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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 28, 2020


Tel Aviv University and IDC Herzliya researchers thwart large-scale cyberattack threat
A new study provides new details of a technique that could have allowed a relatively small number of computers to carry out DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks on a massive scale, overwhelming targets with false requests for information until they were thrown offline.
ESPRESSO confirms the presence of an Earth around the nearest star
The existence of a planet the size of Earth around the closest star in the solar system, Proxima Centauri, has been confirmed by a team of scientists including researchers from the University of Geneva.
'Bottom-heavy squirmers' adopt characteristic group behaviours
Through research published in EPJ E, researchers find that swimming, bottom-heavy particles will collectively spend most of their time in one of two states, between which some intriguing behaviours can emerge.
As hospitals walk the tightrope of patient data-sharing, one system offers a new balance
Every major medical center in America sits on a gold mine of patient data that could be worth millions of dollars to companies that could use it to develop new treatments and technologies.
Novel targeted drug induced positive response for VHL-associated kidney cancer
In an international trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with MK-6482, the small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a was well tolerated and resulted in clinical responses for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
Two paths better than one for treating patients with heart stents
Pairing a blood-thinning drug with aspirin daily for patients who have an angioplasty with a stent can contribute to better health outcomes, including lower risk of death, than aspirin alone, according to a recent study by cardiologists at the University of Alberta and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute.
Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip.
Increased activity not always the best advice for neck and back pain
The Norwegian Directorate for Health and Human Affairs generally recommends more physical activity and less sitting time.
Recurrent positive RT-PCR results for COVID-19 in discharged patients
Patients with COVID-19 who were discharged from the hospital and had recurrent positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results were the focus of this case series.
Tackling airborne transmission of COVID-19 indoors
Preventing airborne transmission of Covid-19 should be the next front of the battle against the virus, argue experts from the University of Surrey.
Beyond the garnish: Will a new type of produce get the microgreen light?
Microgreens. They're leafy green vegetables that are relatively new to the dining room, but a study by a Colorado State University team indicates that they will be welcome company at the table.
An imbalance of electrons in the liver may be a common risk factor for disease
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered an unexpected connection between an imbalance of electrons in liver cells and many metabolic problems that increase the risk for conditions such as cardiovascular disease and fatty liver disease.
Adolescent exposure to anesthetics may cause alcohol use disorder, new research shows
Early exposure to anesthetics may make adolescents more susceptible to developing alcohol use disorder (AUD), according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Cancer drugs cause large cells that resist treatment; scientist aims to stop it
Fueled by genetic changes due to cancer therapy itself, rogue cells may become very large with twice or quadruple the number of chromosomes found in healthy cells.
The effectiveness of a heating system is validated, heating air from solar radiation
The device, which takes advantage of heat generated on the outer layer of building facades, could cover the heating required to ventilate a building for up to 75% of the days in a cold season.
Stronger tropical cyclones strengthen the Kuroshio Current, further heating high latitudes
As the intensity and frequency of the strongest cyclones east of Taiwan have increased, so has the strength of the Kuroshio current, a Pacific current responsible for redistributing heat throughout the western North Pacific Ocean.
Biophysicists reveal how optogenetic tool works
An international research team has for the first time obtained the structure of the light-sensitive sodium-pumping KR2 protein in its active state.
The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed
Lobachevsky University scientists in collaboration with their colleagues from Russia, Italy, China and the United States have proposed the concept of a memristive neurohybrid chip to be used in compact biosensors and neuroprostheses.
NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world.
Cancer doctors call for more training in palliative care and delivery of 'bad news'
Oncologists who practice and teach at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center are calling on medical oncology training programs to invest substantially more time educating physicians about palliative care and how to talk to patients about 'bad news.'
Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles
Argonne researchers have created a new kind of self-healing active material out of 'microspinners,' which self-assemble under a magnetic field to form a lattice.
Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees.
gnomAD Consortium releases its first major studies of human genetic variation
For the last eight years, the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) Consortium (and its predecessor, the Exome Aggregation Consortium, or ExAC), has been working with geneticists around the world to compile and study more than 125,000 exomes and 15,000 whole genomes from populations around the world.
