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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 27, 2020


Studying the development of ovarian cancer with organoids
Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute have modeled the development and progression of high-grade serous ovarian cancer in mini-versions, or organoids, of the female reproductive organs of the mouse.
Technology is studied that could save 12% of the energy used in pressurized irrigation
A study, performed in two Andalusian provinces, analyzed the potential of producing electricity by means of recovering hydraulic energy by implanting new technology based on pumps working as turbines
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Storm Bertha organizing
The second tropical storm of the North Atlantic Ocean hurricane season has formed off the coast of South Carolina.
Physicists measure a short-lived radioactive molecule for first time
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have combined the power of a super collider with techniques of laser spectroscopy to precisely measure a short-lived radioactive molecule, radium monofluoride, for the first time.
Device simulates filtering and ion transport functions of human kidney
University of Arkansas researchers have developed a device that simulates the blood filtering and ion transport functions of the human kidney.
In stressed ecosystems Jurassic dinosaurs turned to scavenging, maybe even cannibalism
Among dinosaurs of ancient Colorado, scavenging and possibly cannibalism were responses to a resource-scarce environment, according to a study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stephanie Drumheller of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and colleagues.
Women and minorities lacking in research and clinical trials for new cardiometabolic medications
Women and minorities have low participation rates in pivotal trials for new medications.
Caveolin binding motif in Na/K-ATPase required for stem cell differentiation in animals
New findings reveal the importance of the Na/K-ATPase protein in stem cell differentiation and organogenesis, in a study led by scientists at Marshall University that involves the scaffolding function of the Na/K-ATPase.
'Knowing how' is in your brain
A new study has found the brain programs that code the sequence of steps in performing a complex procedure.
New antiviral, antibacterial surface could reduce spread of infections in hospitals
The novel coronavirus pandemic has caused an increased demand for antimicrobial treatments that can keep surfaces clean, particularly in health care settings.
Researchers flag similarities between COVID-19 deaths and severe rheumatic illnesses
Rheumatologists at the University of Alberta are flagging similarities between the deaths of some COVID-19 patients and those with rheumatic illnesses, and are testing proven rheumatic treatments to see whether they help against the pandemic virus.
Canadian study of critically ill patients with COVID-19 found lower death rate
A Canadian case series of all patients with COVID-19 admitted to six intensive care units (ICUs) in Metro Vancouver found patient outcomes were substantially better than reported in other jurisdictions.
How do we disconnect from the environment during sleep and under anesthesia?
A series of new studies by researchers at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience finds, among other important discoveries, that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter secreted in response to stress, lies at the heart of our ability to ''shut off'' our sensory responses and sleep soundly.
June's SLAS discovery features the special collection, 'ion channels and relevant drug screening approaches'
In this issue, Guest Editor Veli-Pekka Jaakola, Ph.D., (Confo Therapeutics, Belgium) highlights a series of articles focused on new screening tools and assays that find new chemical matter for medically relevant membrane protein targets
Cosmic bursts unveil universe's missing matter
Astronomers have used mysterious fast radio bursts to solve a decades-old mystery of 'missing matter', long predicted to exist in the Universe but never detected -- until now.
CSIC researchers use whole living cells as 'templates' to seek for bioactive molecules
A study performed by researchers at the Institute for Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia (IQAC-CSIC) from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) pioneers the use of whole living cells (human lung adenocarcinoma) in dynamic combinatorial chemistry systems.
Cyclones can damage even distant reefs
Big and strong cyclones can harm coral reefs as far as 1000 kilometres away from their paths, new research shows.
Exploring the use of 'stretchable' words in social media
An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as 'duuuuude,' 'heyyyyy,' or 'noooooooo.' Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020.
Biomarkers may help us understand recovery time after concussion
A blood test may help researchers understand which people may take years to recover from concussion, according to a study published in the May 27, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Search-and-rescue algorithm identifies hidden'traps' in ocean waters
Researchers at MIT, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and Virginia Tech have developed a technique that they hope will help first responders quickly zero in on regions of the sea where missing objects or people are likely to be.
