widespread, wealth-based inequalities in their countries' education systems, new research suggests.

New biomarker could flag tumors that are sensitive to common diabetes drug
A newly identified biomarker could help scientists pinpoint which cancers are vulnerable to treatment with biguanides, a common class of medications used to control blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes.

Novel tool developed to diagnose and monitor autoimmune disorders
Russian researchers have developed a novel method for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune disorders.

Computer model can process disparate sources of clinical data to predict brain age
Scientists have trained a computer to analyse different types of brain scan and predict the age of the human brain, according to a new study in the open-access journal eLife.

Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
Biologists how different oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of California and the Baja California Peninsula influenced formation of new species of sharks and rays.

Modified clinical trial protocol created in response to urgency of COVID-19 pandemic
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society describes a nimble, pragmatic and rigorous multicenter clinical trial design to meet urgent community needs in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Three-dimensional chessboards
Scientists at Osaka University develop a liquid-phase method for 3D-printing nanocellulose fibers aligned in multiple directions.

Construction of hollow nanoreactors for enhanced photo-oxidations
It is desirable to design hollow structures with multi-scale functions and precise spatial location of active sites for the construction of micro/nanoreactors.

Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
University of Tsukuba researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months.

Rolling 50/30 day cycle of lockdown and relaxation could help manage COVID-19
An alternating cycle of 50 days of strict lockdown followed by 30 days of easing could be an effective strategy for reducing the number of COVID-19-related deaths and admissions to intensive care units, say an international team of researchers.

Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

Self-isolating? Get fit faster with multi-ghost racing
Eager to ramp up your fitness while stuck at home?

New artificial intelligence model to bridge biology and chemistry
Generative biology meets generative chemistry: bidirectional conditional autoencoder to generate novel molecular structures for the desired transcriptional response.

Hierarchical self-assembly of atomically precise nanoclusters
The supramolecular chemistry of nanoclusters is a flourishing area of nano-research; however, the controllable assembly of cluster nano-building blocks in different arrays remains challenging.

Artificial pieces of brain use light to communicate with real neurons
Researchers at The University of Tokyo, University of Bordeaux and at Ikerbasque have created a way for artificial neuronal networks to communicate with biological neuronal networks.

Additional genetic cause for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease discovered
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in Europe and the United States.

Molecule-plasmon coupling strength tunes surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectral lineshapes
Molecular vibration-plasmon interactions lead to not only the enhancement of molecular spectral intensity but also the distortion of spectral Lorentzian lineshapes into asymmetric Fano-type or more complicated lineshapes in the surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectra; this effect hampers the correct readout of vibrational frequencies and intensities for an accurate interpretation of the measured spectra and quantitative analysis.

Nature unveiling herself before science
21st century societal challenges such as demographic developments and an ageing population demand for new functional materials, such as for bone prostheses.

Landmark recommendations on development of artificial intelligence and the future of global health
A landmark review of the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of global health published in The Lancet calls on the global health community to establish guidelines for development and deployment of new technologies and to develop a human-centered research agenda to facilitate equitable and ethical use of AI.

Molybdenum telluride nanosheets enable selective electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide
Selective electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from oxygen reduction reaction in acids is highly desirable but challenging.

Emerging viral diseases causing serious issues in west Africa
In a new study, researchers from the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus call attention to the emergence of mosquito-borne viral outbreaks in West Africa, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses.

The Lancet: First prospective study of critically ill COVID-19 patients from New York City sheds light on how virus affects adult patients in USA
A detailed report from 257 COVID-19 patients admitted to two hospitals in New York City, USA from 2 March to 1 April 2020, and followed for at least 28 days, is published today in The Lancet, offering a snapshot of how the virus affects adults requiring hospital care.

Protein shapes matter in Alzheimer's research
Even a small change may cause long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity.

Cervical precancer identified by fluorescence, in a step toward bedside detection
Researchers developed a method using fluorescence to detect precancerous metabolic and physical changes in individual epithelial cells lining the cervix, and can visualize those changes at different depths of the epithelial tissue near the surface.

Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else.

Study suggests aggressive carbon taxation could help US meet targets in Paris agreement
A new study looked at US tax policy as it relates to carbon dioxide (CO2), from 2015 through 2030.

MUSC researchers link gene mutation to autism behaviors
A collaboration between scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina and clinicians at the Greenwood Genetic Center has yielded new findings about how a particular gene might regulate brain development.

Scientists find a high hydrofluorocarbon emissions intensity in the Yangtze River Delta region
A new study estimates the emissions of HFCs in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region by a tracer ratio method for the period 2012-2016 and finds the emissions intensity of HFCs in this area is higher than both national and global levels, in terms of per capita, per unit area, or per unit GDP.

