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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 26, 2020


Directed protein evolution with CRISPR-Cas9
New area of application for gene scissors: Optimized proteins for biomedical research.
Chromosomal speciation in wild house mice
A new look into the genomes of natural populations of the common house mice by a team of researchers from the University of Konstanz, Harvard University and La Sapienza University of Rome suggests that large-scale chromosomal rearrangements play an important role in speciation.
High-resolution 3D view inside tumors
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. But individual tumors can vary significantly, presenting different spatial patterns within their mass.
The first 3D map of the heart's neurons
An interdisciplinary research team establishes a new technological pipeline to build a 3D map of the neurons in the heart, revealing foundational insight into their role in heart attacks and other cardiac conditions.
Warming climate is changing where birds breed
Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing.
Cichlid fish loves exaggerated shells
Scientists dissect the complex choices of animals.
Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered
New research is shedding light on the biological architecture that lets us hear -- and on a genetic disorder that causes both deafness and blindness.
Flow-through electrodes make hydrogen 50 times faster
Duke chemists tested three new materials as a porous, flow-through electrode to make hydrogen from electrolysis.
New testing system predicts septic shock outcomes
PME professor Savas Tay and his collaborators have developed a new, extremely sensitive method that can quantify bacteria, an antibiotic resistant gene, and immune molecule levels within sepsis patients, far more rapidly than current protocols.
Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space
As inevitable fellow travellers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments.
Urge to merge: Understanding how cells fuse
New research from UT Southwestern may help those with rare muscle diseases.
Circadian oscillation of a cyanobacterium doesn't need all three Kai proteins to keep going
Despite conventional understanding that three Kai proteins are required for the circadian oscillation of cyanobacteria, scientists discovered that even when one of them is destroyed, the oscillation is not completely abolished but instead damped.
Return of the Blob: Surprise link found to edge turbulence in fusion plasma
Correlation discovered between magnetic turbulence in fusion plasmas and troublesome blobs at the plasma edge.
Ocean virus hijacks carbon-storing bacteria
Rice University scientists are analyzing the role of ferredoxin proteins produced when viral phages alter electron transfer in ocean-dwelling, photosynthetic bacteria that produce oxygen and store carbon.
Designing technologies that interpret your mood from your skin
An international team of researchers from Sweden and the UK have developed an innovative way of interpreting biological signals produced by the conductance of our skin.
More effective human antibodies possible with chicken cells
Antibodies for potential use as medicines can be made rapidly in chicken cells grown in laboratories.
NASA catches the extra-tropical ending of Mangga
By Sunday, May 24, 2020, Tropical Cyclone Mangga had already transitioned to an extra-tropical storm and was affecting the southwestern coast of Australia.
Modern problems, primitive solutions: A glimpse into archaic protein synthesis systems
The interaction between 'transfer RNAs' and the enzymes that help them in protein synthesis has always been the key area of interest for understanding the evolution of the genetic code.
Bullying among LGBTQ youth who died by suicide
Postmortem records from the National Violent Death Reporting System were used to determine how common being bullied was among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) youth ages 10 to 19 who died by suicide compared with non-LGBTQ young people who died by suicide.
Cold-adapted enzymes can transform at room temperature
Enzymes from cold-loving organisms that live at low temperatures, close to the freezing point of water, display highly distinctive properties.
Controlling artificial cilia with magnetic fields and light
Researchers have made artificial cilia, or hair-like structures, that can bend into new shapes in response to a magnetic field, then return to their original shape when exposed to the proper light source.
Kirigami/origami: Unfolding the new regime of advanced 3D micro-/nanofabrication with 'folding'
Emerging kirigami/origami techniques, neither subtractive nor additive, provide an automated fashion for 3D micro-/nanofabrication through folding, bending and twisting of 2D materials/structures.
Ultrafast optical response and ablation mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide
Most studies on the electron dynamics of molybdenum disulfide examined levels below the damage threshold.
Bricks made from plastic, organic waste
Revolutionary 'green' types of bricks and construction materials could be made from recycled PVC, waste plant fibres or sand with the help of a remarkable new kind of rubber polymer discovered by Australian scientists.
Study: Benefits of workplace wellness programs underwhelming
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studied the efficacy of workplace wellness programs and found only a modest impact on employee health, health beliefs and medical utilization.