The asteroids Ryugu and Bennu were formed by the destruction of a large asteroid
What is the origin of the asteroids Bennu and Ryugu, and of their spinning-top shape?
The evolutionary puzzle of the mammalian ear
How could the tiny parts of the ear adapt independently to the diverse functional and environmental regimes encountered in mammals?
Patterns in crop data reveal new insight about plants and their environments
A new study unearthed patterns in datasets collected on rice plants across Asia that allowed researchers to develop a matrix to predict the traits of rice plants depending on their genetics and environment.
Study shows patients with hemorrhagic brain disease have disordered gut microbiomes
A new study shows that people with a rare genetic disease that causes bleeding in the brain have gut microbiomes distinct from those without the disease.
Doxycycline ineffective at shrinking aortic aneurysms in two-year study
Patients with a vascular condition called abdominal aortic aneurysm did not benefit from taking the common antibiotic doxycycline for two years to shrink the aneurysm when compared to those who took a placebo, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
Yale finds a (much) earlier birth date for tectonic plates
Yale geophysicists reported that Earth's ever-shifting, underground network of tectonic plates was firmly in place more than 4 billion years ago -- at least a billion years earlier than scientists generally thought.
Finding working capital is key to small businesses efforts as reopening accelerates
Small businesses are suffering affer a long pandemic shutdown and they are worried about what will be needed as they begin to reopen.
Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports.
Loss of smell, taste changes associated with COVID-19: Canadian study
Loss of smell (anosmia) and changes in taste (dysgeusia) were strongly associated with SARS-CoV-2, according to a Canadian study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/05/27/cmaj.200869.
Finnish study proposes a model to predict cryptocurrency defaults
University of Vaasa researchers propose a model that is capable of explaining 87 percent of cryptocurrency bankruptcies after only one month of trading.
Winds spread PFAS pollution far from a manufacturing facility
Concerns about environmental and health risks of some fluorinated carbon compounds used to make non-stick coatings and fire-fighting foams have prompted manufacturers to develop substitutes, but these replacements are increasingly coming under fire themselves.
Molecular pair offers potential for Parkinson's treatment, finds NTU Singapore-Harvard study
A promising molecular pair has offered hope that could lead to the development of a new treatment to slow down Parkinson's disease, a study by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University has found.
New understanding of RNA movements can be used to treat cancer
Research from Karolinska Institutet published today in Nature shows that an RNA molecule involved in preventing tumour formation can change its structure and thereby control protein production in the cell.
Clean without scrubbing and using chemicals
Dresden scientists have developed a self-cleaning metallic surface. A project team of Technische Universität Dresden and the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS structured an aluminium plate with a laser process in such a way that water droplets no longer adhere and dirt particles can be removed from the surface - completely without chemical cleaning agents or additional effort.
Under pressure, black holes feast
A new, Yale-led study shows that some supermassive black holes actually thrive under pressure.
Impact of a health system's three-pronged strategy to address the opioid epidemic
In the past two decades more than 700,000 people have died from a drug overdose in the United States.
Anxiety needs global health attention
Identifying anxiety in those with depression could be key to developing successful programmes for tackling mental health problems in low and middle income countries (LMICs), according to a new study.
Elucidation of nanostructures in practical heterogeneous catalysts
The nanostructure of the heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalyst was clarified on the basis of cutting-edge analytical techniques.
Tuning the surface gives variations to metal foils
IBS researchers reported how to give variations to single crystalline metal foils.
Study uncovers gender roles in physics lab courses
Men are overrepresented not only in number but in high-ranking positions within the physics community, according to a new study published May 26 in the journal Physics Education Research.
What's the secret behind the world's stickiest brands?
Sticky customer journeys do not arise from consistently good customer experiences -- instead, they are intentionally chaotic, maddening, and unpredictable.
World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from Scotland
A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the world's oldest 'bug' -- older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid or other related creepy-crawly, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.
Describing clinical characteristics of patients with asymptomatic vs symptomatic COVID-19 in China
Clinical characteristics of patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic COVID-19 are described in this case series from Wuhan, China.