Featured research from NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE
Press materials are now available for NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition.
Ludwig Lausanne study charts the immune landscape of multiple brain cancers
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has profiled, in a sweeping comparative analysis, the distinct immune landscapes of tumors that arise in the brain, or gliomas, and those that metastasize to the organ from the lungs, breast and skin.
Colorado tool, My-DST, may pick best multiple myeloma treatment
Response of liquid biopsies to approved drugs can help show resistance, predict response.
Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant -- which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria -- during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites.
Convenient location of a near-threshold proton-emitting resonance in 11B
Polish scientists working in Poland, France and USA explained the mysterious β-delayed proton decay of the neutron halo ground state of 11Be.
Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.
Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions.
Previously claimed memory boosting font 'Sans Forgetica' does not actually boost memory
It was previously claimed that the font Sans Forgetica could enhance people's memory for information, however researchers from the University of Warwick and the University of Waikato, New Zealand, have found after carrying out numerous experiments that the font does not enhance memory.
Those with IDD more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without IDD.
New report discusses coffee's effect on digestion and digestive disorders
A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), entitled 'Coffee and its effect on digestion' reviews the latest research into coffee's effect on digestion, and indicates a potential protective effect against gallstones and gallstone disease and pancreatitis.
Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals
Cornell researchers combined genetic engineering, single-molecule tracking and protein quantitation to get a closer look at this mechanism and understand how it functions.
SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane
SUTD developed the embedded ink writing (EIW) method, enabling the direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators.
Smart sponge could clean up oil spills
Researchers have developed a highly porous smart sponge that selectively soaks up oil in water.
Global environmental changes are leading to shorter, younger trees -- new study
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees with broad impacts on global ecosystems, scientists say.
Immunotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced bladder cancer
An immunotherapy drug called 'avelumab' has been shown to significantly improve survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Cancer Centre, UK.
A small twist leads to a big reaction
In proteins, amino acids are held together by amide bonds.
New 'whirling' state of matter discovered in an element of the periodic table
The strongest permanent magnets today contain a mix of the elements neodymium and iron.
Well begun is half done? Skoltech researchers study the recipe for efficient protein synthesis
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues have studied more than 30 thousand variants of genetic sequences encoding two fluorescent proteins in order to determine which characteristics of mRNA and of the first dozen or so codons in it can increase the efficiency of translation.
'Distance' from the brightest stars is key to preserving primordial discs
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope was used to conduct a three-year study of the crowded, massive and young star cluster Westerlund 2.
PSA screening: Benefit does not outweigh harm
PSA screening: benefit does not outweigh harm Some men benefit from an earlier cancer diagnosis.
AMP releases preliminary results to nationwide SARS-CoV-2 molecular testing survey
The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, molecular diagnostic professional society, today released the preliminary results of its April 2020 SARS-CoV-2 Testing Survey for clinical laboratories.
In planet formation, it's location, location, location
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are finding that planets have a tough time forming in the rough-and-tumble central region of the massive, crowded star cluster Westerlund 2.
Material and genetic resemblance in the Bronze Age Southern Levant
Different 'Canaanite' people from the Bronze Age Southern Levant not only culturally, but also genetically resemble each other more than other populations.
Modified Parkinson's drug shows potential in treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) severely impairs the quality of life in patients and often leads to various liver complications.
New stroke guidelines aim to improve care amid COVID-19
Top stroke experts have issued new guidance to ensure stroke patients receive safe, timely care while preventing the transmission of COVID-19.
Modelling predicts COVID-19 resurgence if physical distancing relaxed
If physical distancing measures are relaxed too much or too quickly, Ontario could see hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients as well as exponential growth in deaths, concludes new University of Guelph research.
New drug combinations help overcome resistance to immunotherapy
A new study from researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center helps explain how disruptions in genes can lead to the resistance to one of the leading immunotherapies, PD-1 blockade, and how new drug combinations could help overcome resistance to the anti-PD-1 therapy in a mechanistically-based way.
