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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 04, 2020


COVID-19 in pediatric surgical patients at 3 US children's hospitals
This study assessed how many pediatric patients presenting for surgery at three tertiary care children's hospitals across the US had COVID-19.
New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability
DNA-RNA hybrids, or R loops, are structures that generate genomic instability, a common feature of tumor cells.
GSA publishes articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus infographics on agesim and immunity
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access.
HPV vaccines that work in US women may miss the target in women from other countries
Most cervical cancers are caused by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV).
NASA infrared imagery indicates cristobal's heavy rainmaking capabilities
One of the ways NASA observes tropical cyclones is by using infrared data that provides temperature information and indicates storm strength.
Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration.
Childhood trauma affects the timing of motherhood
Women who have experienced childhood trauma become mothers earlier than those with a more stable childhood environment shows a new study conducted in collaboration between the University of Turku and the University of Helsinki in Finland.
New image of a cancer-related enzyme in action helps explain gene regulation
New images of an enzyme in action as it interacts with the chromosome could provide important insight into how cells--including cancer cells -- regulate their gene
Research tackles hidden 'tablet overload' as COVID isolation fears grow
New research provides a roadmap to help the millions of older Britons struggling with 'shopping lists' of medication, as fears grow that the current coronavirus lockdown could be further isolating the most vulnerable.
Paper-based technology advances earlier cancer detection
Washington State University researchers have developed a technology that is more than 30 times more sensitive than current lab-based tests in finding early stage cancer biomarkers in blood.
Strategic redundancy can prevent collapse of supply chains during global crises
Companies should use redundancy as a way to fortify their operations against unforeseeable events such as pandemics.
Responding to COVID-19: New early-view articles in the Hastings Center report
Responding to COVID-19: Vaccine rationing and social justice; ethical challenges for nurses; and more.
Largest ever study of radiosurgery for brain metastases from small cell lung cancer
The international First-line Radiosurgery for Small-Cell Lung Cancer (FIRE-SCLC) analysis led by University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers and published today in JAMA Oncology shows no overall survival benefit with whole-brain radiation therapy compared with radiosurgery in patients with small cell lung cancer.
The sensitive strain sensor that can detect the weight of a feather
Physicists have created the most sensitive strain sensor ever made, capable of detecting a feather's touch.
Scientists made a single-cell-resolution map of brain genes in humans and other primates
A group of scientists led by Philipp Khaitovich, a professor at Skoltech, conducted a large-scale study of gene expression in 33 different brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, macaques and bonobos using the single-cell-resolution transcriptomics technologies and made a map of the different brain regions with their specific cell structures.
Vision and balance issues are common in elementary school-age children with a concussion
In a new study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have performed the most comprehensive characterization of elementary school-age concussions to date, revealing an opportunity to improve outcomes for this age group through more consistent visio-vestibular assessments at the initial health care visit.
Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat
Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog -- could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia.
No smoke, but still hazardous
A more sensitive technique shows cigarette alternative may be more hazardous than manufacturer testing had found.
Wording of vaccination messages influences behavior
An experiment by Washington State University researchers revealed that relatively small differences in messages influenced people's attitudes about the human papillomavirus or HPV vaccine, which has been shown to help prevent cancer.
Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility
A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis.
Nontargeted mass spectrometry reveals PFAS substitutes in New Jersey soils
Using a nontargeted mass-spectral approach, researchers identified the presence of chloro-perfluoro-polyether-carboxylate compounds (ClPFPECAs) in soils across the state of New Jersey.
Identifying survivors at high risk of secondary cancers
St. Jude researchers look at the combined effect of cancer treatments and inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes.
Low ratings of workplace safety climate by hospital nurses linked to higher risk of injury
Compared to other groups of healthcare practitioners, nurses may have the poorest perceptions of workplace safety climate and the highest rates of injuries and sick time, suggests a single-hospital study in the May/June issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE).
Mangroves at risk if carbon emissions not reduced by 2050, international scientists predict
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), and an international research team have predicted that by 2050, mangroves will not be able to survive rising sea-levels if global carbon emissions are not reduced.
Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties
Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale.