Women's health services adapting well to COVID-19, but concerns remain for long-term
The majority of women's healthcare units in the UK, including services such as maternity and gynaecological cancers, have adapted well to the initial COVID-19 outbreak, according to a new survey by University of Warwick researchers.
Skoltech scientists get a sneak peek of a key process in battery 'life'
Researchers from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology (CEST) visualized the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase on battery-grade carbonaceous electrode materials using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM).
Superworms digest plastic, with help from their bacterial sidekicks
Resembling giant mealworms, superworms (Zophobas atratus) are beetle larvae that are often sold in pet stores as feed for reptiles, fish and birds.
Treatment shows promise in treating deadly brain cancer
In this study, researchers investigated if specific targeting of CD133+ glioblastoma with cutting-edge immunotherapy drugs could eradicate the most aggressive subpopulation of cells in the tumor.
No-deductible preventive drugs lower costs, increase medication use for low-income diabetes patients
For patients with diabetes -- especially those with lower incomes -- preventive drug lists (PDLs) of essential medications available with no deductible can reduce out-of-pocket costs while increasing use of important treatments, reports a study in a June supplement to Medical Care.
Study: Ultra-thin fibres designed to protect nerves after brain surgery
The drug nimodipine could prevent nerve cells from dying after brain surgery.
Study finds large disparities in use of medications for opioid use disorder in pregnancy
Black non-Hispanic and Hispanic women with opioid use disorder (OUD) are significantly less likely to receive or to consistently use any medication to treat their opioid use disorder during pregnancy than their white non-Hispanic counterparts, Mass General researchers have found.
Public parks guaranteeing sustainable well-being
An international team led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has ascertained how green spaces contribute to the well-being of city-dwellers.
In chimpanzees, females contribute to the protection of the territory
Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, extensively studied several neighboring groups of western chimpanzees and their findings reveal that females and even the entire group may play a more important role in between-group competition than previously thought.
Study investigates Atlantic Rainforest regeneration in the state of São Paulo
The same procedure will be extended to the entire Atlantic Rainforest biome, remnants of which are located on the coast of 17 Brazilian states.
Strong convictions can blind us to information that challenges them
When people are highly confident in a decision, they take in information that confirms their decision, but fail to process information which contradicts it, finds a UCL brain imaging study, published in Nature Communications.
An exploratory study of metformin and rapamycin as maintenance therapy
Volume 11, Number 21 of @Oncotarget reported that eligible patients with stable or responding mPDA after 6 months on chemotherapy were randomized 1:1 to metformin alone or with rapamycin, stratified by prior treatment with FOLFIRINOX.
'Nature's antifreeze' provides formula for more durable concrete
Secrets to cementing the sustainability of our future infrastructure may come from nature, such as proteins that keep plants and animals from freezing in extremely cold conditions.
Depression viewed differently when thought to be biological
People who believe more strongly that depression is biologically caused also tend to think it is more severe and long lasting, compared to those who see less of a role for biological causes, a new Rutgers study finds.
These tiny, self-assembling traps capture PFAS
A study shows that self-assembling molecular traps can be used to capture PFAS -- dangerous pollutants that have contaminated drinking water supplies around the world.
Multifunctional e-glasses monitor health, protect eyes, control video game
Fitness tracker bracelets and watches provide useful information, such as step count and heart rate, but they usually can't provide more detailed data about the wearer's health.
Two anti-inflammatory drugs found that inhibit the replication of the COVID-19 virus
Researchers at the URV have used computer techniques to analyse whether 6,466 drugs authorized by various drug agencies for both human and veterinary use could be used to inhibit the M-pro enzyme.
Follow-up treatments after opioid overdose rare among insured patients
The majority of commercially insured patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for an opioid overdose didn't receive the timely follow-up care known to help prevent a future overdose or death.
Electronic cigarettes trigger an inflammatory response that may set the stage for gum disease
The oral microbiomes of 25 otherwise healthy participants who use e-cigarettes daily closely match those seen in patients with gum disease, a new study shows.
Altered sense of taste present in half of COVID-19 cases
A systematic review of COVID-19 cases finds nearly half of patients reported changes to or complete loss of their sense of taste.