Bullying is common factor in LGBTQ youth suicides, Yale study finds
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers.
The analysis of copper levels in blood facilitates diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
In biology it is well-known that every living organism is triggered by the hereditary material or DNA that encodes various protein molecules, which in turn perform all the necessary biological functions and it might seem that nothing else is needed to sustain the life of an organism.
Watching single protons moving at water-solid interfaces
Scientists at EPFL have been able to observe single protons moving at the interface between water and a solid surface.
Women almost twice as likely to choose primary care as men
Analysis of osteopathic medical school survey data reveals women are 1.75 times more likely to choose primary care than men, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.
Study investigates sexual activity in lockdown
New research indicates that only four in 10 UK adults have been sexually active during the COVID-19 lockdown - a finding that could have important physical and mental health implications.
Countering COVID-19 impacts on children from low-income households
The COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the social, educational and health care disparities already plaguing the nearly 40 million Americans the US Census Bureau estimates are living in poverty.
Nanodevices show how cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development.
Anti-malarial drug shows promise for brain cancer treatment
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of cancer in the brain that is typically fatal.
Eye injury sets immune cells on surveillance to protect the lens
The discovery further challenges the accepted scientific dogma that the lens is shut out from the immune protection.
Can e-learning help stem the threat of invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed?
E-learning could be a crucial tool in the biosecurity fight against invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed, Zebra Mussels and Signal Crayfish according to a new study published in the academic journal 'Biological Invasions'.
Honeybees: Pesticides disrupt nursing behavior and larval development
A newly developed video technique has allowed scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt at the Bee Research Institute of the Polytechnical Society to record the complete development of a honey bee in its hive.
Effect of reducing blood pressure medications on blood pressure control in older adults
Whether the amount of blood pressure medications taken by older adults could be reduced safely and without a significant change in short-term blood pressure control was the objective of this randomized clinical trial that included 534 adults 80 and older.
Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C.
Controlling angular dispersions in optical metasurfaces
The uncontrolled angular responses of metasurfaces have significantly hampered their practical applications.
Exposure to 'good bacteria' during pregnancy buffers risk of autism-like syndrome
Giving beneficial bacteria to stressed mothers during the equivalent of the third trimester of pregnancy prevents an autism-like disorder in their offspring, according to a new animal study.
Lymph node metastases form through a wider evolutionary bottleneck than distant metastases
A Mass General-led research team has shown that lymph node and distant metastases develop through different evolutionary mechanisms.
Scientists reveal new fundamental principles governing diving in animals
An international team of scientists has examined how metabolic constraints govern the diving performance of air-breathing aquatic species, all of which have evolved to maximise the amount of time they can spend underwater
Spirituality linked to higher quality of life for stroke survivors, caregivers
Higher spirituality was strongly linked to better quality of life for stroke survivors and their caregivers.
Study confirms effective, less toxic treatment option for adults with Burkitt lymphoma
In a new study, an alternative treatment regimen that is less toxic than standard dose-intensive chemotherapy was found to be highly effective for adults with Burkitt lymphoma across all age groups and independent of HIV status.
Produce-buying incentive program a win-win for Oregon consumers and farmers
A national program that offers financial incentives so that low-income consumers can purchase more fruits and vegetables has shown great success in Oregon, according to a recent Oregon State University study.
AI management can benefit the growing online workforce
USC research shows that gig workers and others in the new crowdwork economy need more autonomy and clear purpose in online tasks to perform at a high level -- advantages that AI assistance offers.
Sugar turns brown algae into good carbon stores
Brown algae are important players in the global carbon cycle by fixing large amounts of carbon dioxide and thus extracting this greenhouse gas from the atmosphere.
How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society.
Can interactive technology ease urban traffic jams?
Traffic congestion is a serious problem in the United States, but a new analysis shows that interactive technology -- ranging from 511 traffic information systems and roadside cameras to traffic apps like Waze and Google Maps -- is helping in cities that use it.
Astronomers create cloud atlas for hot, Jupiter-like exoplanets
As astronomers ramp up study of the atmospheres of hot, Jupiter-like planets around other stars, they encounter clouds that obscure study of atmospheric gases.