Algorithm quickly simulates a roll of loaded dice
Approach for generating numbers at random may help analyses of complex systems, from Earth's climate to financial markets.
Mergers between galaxies trigger activity in their core
Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) play a major role in galaxy evolution.
Temple researchers track new path to therapeutic prevention of abdominal aortic aneurysm
New research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University suggests that abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can be prevented therapeutically.
Survey identifies learning opportunities related to health impacts of climate change
An international survey of Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE) membership found that the majority of members -- health professions schools and programs, including medical, nursing, and public health -- offer learning opportunities related to the health impacts of climate change, yet many also encountered challenges in instituting or developing curricula.
Yes, your dog wants to rescue you
Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help.
Hydropower plants to support solar and wind energy in West Africa
Study maps smart electricity mix composed of solar, wind and hydropower for West Africa -- regional cooperation can provide up to 60% reliable and clean electricity
Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
New marine molecules with therapy potential against Alzheimer's disease
An interdisciplinary research study of the University of Barcelona identified two potential candidates to treat Alzheimer's disease.
Restoring nerve-muscle communication in ALS
A new study finds that restoring the protein SV2 in a genetic form of ALS can correct abnormalities in transmission and even prevent cells from dying, providing a new target for future therapies.
Researchers identify mechanisms that make skin a protective barrier
A Mount Sinai research team has identified one of the mechanisms that establish the skin as a protective barrier, a breakthrough that is critical to understanding and treating common skin conditions including eczema and psoriasis, according to a study published Thursday, May 28, in the scientific journal Genes & Development.
Climate could cause abrupt British vegetation changes
Climate change could cause abrupt shifts in the amount of vegetation growing in parts of Great Britain, new research shows.
Users of high-potency cannabis four times more likely to report associated problems
Users of high-potency cannabis are four times more likely to report associated problems, and twice as likely to report anxiety disorder, than users of lower-potency strains, according to new research from the University of Bristol.
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.
Scientists analyze spatio-temporal differentiation of spring phenology in China from 1979 to 2018
By simulating the spatial and temporal features of the first bloom date (FBD) of typical vegetation for last four decades in China, Beijing normal university applied co-clustering analysis for high dimensional sparse matrix and revealed the spatio-temporal patterns of FBD in China in different time periods for the first time.
Multinational consortium reports COVID-19 impact on cancer patients
People with cancer sickened by COVID-19 have a crude death rate of 13%, according to the largest series of data released thus far from a multinational perspective.
The death marker protein cleans up your muscles after exercise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports have demonstrated that physical activity prompts a clean-up of muscles as the protein Ubiquitin tags onto worn-out proteins, causing them to be degraded.
New study examines impact of major life events on wellbeing
Researchers examined the effect of 18 major life events on wellbeing.
CT findings of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in children 'often negative'
The newest article in the American Journal of Roentgenology's open-access COVID-19 collection revealed a high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (n=30; 10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting that bilateral, lower lobe-predominant ground-glass opacities are common in the subset of children with positive CT findings.
New molecule stops drug cravings in mice, with fewer side effects
Duke University researchers have developed a synthetic molecule that selectively controls the physiological rewards of cocaine in mice.
High tech printing makes checking banknotes possible in the blink of an eye
New '3D micro-optic' security features in banknotes enable the general public to detect counterfeits reliably within a fraction of a second, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.
Electrogenetic device offers on-demand release of cellular insulin
Advancing the use of electrogenetics for remote-controlled medical intervention, researchers report a new device, tested in mouse models of type-1 diabetes, wirelessly coaxed bioengineered cells to release insulin, stabilizing the animals' blood glucose levels within minutes.
Topology sheds new light on synchronization in higher-order networks
Research led by Queen Mary University of London, proposes a novel 'higher-order' Kuramoto model that combines topology with dynamical systems and characterises synchronization in higher-order networks for the first time.
Mapping immune cells in brain tumors
It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary.
Blocking tumor signals can hinder cancer's spread
A University of Pennsylvania-led team used an inhibitor of an enzyme called p38α kinase to suppress the spread of melanoma to the lungs in a mouse model.