First map of proinsulin's 'social network' reveals new drug target for type 2 diabetes
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have mapped for the first time the vast network of proteins that interact with proinsulin, the protein the body normally processes into insulin.
Prevalence of 'silent' COVID-19 infection may be much higher than thought
The prevalence of 'silent' symptomless COVID-19 infection may be much higher than thought, reveals a study charting the enforced isolation of cruise ship passengers during the current pandemic, and published online in the journal Thorax.
Target trials support drug safety in pregnant patients
Out of concern for fetal safety, pregnant people have typically been excluded from drug trials.
Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics
Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain.
Framework helps clinicians identify serious spinal pathology
Rehabilitation clinicians and other health care professionals now have a framework for assessing and managing people who may have serious spinal pathologies.
Van der Waals junction spin valves without spacer layer
Distinct from traditional spin valves with a sandwich structure consisting of two ferromagnetic metals decoupled by the insertion of a non-magnetic spacer, recently, a research team led by Prof.
No laughing matter
A new study involving a scientific analysis of the prevalence of 'LOL' in students' text messages demonstrates important potential applications for classroom learning.
Avalanche photodiode from UVA and UT-Austin breaks performance record for LiDAR receivers
Electrical and computer engineers at the University of Virginia and University of Texas-Austin have developed an avalanche photodiode that achieved record performance and has the potential to transform next generation night-vision imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) receivers.
New technique offers higher resolution molecular imaging and analysis
The new approach from Northwestern Engineering could help researchers understand more complicated biomolecular interactions and characterize cells and diseases at the single-molecule level.
A new method for predicting the evolution of melanoma emerges
Research led by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country estimates that determining the mutational load of the mutation of the BRAF (BRAF-V600E) gene could predict whether the melanoma will progress to metastasis
Extraction of skin interstitial fluid using microneedle patches
Researchers at the Terasaki Institute enhance tool for extraction of samples used in monitoring patient health.
Initial Upper Paleolithic technology reached North China by ~41,000 years ago
A wave of new technology in the Late Paleolithic had reached North China by around 41,000 years ago, according to a study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fei Peng of the Minzu University of China, Beijing and colleagues.
Study shows erosion of ozone layer responsible for mass extinction event
Researchers at the University of Southampton have shown that an extinction event 360 million years ago, that killed much of the Earth's plant and freshwater aquatic life, was caused by a brief breakdown of the ozone layer that shields the Earth from damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
Gene inactivation of PTEN drives cancer predisposition
An international team of researchers co-led by Cleveland Clinic have identified why patients without PTEN mutations may still experience the high cancer risk associated with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.
Digital contact tracing for COVID-19: an analysis of strengths and limitations
An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) analyzes the strengths and limitations of digital contact tracing for people infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to help governments decide if and how they might adopt this technology.
Oxygen-excess oxides in Earth's mid-mantle facilitate the ascent of deep oxygen
Under the conditions of Earth's middle mantle, scientists discovered an oxygen-excess phase, (Mg,Fe)2O3+δ (0 < δ < 1) that can be formed with under-saturated water at >1000 kilometers depths.
New cancer immunotherapy targeting myeloid cells slows tumor growth
Checkpoint inhibitors, a type of immunotherapy, that target myeloid immune cells and slow tumor growth were discovered by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions.
Pediatric scoring scale helps surgeons decide whether to operate during COVID-19 delays
As health care providers observe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) affecting children differently than adults, pediatric surgeons in Chicago have modified an evaluation tool for use in pediatric patients that allows surgeons in every pediatric specialty to prioritize nonemergency ('elective') operations during all phases of the pandemic.
Age, gender and culture 'predict loneliness'
Young people, men and people in 'individualistic' societies report higher levels of loneliness, according to a large-scale global study.
A bio-inspired addition to concrete stops the damage caused by freezing and thawing
Concrete is one of the most durable building materials used in modern-day infrastructures, but it has a weakness -- ice -- which can cause it to crumble.
Low vaccination rates and 'measles parties' fueled 2019 measles outbreak in NYC
An analysis of the 2018-2019 measles outbreak in New York City identifies factors that made the outbreak so severe: delayed vaccination of young children combined with increased contact among this age group, likely through ''measles parties'' designed to purposely infect children.