Peatland drainage in Southeast Asia adds to climate change
Study reveals drainage, deforestation of the region's peatlands, which leads to fires, greenhouse emissions, land subsidence.
Why we should trust registered clinical trials
In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials.
Advances in nanoparticles as anticancer drug delivery vector: Need of this century
This review article provides a summary of current advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as anticancer drug-delivery vectors.
Silicon 'neurons' may add a new dimension to computer processors
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering shows that energy constraints on a system, coupled with an intrinsic property of systems, push silicon neurons to create a dynamic, at-a-distance communication that is more robust and efficient than traditional computer processors.
Applying symptom tracking to COVID-19 outpatient care using famotidine
Researchers are developing methods to test COVID-19 treatments on non-hospitalized patients.
Intranasal delivery of MSCs provides hope for treating Alzheimer's disease
In the attempt to find a possible cure for Alzheimer's disease, mesenchymal stem cells and their derived extracellular vesicles are being investigated for therapeutic purposes thanks to their protective and anti-inflammatory properties.
Uncuffing nitric oxide production: Beta-arrestin2 complexes regulate NO levels
In a new report, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have uncovered one of the mechanisms regulating the production of nitric oxide (NO) in liver endothelial cells.
Construction of new learning spaces calls for interaction between stakeholders and development of school's operational culture
New modern physical school spaces require open communication between stakeholders in order to be transformed into meaningful learning environments, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
Ancient genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland.
Asian tiger mosquito gains ground in Illinois
Researchers report that the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has become more abundant across Illinois in the past three decades.
IU researchers grow hairy skin from human stem cells
Building on years of groundbreaking discoveries in stem cell research, scientists from Indiana University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have determined how to grow hairy skin using human stem cells--developing one of the most complex skin models in the world.
Revealed from ancient sediment: Mangrove tolerance to rising sea levels
The growth and decline of mangrove forests during the final stages of Holocene deglaciation offers a glimpse into how the ecosystems will respond to the rapidly rising seas projected for the future, according to a new study.
Can't concentrate at work? This AI system knows why
Computer scientists have developed a way to measure staff comfort and concentration in flexible working spaces using artificial intelligence.
Biochemical alterations revealed in patients with Lesch-Nyhan disease
An international study by the Institute of Neuroscience of the UAB (INC-UAB), Emory University and Hospital Universitario La Paz, published in the PNAS journal, shows that patients suffering from Lesch-Nyhan, a rare neurological disease, present biochemical alterations in skin cells (fibroblasts), urine and cerebrospinal fluid.
Successful detailed tracking of major plant disease's global spread
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their Oregon State University collaborators have developed a new, highly detailed genetic way to trace the spread of Agrobacterium, one of the world's most important bacterial plant pathogens, according to research just published in Science.
International study approaches new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer
The international study ''Resistance to targeted therapies as a multifactorial, gradual adaptation to inhibitor specific selective pressures'', recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communication, has taken a further step in the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat lung cancer.
Disrupted sleep increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by promoting inflammation
Sleep disruption has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, but the mechanism has been unclear.
Inherited mutation linked to higher prostate cancer risk in African American families
For years, researchers have known that men of African ancestry are at greater risk of developing prostate cancer with research suggesting that inherited factors may contribute to their greater risk.
Leukemia immune profiles predict drug resistance and benefits of immunotherapy
By analyzing 442 samples from three groups of children and adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), researchers have identified new immune classes of the disease that predict the likelihood of drug resistance and positive responses to immunotherapy.
New alcohol genes uncovered
Do you have what is known as problematic alcohol use?
High blood pressure linked to increased risk of dying from COVID-19
Patients with raised blood pressure have a two-fold increased risk of dying from the coronavirus COVID-19 compared to patients without high blood pressure, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal.
3D facial scans could speed diagnoses for children with rare genetic diseases
Now an international team led by scientists and clinicians from the University of Colorado, University of Calgary, and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has developed a prototype tool based on three-dimensional (3D) facial imaging that could shorten that diagnostic odyssey by making it easier for clinicians to diagnose genetic syndromes.