Immunotherapy, steroids had positive outcomes in children with COVID-related multi-system inflammatory syndrome
Treatment with antibodies purified from donated blood -- immune globulin therapy -- and steroids restored heart function in the majority of children with COVID-related multi-system inflammatory syndrome, according to new research published yesterday in Circulation, the flagship journal of the American Heart Association.

Continuously tracking fear response could improve mental health treatment
If continuously monitored, fear can be used as a tool to improve mental health treatment, reports University of Houston researcher Rose Faghih, who has created a new algorithm for continuously monitoring the fear response using stress sweat and heart rate.

Migratory secrets of recovering whale species
Scientists have discovered where a whale species that feeds around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia breeds during the winter months.

COVID-19 antibody testing needn't be perfect to guide public health and policy decisions
While it's too soon to use COVID-19 antibody testing to issue 'immunity passports', antibody tests that are available today are good enough to inform decisions about public health and relaxing social distancing interventions, says an international group of infectious disease and public health experts in Science Immunology today.

Women told more white lies in evaluations than men: Study
Women are more likely to be given inaccurate performance feedback, according to new research by Lily Jampol, Ph.D.

Modeling COVID-19 data must be done with extreme care
As the virus causing COVID-19 began its devastating spread, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries' epidemiologists.

Retrofitting of VW Diesel engines was successful
Using exhaust gas measurements taken from the roadside, a team from the University of York and Empa was able to prove the ''Dieselgate'' scandal has led to positive results.

Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife.

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Amphan's eye obscured
Early on May 18, 2020, Tropical Cyclone Amphan was a Category 5 storm in the Northern Indian Ocean.

Partial measures compromise effectiveness of efforts to combat COVID-19
A study at the Faculty of Business Sciences, University of Tsukuba shows that comprehensive implementation of COVID-19 infection prevention measures boosts their effectiveness, while partial implementation compromises it.

Large shift of the Pacific Walker Circulation across the Cenozoic
Yan and colleagues presented a modeled scenario for the Cenozoic evolution of the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC; ~65 Ma to present).

African-American and white women share genes that increase breast cancer risk
The same genes that greatly increase the risk of breast cancer in US white women, including women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, also greatly increase breast cancer risk among African-American women.

But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation.

NASA's Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks
By studying the chemical elements on Mars today -- including carbon and oxygen -- scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.

Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with typical development show similar proactive cognitive control.

Determining the quantity and location of lipids in the brain
The Sweedler Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a new technique to measure the amount and distribution of lipids in rat brain samples.

RNA molecules in maternal blood may predict pregnancies at risk for preeclampsia
UC San Diego researchers have identified small molecules in the blood of asymptomatic pregnant women that may predict risk for preeclampsia, responsible for a significant proportion of maternal and neonatal deaths, low birth weight and is a primary cause of premature birth.

Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors.

Children not immune to coronavirus; new study from pandemic epicenter describes severe COVID-19 response in children
- While most children infected with the novel coronavirus have mild symptoms, a subset requires hospitalization and a small number require intensive care.

COVID-19 tests compared
In an important, comprehensive, and timely review, an expert team from the University of California Berkeley details the methodologies used in nucleic acid-based tests for detecting the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Food system innovation -- and how to get there
Food production has always shaped the lives of humans and the surface of the Earth.

Field courses boost student success, support STEM diversity efforts, study reveals
The challenge of diversifying STEM fields may get a boost from the results of a new study that show field courses help build self-confidence among students -- especially those from underrepresented groups.

New technique separates industrial noise from natural seismic signals
For the first time, seismologists can characterize signals as a result of some industrial human activity on a continent-wide scale using cloud computing.

2D molecular crystals modulating electronic properties of organic semiconductors
Recently, researchers report a controllable surface doping strategy utilizing 2D molecular crystals (2DMCs) as dopants to boost the mobility and to modulate the threshold voltage of OFETs.

Stanford researcher envisions energy and environment landscape after COVID-19
Global carbon dioxide emissions are down dramatically in the wake of COVID-19.

Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a fast growing and invasive cancer, and now scientists understand the molecular dance that makes it so deadly.

UMD researchers tap CRISPR technology to connect biology, electronics
In an effort to create first-of-kind microelectronic devices that connect with biological systems, University of Maryland (UMD) researchers are utilizing CRISPR technology in a novel way to electronically turn 'on' and 'off' several genes simultaneously.

Observing the freely behaving brain in action
Scientists have developed a head-mounted miniature microscope, the so-called fiberscope, that is capable of imaging all cortical layers of a freely moving rat

Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor
This odd behavior may promote the material's ability upon cooling to perfectly conduct electricity in a way unexplained by standard theories.

Thousands of lives could be lost to delays in cancer surgery during COVID-19 pandemic
Delays to cancer surgery and other treatment caused by the COVID-19 crisis could result in thousands of additional deaths linked to the pandemic in England, a major new study reports.

Seven at one pulse
Higher frequencies mean faster data transfer and more powerful processors.