University of Cincinnati study uncovers clues to COVID-19 in the brain
A study by University of Cincinnati researchers and three Italian institutions reviewing neuroimaging and neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19 may shed light on the virus's impact on the central nervous system.
A potential explanation for urban smog
The effect of nitric acid on aerosol particles in the atmosphere may offer an explanation for the smog seen engulfing cities on frosty days.
Augmented reality can improve online shopping, study finds
A recent survey found that online shoppers return 70% of the clothing they order, more than any other category of purchase.
Palliative care for heart failure patients may lower rehospitalization risk and improve outcomes
Heart failure patients who received palliative care -- focused on pain relief, emotional support and quality of life while hospitalized -- were less likely to be readmitted within six months.
Study reports nursing home hip fracture rates stay persistently high
A recent study of hip fracture rates in nursing homes in the U.S. reports a slight rise in the rate of hip fractures among long-stay residents in recent years.
New evidence for a blood-based biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
Neurofilament light chain (NfL) has great potential as a biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer's disease and could be also useful for monitoring treatment response for that condition.
Yale researchers find where stress lives
Yale researchers have found a neural home of the feeling of stress people experience, an insight that may help people deal with the debilitating sense of fear and anxiety that stress can evoke, Yale researchers report May 27 in the journal Nature Communications.
Mouse model mimics SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans
A mouse model of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reproduces features observed in human patients, researchers report May 26 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.
A special elemental magic
Kyoto University physicists develop a 'nuclear periodic table'. While the traditional table is based on the behavior of electrons in an atom, this new table is based on the protons in the nucleus.
New protocol for organic synthesis using organoboron compounds and visible-light
The generation of alkyl radicals was achieved by direct visible-light excitation of the organoborate complex, which was designed and synthesized from 'boracene,' which has a boron atom in the tetracene-like skeleton.
Study shows domestic violence reports on the rise as COVID-19 keeps people at home
A UCLA-led research team has found an increase in domestic violence reports in Los Angeles and Indianapolis since the stay-at-home restrictions were implemented in March.
Pregnancy reprograms breast cells, reducing cancer risk
Women who are pregnant before the age of 25 have a decreased risk of breast cancer throughout their lives.
June's SLAS Technology highlights papers authored by SLAS2019 Ignite award winner
The June issue of SLAS Technology features two related research papers authored by Georges Muller, Ph.D., (SEED Biosciences, Switzerland) the SLAS2019 Ignite Award winner and a top ten 2020 SLAS Innovation Award finalist.
Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle strength
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness.
Training bystanders to intervene will help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, study shows
Empowering people to intervene when they witness unacceptable behaviour can help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, a new study has found.
COVID-19 vaccine development: New guidelines for ethical approach to infecting trial volunteers
Allowing consenting volunteers to be deliberately infected with COVID-19 for the purposes of developing a vaccine could be done ethically and potentially speed up its development, a University of Warwick researcher has argued in new research.
Taking inventory of which drugs the world is using to treat COVID-19
New research catalogued every COVID treatment documented in medical literature so far and found physicians have reported on the use of more than 100 different off-label and experimental treatments.
Dairy consumption ineffective in preventing age-related bone loss or fractures
Dairy products provide more bone-beneficial nutrients than any other food group.
A few months of vaping puts healthy people on the brink of oral disease
The collection of oral bacteria in daily e-cigarette users' mouths is teeming with potent infection-causing organisms that put vapers at substantial risk for ailments ranging from gum disease to cancer, researchers found.
Information technology played key role in growth of ancient civilizations
A new paper in Nature Communications shows the ability to store and process information was as critical to the growth of early human societies as it is today.
An imperative for psychiatrists to act now
How psychiatrists can contribute to diminish the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed.
Fishing less could be a win for both lobstermen and endangered whales
A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that New England's historic lobster fishery may turn a higher profit by operating with less gear in the water and a shorter season.
An analysis of psychological meta-analyses reveals a reproducibility problem
Meta-analysis research studies in psychology aren't always reproducible due to a lack of transparency of reporting in the meta-analysis process, according to a new study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Esther Maassen of Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and colleagues.