Study shows uptick in at-home pediatric fractures during COVID-19 pandemic
COVID-19 social distancing measures, including the closure of schools and parks and the indefinite cancellation of team sports, have led to a nearly 60% decrease overall in pediatric fractures but an increase in the proportion of fractures sustained at home, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood
A UC Davis MIND Institute study found that around 30% of young children with autism have less severe autism symptoms at age 6 than they did at age 3, with some children losing their autism diagnoses entirely.
Surgery and radiation do not extend survival in newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer
Women who present with a new diagnosis of breast cancer that is already in an advanced stage (stage IV) face questions about having surgery and radiation to the tumor in the breast (local therapy).
A deep dive into better understanding nitrogen impacts
This special issue presents a selection of 13 papers that advance our understanding of cascading consequences of reactive nitrogen species along their emission, transport, deposition, and the impacts in the atmosphere.
American Indians and Alaska Natives have disproportionately higher rates of CVD
Type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affects American Indians and Alaska Natives at three times the rate of white Americans.
A single proton can make a heck of a difference
Scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science and collaborators have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus -- transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen -- can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus.
New study finds cannibalism in predatory dinosaurs
Big theropod dinosaurs such as Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus ate pretty much everything -- including each other, according to a new study.
Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
A joint research team from POSTECH and KAIST develops self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors.
Exploiting viruses to attack cancer cells
Hokkaido University scientists have made an adenovirus that specifically replicates inside and kills cancer cells by employing special RNA-stabilizing elements.
Methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets
A study of the methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets has been published in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences recently.
SSRI antidepressants associated with increase in violent crime in some patients
Scientists have found that some people being treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have a greater tendency to commit violent crime.
Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer.
Changes in cropping methods, climate decoy pintail ducks into an ecological trap
After a severe drought gripped the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. and Canada in the 1980s, populations of almost all dabbling duck species that breed there have recovered.
Scientists discover a gene to stay thin
An international team of researchers with the participation of IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - reports the discovery of a thinness gene - ALK - conserved in evolution from flies to mice and importantly in very thin humans.
Balancing the economy while saving the planet
A new research-based framework lets companies make informed decisions balancing economic and sustainability factors when producing bio-chemicals.
New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions, prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms.
Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice
Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study.
Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world's first cities
Scientists analyzed DNA data from 110 skeletal remains in West Asia dated 3,000 to 7,500 years ago.
Student-school mismatch
Capable school graduates sometimes choose low-ranking universities which do not match their abilities.
Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals
A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food.
New view on how tissues flow in the embryo
Watching and measuring what happens in tissues inside the human embryo is currently not possible, and it's difficult to do in mammalian models.
Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom
The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom.
Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study.
NASA looks at Inland Rainfall from Post Tropical Cyclone Bertha
NASA's GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall generated from post-tropical cyclone Bertha as it continues to move toward the Great Lakes.
Sugars could be the key to an earlier, more accurate test for prostate cancer
A new type of test that uses complex sugars to detect prostate cancer earlier and with greater accuracy is being developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.
New technology enables fast protein synthesis
MIT chemists have developed a protocol to rapidly produce protein chains up to 164 amino acids long.
Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream
Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to the miners and communities near where mercury is used to extract gold from ore, but also to downstream communities hundreds of kilometers away where people eat mercury-contaminated river fish as part of their diet.
WPI-led research team shrinks breast cancer tumors in mice with targeted therapy
A team of researchers led by Worcester Polytechnic Institute Provost Wole Soboyejo attached anti-cancer agents to the hormone LHRH to create drugs that targeted triple-negative breast cancer, which typically does not respond to conventional targeted cancer therapies.
Human mobility and Western Asia's early state-level societies
The regions of Anatolia, the Northern Levant and the Caucasus played important roles in the development of complex social and cultural models during the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age.
Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
A study led by the University of Plymouth (UK) has for the first time provided evidence of where, when and how frequently species have adapted their ability to see in color.
Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex chromosomes)
A team of scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute has discovered how the X and Y chromosomes find one another, break, and recombine during meiosis even though they have little in common.
