Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 07, 2020


Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
If renal remission is achieved therapeutically in cases of lupus nephritis (LN), the 10-year survival rate increases significantly.
Prophylaxis after relapse of ANCA-associated vasculitis
Relapses are not uncommon in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). The disease can cause severe injury to kidneys and other organs, even death.
Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk
Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia.
Empagliflozin -- kidney protection regardless of an initial 'eGFR dip'
Data presented today at the ERA-EDTA Congress show that empagliflozin is more likely to induce an initial 'dip' in eGFR in patients belonging to a higher KDIGO risk category and/or on diuretic therapy.
Climate change has degraded productivity of shelf sea food webs
Released to coincide with World Oceans Day, new research led by the University of Plymouth has shown that a shortage of summer nutrients -- a result of our changing climate -- has contributed to a 50% decline in important North East Atlantic plankton over the past 60 years.
ANCA-associated vasculitis: The ADVOCATE Study
ANCA-associated vasculitis causes inflammation of small blood vessels, which may result in severe injury to the kidneys, lungs and other organs -- even death.
Pinker flamingos more aggressive
Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows.
Great white shark diet surprises scientists
The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected.
Jodrell Bank leads international effort which reveals 157 day cycle in unusual cosmic radio bursts
An investigation into one of the current great mysteries of astronomy has come to the fore thanks to a four-year observing campaign conducted at the Jodrell Bank Observatory.
Sex differences in participation in large-scale genetic studies may affect results
An international group of researchers have found differences in the characteristics that drive men and women to participate in genome-wide association studies, which analyse genetic variants in different individuals to see if any are associated with a trait or disease.
Hope for patients with primary hyperoxaluria type 1
Lumasiran is a subcutaneously administered RNAi therapeutic targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) - the gene encoding glycolate oxidase (GO) - in development for the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1).
For university classrooms, are telepresence robots the next best thing to being there?
Telepresence robots help university students learning remotely to feel more a part of the class, new research suggests.
Virus DNA spread across surfaces in hospital ward over 10 hours
Virus DNA left on a hospital bed rail was found in nearly half of all sites sampled across a ward within 10 hours and persisted for at least five days, according to a new study by UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.