Study finds TAVR is safe treatment for patients with bicuspid valve disease
For many patients with a bicuspid aortic valve that needs replacing, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) appears to be a safe treatment option with low complication rates, according to a study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
A new potential target for the treatment of alcohol-withdrawal induced depression
Researchers from Pennsylvania State University have discovered that alcohol withdrawal impacts somatostatin neurons in key brain regions associated with emotional processing and addiction.
Simple and readily available saline solution can reliably transport COVID-19 samples to testing labs
In a new peer-reviewed study appearing in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, investigators report that a simple salt solution commonly found in hospitals and clinical laboratories, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), can be used as a medium to reliably transport coronavirus-contaminated specimens to the testing laboratory for periods of up to 18 hours, which is often needed in busy clinical settings.
Volcanic eruptions reduce global rainfall
POSTECH Professor Seung-Ki Min's joint research team identifies the mechanism behind the reduction in precipitation after volcanic eruptions.
Scientists devise a way to determine the viability of predicted 2D materials
An international team of researchers from Russia, Sweden and South Korea has proposed a new way to test the structural stability of predicted 2D materials.
New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth.
How preserve the properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments?
A new technique preserves the anti-carcinogenic properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments.
How a network of hospitals reduced average age at cerebral palsy diagnosis to 9.5 months
Five hospital systems in the United States have become the first in the world to successfully implement, in clinical practice, international CP diagnosis guidelines that were released in 2017.
Nordic countries struggle with a severe drug overdose problem
Despite the fact that the Nordic countries are often seen as ideal in practically every global ranking of quality of life and social equality, the number of drug-related deaths in these countries are among the highest in Europe.
New study evaluates facial feminization outcomes, benefits for transgender women
Previous studies have reported improved quality of life and mental health in transgender women undergoing facial feminization surgery (FFS) surgery to provide a more feminine facial appearance.
Finding a genus home for Alaska's dinosaurs
A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus Edmontosaurus, and not to the genus recently proposed by scientists in 2015.
Diversity of applicants to surgical residency, fellowship programs
Researchers looked at trends in diversity by sex and race/ethnicity among applicants to US surgical residency and fellowship programs from 2008-2018 to see if diversity was increasing.
Same father, same face
Artificial intelligence reveals mechanism for kin selection in a wild primate.
PKU-led team found effective SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies
A joint research team led by Sunney Xie, Director of Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics (ICG) at Peking University (PKU) has identified multiple highly potent neutralizing antibodies against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of the respiratory disease COVID-19.
Bullying is common factor in LGBTQ youth suicides, YSPH study finds
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers.
ADHD: genomic analysis in samples of Neanderthals and modern humans
The frequency of genetic variants associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has decreased progressively in the evolutionary human lineage from the Palaeolithic to nowadays, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
Four of ten adults worldwide have functional gastrointestinal disorders
For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders of varying severity.
As businesses reopen, it's crucial we wear masks, safely distance
In a perspective piece published today in the journal Science, UC San Diego experts describe in detail the growing evidence that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, can be spread by asymptomatic people via aerosols -- a reality that deeply underscores the ongoing importance of regular widespread testing, wearing masks and physical distancing to reduce the spread of the virus.
CU Anschutz surgeons study guidelines for treating cancer patients during pandemic
Today, new research published in Annals of Surgery from the University of Colorado Department of Surgery at the Anschutz Medical Campus provides guidance on clinical decision-making in regards to treating pancreatic cancer patients during the covid-19 pandemic.
Masks reduce airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2
Growing evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, can be spread by asymptomatic people via aerosols -- a reality that deeply underscores the ongoing importance of regular widespread testing, wearing masks and physical distancing to reduce the spread of the virus, say Kimberly Prather and colleagues in a new Perspective.
1ST COVID autopsy series by LSUHealthNO pathologists reveals new cardiopulmonary findings
LSU Health New Orleans pathologists performed the first series of autopsies on African Americans who died from COVID-19 in New Orleans, and their findings provide new and critical information to guide patient management.

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