Effect of workplace wellness program on employee health, medical use
This randomized clinical trial evaluated the effect of a workplace wellness program that included health screenings, wellness activities and financial incentives on employee health, health beliefs and medical use after 12 and 24 months among 4,800 employees at a large US university.
Exchange of arms between chromosomes using molecular scissors
The CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors work like a fine surgical instrument and can be used to modify genetic information in plants.
Photoelectron Momentum Microscope for μm-material electronic structure visualization
The importance of characterizing electronic properties of μm- and nm-scale world cannot be overemphasized.
Study: Children may not always grow out of being picky eaters
By age four, children could be established picky eaters, a new study suggests.
Schizophrenia: When the thalamus misleads the ear
Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Synapsy National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) have succeeded in linking the onset of auditory hallucinations - one of the most common symptoms of schizophrenia - with the abnormal development of certain substructures of a region deep in the brain called the thalamus.
High rates of COVID-19 on American Indian reservations - water and language barriers affect risk
Early in the pandemic, American Indian Reservations have experienced a disproportionately high incidence of COVID-19 infections: four times higher than in the US population, reports a study in the July/August issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.
Fine-tuning treatment for triple-negative breast cancer
Researchers at the University of Queensland may have found a way to improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.
Airborne science discovers complex geomorphic controls on Bornean forests
Using tree chemistry maps created by ASU's Global Airborne Observatory, high-resolution topography data, and computer models, researchers at Stanford University and Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science uncovered new insights into the processes behind how life coevolved with our planet.
Novel electric impulses relieve the pain
Chronic pain can be reduced by stimulating the vagus nerve in the ear with electrodes.
Ear infections discovered in remains of humans living in levant 15,000 years ago
Researchers at Tel Aviv University have discovered evidence of ear infections in the skull remains of humans living in the Levant some 15,000 years ago.
Researchers call for new approach to some mental disorders
Depression, anxiety and PTSD might not be disorders at all, according to a recent paper by Washington State University biological anthropologists.
HKU ecologists and international team discover ongoing and future tropical diversity decline
How can patterns in the marine biodiversity of the past help us to understand how it may change in the future?
Astrophysicists capture new class of transient objects
After astronomers visually spotted a bright burst in a tiny galaxy 500 million lightyears away from Earth in 2016, a Northwestern University-led team has determined that the anomaly is the third fast blue optical transient (FBOT) ever captured in radio- and X-ray wavelengths.
Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
MIT researchers have discovered a phenomenon that could be harnessed to control the movement of tiny particles floating in suspension.
UToledo chemists identify toxic chemicals in fracking wastewater
The research scientists of the new Dr. Nina McClelland Laboratory for Water Chemistry and Environmental Analysis at UToledo created a new method that simultaneously identified 201 chemical compounds in fracking wastewater, called produced water.
Renewable energy advance
In order to identify materials that can improve storage technologies for fuel cells and batteries, you need to be able to visualize the actual three-dimensional structure of a particular material up close and in context.
Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme
In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics.
Evidence insufficient regarding interventions to prevent illicit drug use in children, teens and young adults
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation regarding primary care-based behavioral counseling interventions to prevent illicit drug use (including nonmedical use of prescription drugs) in children, adolescents and young adults.
A thin lensless camera free of noise
Scientists from Tsinghua University in China and MIT in the US report that applying a compressive sensing algorithm can significantly improve the quality of lensless imaging.
Novel insight reveals topological tangle in unexpected corner of the universe
In a recent theoretical study, scientists discovered the presence of the Hopfion topological structure in nano-sized particles of ferroelectrics -- materials with promising applications in microelectronics and information technology.
Astronomers discover new class of cosmic explosions
Analysis of two cosmic explosions indicates to astronomers that the pair, along with a puzzling blast from 2018, constitute a new type of event, with similarities to some supernovae and gamma-ray bursts, but also with significant differences.
Catch and release: collagen-mediated control of PEDF availability
Extracellular ligand PEDF holds cell fate in its hands, inducing cell death or promoting survival depending on which host cell receptor it binds to.
Chimpanzees help trace the evolution of human speech back to ancient ancestors
One of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech has finally received support from chimpanzee communication, in a study conducted by a group of researchers led by the University of Warwick.