Scientists discover that nicotine promotes spread of lung cancer to the brain
Among people who have the most common type of lung cancer, up to 40% develop metastatic brain tumors, with an average survival time of less than six months.
With faster cell modeling towards the vaccine and cure for COVID-19
Researchers from the Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering 'Giulio Natta' of the Politecnico di Milano and the Pediatric Research Center, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences 'L.
Environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space, find hydrologists
A study led by ecohydrologists at IUPUI is the first to show it's possible to use satellite data to understand how fog reduction from climate change is harming vegetation in ecologically rare regions.
New antibody technology for monitoring MS patients may have potential in COVID-19 testing
A new study by Queen Mary University of London has demonstrated the effectiveness of using a novel light technology to monitor anti-drug antibodies in the treatment of MS, which leads to drug resistance and treatment failure.
How can you sleep during a solo sailing race?
Weeks of sailing on a 6 meters boat, nothing but the ocean for four thousand miles.
Mothers ensure their offspring's success through epigenetics
Parents pass genes along to their offspring which equip them for their future life.
Small see-through container improves plant micrografting
A transparent container made by Nagoya University researchers allows easy and quick grafting of very young plants, with benefits for agriculture and plant research.
Study links malaria risk in deforestation hotspots to demand for agricultural commodities
The international trade in timber, tobacco, cocoa, coffee and cotton accounts for a high proportion of malaria risk in exporter countries, according to a collaborative study by scientists in Brazil and Australia published in Nature Communications.
New material, modeling methods promise advances in energy storage
The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them.
Technology for cloud efficiency for databases during data-intensive COVID-19 pandemic
A Purdue team created a technology called OPTIMUSCLOUD -- which is designed to help achieve cost and performance efficiency for cloud-hosted databases.
Temperament affects children's eating habits
Temperamental children are at greater risk for developing unhealthy eating habits.
Sleep, death and ... the gut?
A new study finds a causal link between sleep deprivation and death.
UCF's butterfly-inspired nanotech makes natural-looking pictures on digital screens
The new technology creates digital displays that are lit by surrounding light and are more natural looking than current display technologies that rely on energy-intensive bright lights hidden behind screens.
Discovery unlocks 'hot' electrons for more efficient energy use
Researchers have demonstrated how a technique using a scanning tunneling microscope integrated with lasers and other optical components reveals the energy distribution of hot electrons.
New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown
In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Not children, but 'super-happy families' the aim of assisted reproduction
Researcher Judith Lind has studied how staff at fertility clinics view the assessments that childless couples and women undergo in order to access assisted reproduction.
Study shows some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months
New research from neuroscientists at York University suggests the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it.
Eat less and live a long healthy life? Study shows 'not in all cases'
The assumption that dietary restriction (and drugs that mimic its effects) will extend both lifespan and healthspan jointly has come under question, based on research involving 160 genetically distinct strains of fruit fly.
Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19
Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have joined forces with a research team at Stanford to aim a gene-targeting, antiviral agent called PAC-MAN against COVID-19.
High-protein diets help insects to fight against blood parasites
Scientists studying insects have identified a crucial biological mechanism responsible for increasing their survival against blood parasites.
Researchers study alternative training tools designed to improve Soldier performance
As the US Army revamps its small arms training and raises rifle qualification standards, researchers are studying alternative training and tools to help improve Soldier performance.
Tillage and cover cropping effects on grain production
Soybean yields decreased when planted after cereal rye.
Showtime for photosynthesis
Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, an international team of researchers has revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.
redHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method that simplifies the processing of genetic-metabolic data by picking up changes in metabolism, a hallmark of numerous diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's.
Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, study suggests
Researchers have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors.
Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes.
Revealed: How cancer develops resistance to treatment
Garvan researchers reveal the tactic that cancer cells use to adapt and evade treatment.
Future of the western North Pacific Subtropical High: Weaker or stronger?
With correction by observed sea surface temperature, under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5, a high greenhouse gas emission scenario, the models will tend to agree on a future intensification of the western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) with 45% of the uncertainty reduced, which implies stronger East Asian summer monsoon with increased rainfall but reduced typhoon landfalls over East Asia.