Rapid screening method targets fatty acids in yeast; Key to sustainable bioproducts
Scientists engineering valuable microbes for renewable fuels and bioproducts have developed an efficient way to identify the most promising varieties.

HKBU scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.

Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing
A major transformation in vertebrate evolution took place when breathing shifted from being driven by head and throat muscles -- like in fish and frogs -- to the torso -- like in reptiles and mammals.

Chemicals often found in consumer products could lead to obesity and fatty liver diseases
Chemical compounds found in many consumer products could be major contributors to the onset of lipid-related diseases, such as obesity, in humans, according to a Baylor University study.

Researchers go cuckoo: Antarctic penguins release an extreme amount of laughing gas
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces.

Study reveals mental health of medical personnel working with COVID-19 patients
Medical personnel treating coronavirus cases in China have higher rates of anxiety and other mental health symptoms than the general population, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ning Sun of Ningbo College of Health Science in Ningbo China, and colleagues.

People with atrial fibrillation live longer with exercise
More than 100,000 Norwegians have atrial fibrillation. They should be actively exercising for their health.

COVID-19 crisis causes 17% drop in global carbon emissions
The COVID-19 global lockdown has had an 'extreme' effect on daily carbon emissions, but it is unlikely to last -- according to a new analysis by an international team of scientists.

Uncovering Alzheimer's disease
Characterized by a buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, Alzheimer's is an irreversible disease that leads to memory loss and a decrease in cognitive function.

Game-changing technologies can transform our food systems
In the next three decades we will need a 30-70% increase in food availability to meet the demand from an increasing population.

Fishing rod 'selfie stick' and scientific sleuthing turn up clues to extinct sea reptile
A Russian paleontologist visiting the Natural History Museum in London desperately wanted a good look at the skeleton of an extinct aquatic reptile, but its glass case was too far up the wall.

Researchers find potential drug treatment targets for alcohol-related liver disease
A team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital has uncovered key molecular step stones in ALD that may provide targets for drug therapy development.

Study finds some reductions in community antibiotic resistant infections and dispensing
A study by academics at the University of Bristol has found reductions in overall and individual antibiotic dispensing between 2013 and 2016 after evaluating, for the first time, national primary care prescribing policy on community antibiotic resistant infection.

Walking or cycling to work associated with reduced risk of early death and illness
People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car.

Exposure to ultrafine aerosol particles in homes depends primarily on people themselves
Residents have it above all in their own hands how high the concentrations of ultrafine dust are in their homes.

Researchers urge clinical trial of blood pressure drug to prevent complication of Covid-19
Researchers in the Ludwig Center at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have identified a drug treatment that could--if given early enough--potentially reduce the risk of death from the most serious complication of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), also known as SARS-CoV-2 infection.

How the mouse conquered the house
A study, published in Scientific Reports on May 19, 2020, reconstructs the history of the biological invasion of the house mouse and reveals that the diffusion dates into Europe coincide with the first appearance of domestic cats on the continent.

Mount Sinai first in US using artificial intelligence to analyze COVID-19 patients
Technology may lead to rapid diagnosis based on CT scans and patient data.

Found: Brain structure that controls our behavior
Solving problems, planning one's own actions, controlling emotions -- these executive functions are fundamental processes for controlling our behavior.

High rate of blood clots in COVID-19
COVID-19 is associated with a high incidence of venous thromboembolism, blood clots in the venous circulation, according to a study conducted by researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), UK.

Exposure to TV alcohol ads linked to drinking behavior
New research from Cornell University shows the more alcohol ads someone was exposed to, the more likely they were to report consuming at least one alcoholic drink in the previous month.

Statistical approach to COVID-19 clinical trials aims to accelerate drug approval process
MIT researchers develop analytics focused on accelerating COVID-19 therapeutics clinical trials and attracting more funding for vaccines and anti-infectives.

Madagascar copal: New dating for an Antropocene ancient resin
The known Madagascar copal is a more recent resin from what was thought -it has about a few hundred years- and trapped pieces in this material are not as palaeontological important as thought traditionally.

COVID-19 crisis triage -- Optimizing health outcomes and disability rights
New England Journal of Medicine article offers policy recommendations for triage protocols that save the most lives and protect core values, such as the equal moral worth of all people.

Intent defined optical network for intelligent operation and maintenance
Traditionally, the operation and maintenance of optical networks rely on the experience of engineers to configure network parameters, involving command-line interface, middle-ware scripting, and troubleshooting.

Parent-led discussion about mutual strengths benefits parent-teen communication
A primary care-based intervention to promote parent-teen communication led to less distress and increased positive emotions among adolescents, as well as improved communication for many teens, according to a new study by researchers at the Center for Parent and Teen Communication at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization.

Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues.

Less water could sustain more Californians if we make every drop count
California cities can no longer rely on their three traditional water-coping strategies: over-drafting groundwater, depleting streams and importing water from far away.
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