Dementia gene raises risk of severe COVID-19
Having a faulty gene linked to dementia doubles the risk of developing severe COVID-19, according to a large-scale study.
Defects in developing frog brain can be prevented or repaired with bioelectric drugs
Researchers discovered that the brains of developing frog embryos damaged by nicotine exposure can be repaired by treatment with certain drugs -- ionoceuticals -- that drive the recovery of bioelectric patterns in the embryo, followed by repair of normal anatomy, gene expression and brain function in the growing tadpole.
New method reveals where DNA is at risk in the cell
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new sequencing method that makes it possible to map how DNA is spatially organised in the cell nucleus -- revealing which genomic regions are at higher risk of mutation and DNA damage.
New method for capturing carbon via root exudates in wild forest
The fine root systems of four coniferous trees were measured for carbon exudates in the natural environment.
Can copying your friends help you achieve your goals?
Consumers often struggle to achieve self-set life improvement goals, but what if deliberately emulating the successful strategies used by their friends could help them?
Female Gulf War combat veterans have persistent symptoms more than 25 years later
More than a quarter century after the Gulf War, female veterans who saw combat have nearly a twofold risk of reporting more than 20 total medical symptoms, like cognition and respiratory troubles, than their fellow female veterans who were not deployed, investigators report.
Controlling superconductors with light
IBS scientists has reported a conceptually new method to study the properties of superconductors using optical tools.
A clinical decision system to predict trauma patient outcome
Chinese researchers from Trauma Center, Peking University People's Hospital and National Institute of Health Data Science of Peking University are using big data to help identify trauma patients who could experience potential adverse health events in the emergency department through the aid of a clinical decision support system.
Fit test, filtration efficiency of disposable N95 masks after irradiation
The fit and filtration efficiency of disposable N95 masks after sterilization by cobalt-60 gamma irradiation are examined in this quality improvement study.
NIST formula may help 5G wireless networks efficiently share communications frequencies
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a mathematical formula that, computer simulations suggest, could help 5G and other wireless networks select and share communications frequencies about 5,000 times more efficiently than trial-and-error methods.
Peer-reviewed data shows remdesivir for COVID-19 improves time to recovery
The investigational antiviral remdesivir is superior to the standard of care for the treatment of COVID-19, according to a report in NEJM.
Long hospital stays, high rates of ICU admission for US COVID-19 patients
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the U.S. are enduring longer hospital stays and facing higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission than patients in China, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and Kaiser Permanente.
Privacy flaws in security and doorbell cameras discovered by Florida Tech Student
Ring, Nest, SimpliSafe and eight other manufacturers of internet-connected doorbell and security cameras have been alerted to ''systemic design flaws'' discovered by Florida Tech computer science student Blake Janes that allow a shared account that appears to have been removed to actually remain in place with continued access to the video feed.
Researchers discover key player in hepatitis A virus infection
University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers designed experiments using gene-editing tools to discover how molecules called gangliosides serve as de facto gatekeepers to allow the virus entry into liver cells and trigger disease.
Up to 60% of students in some schools vaped in past month
Vaping is most heavily concentrated in US schools with a higher proportion of white students, schools in the South and West, and schools where more students smoke cigarettes, a new University of Michigan study shows.
Researchers discover how protein can inhibit cancer development in mice
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered how the protein PP2A can inhibit tumour growth in mice.
Scientists find optimal age of stem cells
Biophysicists from MIPT and Vladimirsky Moscow Regional Clinical Research Institute have determined the optimal age of reprogrammed stem cells suitable for restoring heart tissue.
Study reveals substantial quantities of tyre particles contaminating rivers and ocean
Research led by the University of Plymouth reveals vital new information that will improve our scientific understanding of how tiny particles from tyres, synthetic fibres from clothing and maritime gear enter the ocean
Warwick scientists discover how cells respond to fasting
As modern life-styles and high calorie diets drive the UK's obesity levels up, researchers from the University of Warwick have found how cells respond to fasting and activate the process called autophagy, which means a healthier lifestyle can be promoted to help people maintain a healthy body weight.
Women with Neandertal gene give birth to more children
One in three women in Europe inherited the receptor for progesterone from Neandertals -- a gene variant associated with increased fertility, fewer bleedings during early pregnancy and fewer miscarriages.