Analysis of ancient genomes suggests Caribbean settled by three colonization events
The islands of the Caribbean were settled and resettled by at least three successive waves of colonists from the American mainland, according to a new study, which presents new findings from an examination of ancient DNA from 93 early Caribbean islanders.
High-speed atomic video
A team including researchers from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo has successfully captured video of single molecules in motion at 1,600 frames per second.
BIOCAD presents results of clinical trial proving efficacy of netakimab at EULAR 2020
BIOCAD presents results of clinical trial proving efficacy of netakimab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2020).
New study reveals areas of brain where recognition and identification occur
Using ''sub-millimeter'' brain implants, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), have been able to determine which parts of the brain are linked to facial and scene recognition.
New technique retains nipple color in men after breast reduction
Surgeons at UT Southwestern Medical Center have pioneered a new technique that prevents nipple discoloration and preserves shape in men who undergo breast reduction surgery following significant weight loss.
Psoriasis patients' mental health is more than skin-deep
A new study from Umeå University, Sweden, shows that other somatic diseases have even more impact on patients' mental health than their skin symptoms, highlighting the importance of holistic patient care.
New microscopy method provides unprecedented look at amyloid protein structure
Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are often accompanied by amyloid proteins in the brain that have become clumped or misfolded.
Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if emissions aren't cut
Mangrove trees -- valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates - won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science.
DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products
Harvard researchers have developed synthetic microbial spores that can be safely introduced onto objects and surfaces at a point of origin, such as a field or manufacturing plant, and be detected and identified months later.
NASA finds Nisarga's remnants over Central India
Tropical Cyclone Nisarga made landfall in west central India on June 4, and the next day NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants of the storm.
Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce
Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables.
Stakeholders update newborn screening guidelines for critical congenital heart disease
A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry.
Immune from chronic stress? Limit inflammatory signaling to specific brain circuits
Chronic stress is associated with the pathogenesis of psychological disorders such as depression.
For acute myeloid leukemia, genetic testing is often worth the wait
New tailored therapies offer exciting prospects for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but taking advantage of them may require waiting a week or more for genetic testing before starting treatment, posing a dilemma for doctors and patients facing this deadly and often fast-moving disease.
Largest study to date of electronic dental records reviews understudied populations
The largest study to date of electronic dental records (EDRs) delves into both previously inaccessible data and data from understudied populations with the ultimate goal of improving oral treatment outcomes.
Ancient DNA provides new insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new study by an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland.
Fluorescence bioimaging
Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging.
Opioid addiction treatment is more widely available, but only for adults
Primary care providers have expanded access to buprenorphine for adults, but use of the opioid addiction treatment has decreased among the youngest patients, find researchers at Columbia University.
How cells solve their identity crisis
Cancer is often the result of DNA mutations or problems with how cells divide, which can lead to cells 'forgetting' what type of cell they are or how to function properly.
Universal preoperative COVID-19 screening improves pediatric patient safety
Universally screening pediatric patients for COVID-19 before they undergo surgical procedures has allowed hospitals to improve safety by identifying all patients who test positive for the virus, half of whom have no symptoms, according to new research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
Novel switch protein that 'turns on' sperm for fertilization
Researchers from Osaka University and Baylor College of Medicine discovered a signaling cascade in which the testicular protein NELL2 travels through the lumen to induce differentiation of the epididymis, secretion of the protease OVCH2, and subsequent sperm maturation.
Women are not more likely to die of cirrhosis than men, despite fewer liver transplants
Prior studies suggested women might have higher mortality of cirrhosis of the liver than men.
Growth factors and Parkinson's disease -- Where next?
Growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were initially thought to be exciting new treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), but trials have been disappointing.
Beating COVID-19 through genomic research
Next-generation sequencing of the COVID-19 virus is providing powerful metagenomic data, which, combined with clinical data, will inform the search for effective treatments.
Some types of prostate cancer may not be as aggressive as originally thought
UCLA researchers analyzed gene-expression patterns in the most aggressive prostate cancer grade group and found that this grade of cancer can actually be subdivided into four subtypes with distinct differences.