Wearing face masks at home might help ward off COVID-19 spread among family members
Wearing face masks at home might help ward off the spread of COVID-19 infection among family members living in the same household, but only before symptoms develop, suggests a study of Chinese families in Beijing, accepted for publication in BMJ Global Health.
Researchers find CBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
This study shows that in dogs diagnosed with arthritis, CBD treatment significantly improved quality of life as documented by both owner and veterinarian assessments.
Study finds surge in hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine prescriptions during COVID-19
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examines changes in prescription patterns in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Carfilzomib does not improve outcomes in newly diagnosed myeloma compared to bortezomib
The combination of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd) did not improve progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma absent a high-risk disease prognosis, compared with the standard of care -- bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd).
Unique 'home built' device provides fast disease analysis in kidneys affected by diabetes
The amount of scarring in damaged kidneys as a result of diabetes or acute injury, is a key factor in determining treatment.
Stanford Medicine study details molecular effects of exercise
A simple blood test may be able to determine how physically fit you are, according to a new study conducted by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
4,000 years of contact, conflict & cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous cultural changes.
UNH researchers find wildfires can alter arctic watersheds for 50 years
Climate change has contributed to the increase in the number of wildfires in the Arctic and can dramatically shift stream chemistry.
Stem cell treatments 'go deep' to regenerate sun-damaged skin
For a while now, some plastic surgeons have been using stem cells to treat aging, sun-damaged skin.
Imaging reveals unexpected contractions in the human placenta
High-resolution imaging of the human placenta provides new insights into blood circulation patterns that are crucial for fetal development, according to a study publishing May, 28 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Penny Gowland of the University of Nottingham, and colleagues.
Summer forage capabilities of tepary bean and guar in the southern great plains
Research identifies tepary bean and guar as potential summer forages.
Cincinnati children's HLH research points to treatment for COVID-19 cytokine storms
A transgenic mouse developed at Cincinnati Children's to model the deadly childhood immune disease HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis) may play a key role in saving lives during the COVID-19 virus pandemic.
MRI pregnancy study gives new insights into the all-important placenta
MRI research has revealed detailed new insights into how the placenta works in pregnancy and discovered a completely new phenomenon where the placenta contracts every now and then.
A comprehensive survey reveals bacteria are widespread in human tumors and differ by tumor type
Different human tumor types each harbor their own unique bacterial communities, researchers report in a new study that profiled the microbiomes of more than 1,500 individual tumors across seven types of human cancer - the most comprehensive tumor microbiome study to date.
A new horizon for vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy
(1) The development of solid state and time-step VCD methods opened a new horizon to reveal the mechanism of chirality amplification from microscopic to supramolecular scales.
Age, sex and smoking influence opioid receptor function in the brain
Opioids regulate the feelings of pleasure and pain in the brain.
Study questions benefits of social networks to disaster response
Faced with a common peril, people delay making decisions that might save lives, fail to alert each other to danger and spread misinformation.
Public option would lower health premiums, but not greatly expand coverage
State and federal lawmakers have expressed interest in creating a public health insurance option, with four different bills that would create a federal public option being introduced in the Congress in 2019.
First study of COVID-19 patients with diabetes shows that 10% die within seven days of hospital admission
The first study of COVID-19 to specifically analyse the effect of the disease in hospitalised patients with diabetes has found that one in ten patients dies within 7 days of hospital admission, and one in five is intubated and mechanically ventilated by this point.
New study: Stroke patients are significantly delaying treatment amid COVID-19
New research published today in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) shows ischemic stroke patients are arriving to hospitals and treatment centers an average of 160 minutes later during the COVID-19 pandemic, as compared with a similar timeframe in 2019.
Using electrical stimulus to regulate genes
A team of researchers led by ETH professor Martin Fussenegger has succeeded in using an electric current to directly control gene expression for the first time.
Combination therapy well-tolerated and highly effective for patients with IDH1-mutated AML
A combination therapy of ivosenidib (IVO) plus venetoclax (VEN) with or without azacitidine (AZA) was found to be effective against a specific genetic subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a Phase Ib/II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector.

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