High-strain exercise linked to very early pregnancy loss
In women with a history of miscarriage, higher levels of physical activity were associated with a greater risk of subclinical, or very early, pregnancy loss, according to new research at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
Scientists synthesize anti-inflammatory tick spit protein for first time
In a world first, scientists at the University of Sydney have synthesised evasin proteins found in tick saliva, which offer a promising pathway for anti-inflammatory medicine.
The wildlife trade encompasses all major branches of the biological tree of life
The wildlife trade is a multibillion-dollar industry that threatens biodiversity.
High-speed femtosecond laser plasmonic lithography of graphene oxide film
Micro/nanoprocessing of graphene is attractive in both fundamental and applied science due to its modulation of material properties.
Mapping the neurons of the rat heart in 3D
A team of researchers has developed a virtual 3D heart, digitally showcasing the heart's unique network of neurons for the first time.
New 5G switch provides 50 times more energy efficiency than currently exists
As 5G hits the market, new US Army-funded research has developed a radio-frequency switch that is more than 50 times more energy efficient than what is used today.
Researchers capture rarely heard narwhal vocalizations (video)
With the help of Inuit hunters, geophysicists recently recorded the various calls, buzzes, clicks and whistles of narwhals as they summered in a Greenland fjord.
Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort.
It may take up to a year to get through elective surgeries due to COVID-19
A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers found that it may take between seven and 16 months for surgeons to complete the backlog of elective orthopaedic surgeries that have been suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover the ability to contract
A recent study from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore has shown that rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover their ability to self-contract.
Nanoneedles to increase the capacity and robustness of digital memories
Researchers have developed a new technique to locally modify the properties of a metamagnetic material.
New 5G switches bring better battery life, higher bandwidth and speeds
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Lille in France have built a new component that will more efficiently allow access to the highest 5G frequencies in a way that increases devices' battery life and speeds up how quickly we can do things like stream high-definition media.
Research highlights immune molecule's complex role in Huntington's disease
Knocking out the immune cytokine IL-6 exacerbates symptoms in HD model mice and affects neural connection genes, a new study finds.
Watch: Babies know when you imitate them -- and like it
Six-month old infants recognize when adults imitate them, and perceive imitators as more friendly, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden.
Even natural products can be harmful for the unborn child
Plant products ingested by pregnant women through their diet are broken down by the intestinal microbiota into chemical substances, some of which can cross the placental barrier and reach the fetus.
Bumblebees speed up flowering
When pollen is in short supply, bumblebees damage plant leaves in a way that accelerates flower production, as an ETH research team headed up by Consuelo De Moraes and Mark Mescher has demonstrated.
Miniature rock art expands horizons
Australian archaeologists have discovered some of the most detailed examples of rare, small-scale rock art in the form of miniature stencils in a rockshelter traditionally owned by the Marra people.
Critical transition theory shows flickering in heart before atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation ranks among the most common heart conditions, and episodes are difficult to predict.
Metal collector made of bacteria
Bacteria, fungi and plants sometimes produce metal-binding substances that can be harnessed, for example for the extraction of raw materials, for their separation, for cleaning soils or for medical purposes.
Similar to humans, chimpanzees develop slowly
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have systematically investigated developmental milestones in wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park (Ivory Coast) and found that they develop slowly, requiring more than five years to reach key motor, communication and social milestones.
Researchers use drones, machine learning to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines
Using advanced machine learning, drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
Birds, bees and butter -- new study shows biodiversity critical for shea crop in Africa
A new study shows that shea yields are higher in more diverse habitats in sub-Saharan Africa, which has important implications for a crop that is typically harvested and sold by women in rural areas, and which helps finance education for children.
Increased usability and precision in vascular imaging
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent.
New method allows minimally invasive cell sampling
Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed one of the first non-destructive methods of extracting multiple samples from a cell over time.
NUI Galway research highlights the economic costs of workplace bullying
Findings from a new NUI Galway study on workplace bullying, led by Dr John Cullinan of the Discipline of Economics and Dr Margaret Hodgins from the Discipline of Health Promotion, has been published in the journal Occupational Medicine.
Mathematics can save lives at sea
An international research collaboration led by ETH Zurich and MIT has developed a mathematical method that can speed up search and rescue operations at sea.