Probiotics with top-performing Lactobacillus strains may improve vaginal health
Vaginal Lactobacillus bacterial strains largely perform better than strains currently used in probiotics for vaginal health, according to a study published June 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jo-Ann Passmore of the University of Cape Town, and colleagues.
Gut research delves deeper into obesity problems
Serotonin in the gut is considered a regulator of normal gut function and is an important driver of metabolism and metabolic diseases including obesity and type 2 diabetes.
New discovery may lead to effective and natural treatment for Parkinson's disease
McLean Hospital researchers have identified two molecules naturally produced by the body that stimulate the production of dopamine, the molecule that is in short supply in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.
Using genetically engineered, barcoded microbes to track food contamination and more
Synthetic spores programmed with DNA barcodes provide a highly flexible, high-resolution system for tagging and tracking the provenance of an object.
The most viewed videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube
Researchers at UPV have analyzed about 40,000 videos about COVID-19 posted on YouTube up to April 30th.
Use loss of taste and smell as key screening tool for COVID-19, researchers urge
King's College London researchers have called for the immediate use of additional COVID-19 symptoms to detect new cases, reduce infections and save lives.
Atherosclerosis -- How a microRNA protects vascular integrity
Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown molecular function of a specific microRNA that preserves integrity of the endothelium and reduces the risk of atherosclerosis.
Plant detectives develop new way to trace global spread of major plant disease
A team led by Oregon State University scientists has developed a way to potentially thwart the spread of a disease-causing bacterium that harms more than hundred plant species worldwide, an advance that could save the nursery industry billions of dollars a year.
Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions.
Molecular landscape of the hematopoietic stem cell cradle
Researchers from the group of Catherine Robin at the Hubrecht Institute characterized the molecular landscape of the aorta where all hematopoietic stem cells are initially formed in zebrafish, chicken, mouse and human embryos.
Widely available indigestion drug may curb COVID-19 symptoms in mild to moderate disease
A widely available and inexpensive drug that is used to ease the symptoms of indigestion may prove a worthy contender for treating COVID-19 infection in those whose disease doesn't require admission to hospital, suggest the findings of a small case series, published online in the journal Gut.
New study reveals cracks beneath giant, methane gushing craters
250-million-year-old cracks in the seafloor feed greenhouse gas methane into giant craters in the Barents Sea.
Adult neurogenesis essential for sleep-induced memory consolidation in mice
Adult neurogenesis, in which new neurons are generated within the hippocampus in the fully developed adult brain, occurs in mice -- but how new neurons are functionally integrated into existing brain circuitry has remained largely unknown.
New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division
Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells.
Study shows diamonds aren't forever
Two Tulane researchers were among a team of international experts who co-authored a paper that was published in the journal Nature on June 3.
Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people
Preliminary observations suggest a high incidence of COVID-19 in stroke patients, including younger patients who were otherwise healthy.
Mortality of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients is lower than previously reported reveals study in Critical Care Medicine
An online first study published in Critical Care Medicine indicates the actual mortality rate of adults with critical illness from COVID-19 is less than what was previously reported.
Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered
New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium.
Insight into protein misfolding could open up new approaches to treat Parkinson's disease
Researchers have uncovered a link between the structure of the protein alpha-synuclein and its likelihood to misfold and aggregate.
Two vital buffers against climate change are just offshore
A new study finds that about 31 million people worldwide live in coastal regions that are 'highly vulnerable' to future tropical storms and sea-level rise driven by climate change.
New clues on how lipid emulsions prevent liver disease in preterm babies
New evidence links the microbiome and gut bile acids to lipid emulsion prevention of liver disease in preterm babies.
Small protein, big impact
In meningococci, the RNA-binding protein ProQ plays a major role.
Stimulating research gives new treatment hope for Tourette Syndrome
New research has found that delivering electrical pulses to the wrist can significantly reduce the amount and severity of tics experienced by individuals with Tourette Syndrome (TS), giving new hope for an effective treatment.
'Artificial chemist' combines AI, robotics to conduct autonomous R&D
Researchers have developed a technology called 'Artificial Chemist,' which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

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