Stimulating immune cleanup crew offers a possibility for treating rare disorder
Compounds that mimicked the process known as efferocytosis alleviated signs of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type-1 in an animal model, according to work led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis.
What do ants and light rays have in common when they pass through lenses?
Foraging trails of ants across a lens-shaped substrate that slows them (Velcro) down diverge away from the ''lens'' center more for the convex than for the concave lens, similar to the behavior of light.
Limit fire service instructors' exposures per month to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
New research published in Experimental Physiology suggests that fire service instructors are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases due to higher levels of inflammation in their blood, and so their exposure should be limited to nine exposures per month.
Early African Muslims had a halal -- and cosmopolitan diet -- discovery of thousands of ancient animal
Early Muslim communities in Africa ate a cosmopolitan diet as the region became a trading centre for luxury goods, the discovery of thousands of ancient animal bones has shown.
New research identifies two drug classes that could be re-purposed for T1D treatment
Researchers from the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute (IBRI) and Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Center for Diabetes Research, identified two classes of compounds that prevent most of the effects of interferon-α (IFNα) on human beta cells, paving the way for potential future clinical trials of treatments for type 1 diabetes (T1D).
NUS researchers develop a new library of atomically thin 2D materials
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have created a new collection of atomically thin two-dimensional materials.
High-security identification that cannot be counterfeited
Researchers from University of Tsukuba have used the principles that underpin the whispering-gallery effect to create an unbeatable anti-counterfeiting system.
Beware of false negatives in diagnostic testing of COVID-19
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that the chance of a false negative result -- when a virus is not detected in a person who actually is, or recently has been, infected -- is greater than 1 in 5 and, at times, far higher.
Stem cells from placental amniotic membrane slow lung scarring in pulmonary fibrosis
In a study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), researchers show for the first time how stem cells collected from human amniotic membrane can slow the progression of scarring in pulmonary fibrosis.
Cultural diversity in chimpanzees
Termite fishing by chimpanzees was thought to occur in only two forms with one or multiple tools, from either above-ground or underground termite nests.
Ozone disinfectants can be used to sterilize cloth and n95 masks against COVID-19
Ozone gas has been shown to kill the SARS coronavirus in at least seventeen separate studies [1, 2].
Researchers find no benefit for treatment used to avoid surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm
A new landmark study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that patients with a vascular condition, called abdominal aortic aneurysm, received no benefits from taking a common antibiotic drug to reduce inflammation.
Humans have beneficial bacteria uniquely adapted for life in our noses
Researchers publishing May 26 in the journal Cell Reports suggest that some of these 'good' bacteria residing in our guts, genital tracts, and skin also have a niche in our noses.
Dinosaur-dooming asteroid struck earth at 'deadliest possible' angle
New simulations from Imperial College London have revealed the asteroid that doomed the dinosaurs struck Earth at the 'deadliest possible' angle.
Montefiore and Einstein test a new drug combination to conquer COVID-19
Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine have begun the next stage of the Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT), to evaluate treatment options for people hospitalized with severe COVID-19 infection.
New type of coupled electronic-structural waves discovered in magnetite
An international team of scientists uncovered exotic quantum properties hidden in magnetite, the oldest magnetic material known to mankind.
Quantum simulators for gauge theories
To simulate in a laboratory what happens in particle accelerators has been an ambitious goal in the study of the fundamental forces of nature pursued by high-energy physicists for many years.
The prevention of childhood obesity would require stricter advertising regulations
Spain ranks fifth among European countries for childhood obesity. Sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks are consumed by 81% of Spanish children weekly.
Patient notes could offer solution to the 'missing' Coronavirus diagnoses
GP's notes currently unavailable to medical researchers could provide clues to help manage major health crises -- like COVID-19.
Next-gen laser facilities look to usher in new era of relativistic plasmas research
Chirped pulse amplification increases the strength of laser pulses in many of today's highest-powered research lasers, and as next-generation laser facilities look to push beam power, physicists expect a new era for studying plasmas.
MAVEN maps electric currents around mars that are fundamental to atmospheric loss
Five years after NASA's MAVEN spacecraft entered into orbit around Mars, data from the mission has led to the creation of a map of electric current systems in the Martian atmosphere.

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